2

I have x-y data, which both have +/- errors (that are equal on each side). The type of data it is has normal distribution, on in both the x-y direction. At the moment we plot it either as typical x-y crosses, or using geom_rect(); but both of which have issues in demonstrating what the data represents. I am looking for a solution that would allow the each of the x-y data points to be represented as some sort of normal/Gaussian distribution (instead of just as +) as per my rough sketch below.

x-y plot with normal distributions for both errors

Below is an example data frame.

structure(list(Age = c(2003L, 1999L, 1995L, 1993L, 1993L, 1990L, 1988L, 1987L, 1985L, 1984L, 1983L, 1975L, 1974L, 1972L, 1963L, 1960L, 1959L, 1957L, 1953L, 1951L, 1951L, 1946L, 1940L, 1936L, 1930L, 1927L, 1919L, 1914L, 1906L, 1885L, 1864L, 1842L, 1830L, 1810L, 1803L, 1783L, 1762L, 1741L, 1720L, 1699L, 1678L, 1657L ), Age_error = c(1L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 4L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 5L, 3L, 3L, 4L, 6L, 4L, 8L, 5L, 7L, 5L, 10L, 14L, 17L, 23L, 21L, 20L, 53L, 67L, 30L, 30L, 30L, 30L, 30L, 30L, 30L, 30L), Value = c(0, 0.07, 0, 0.09, 0.02, 0.06, -0.02, 0.154, 0.05, 0.02, -0.03, -0.024, -0.01, -0.06, -0.15, -0.04, 0.065, -0.1, -0.09, -0.02, -0.024, -0.11, -0.081, -0.13, -0.12, -0.07, -0.16, -0.122, -0.057, -0.18, -0.095, -0.105, -0.23, -0.19, -0.178, -0.267, -0.26, -0.158, -0.079, -0.218, -0.148, -0.193), Value_error = c(0.17, 0.143, 0.18, 0.18, 0.17, 0.19, 0.18, 0.163, 0.19, 0.18, 0.18, 0.142, 0.17, 0.18, 0.17, 0.17, 0.152, 0.17, 0.17, 0.17, 0.151, 0.17, 0.154, 0.17, 0.18, 0.26, 0.17, 0.144, 0.145, 0.18, 0.153, 0.153, 0.17, 0.18, 0.144, 0.155, 0.138, 0.141, 0.157, 0.14, 0.147, 0.137)), .Names = c("Age", "Age_error", "Value", "Value_error"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -42L))

This is the sort of code I am using to just get a typical x-y error plot for this data frame.

ggplot() + geom_linerange(data=mydata, aes(y=Value, x=Age, xmin=Age-Age_error, xmax=Age+Age_error, ymin=Value-Value_error, ymax=Value+Value_error)) + geom_errorbarh(data=mydata, aes(y=Value, x=Age, xmin=Age-Age_error, xmax=Age+Age_error, ymin=Value-Value_error, ymax=Value+Value_error)) 

I haven't found a function yet to do x-y normal distribution type plots and there might not be one, but thought someone might have some ideas! Many thanks in advance.

  • why is it a cross and not a disc / ellipse (still with radial gradient)? – baptiste Aug 15 '13 at 10:53
  • It could be an ellipse; but I guess I had sketched at a cross (by overlaying two ellipses) as the corners between the two ellipses would need to be kind of convex when I have sketched two bell curves over the top of each other. If I could plot the x error as one ellipse, and the y as another, it would be probably create this affect if I made it alpha=0.5 or similar. Is there a way to plot shaded ellipse for the symbols? – ahsat Aug 16 '13 at 5:46
0

Do you want a contour plot of Age versus Value as a 2d kernel density?

require(MASS)
dens <- with(dat, MASS::kde2d(Age, Value))
str(dens)
#-------------
List of 3
 $ x: num [1:25] 1657 1671 1686 1700 1715 ...
 $ y: num [1:25] -0.267 -0.249 -0.232 -0.214 -0.197 ...
 $ z: num [1:25, 1:25] 0.00152 0.00187 0.00226 0.00267 0.00312 ...
#--------------
# kde2d is designed for contour display: x-vector, y-vector, z-Matrix
 contour(dens)

Added the data points so the connection between the contour plot and the data was more visible:

 points(dat$Age, dat$Value, cex=0.3, col="red")

enter image description here

  • Nice idea, but afraid not. I need each Age-Value pair to have both a +ve and -ve error, ideally so the errors visually looks like a normal distribution i.e. so each cross looks a bit like the sketch I drew. – ahsat Aug 14 '13 at 20:24
0

If you need each Age,Value pair to have a +ve and -ve error, then I think you may be looking for smoothScatter function. This function plots densities of each point using a color scheme that fades as you get farther from the point.

smoothScatter(mydata$Age, mydata$Value)

Results in

enter image description here

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.