8

I would like to apply an adaptive filter in Python, but can't find any documentation or examples online of how to implement such an algorithm. I'm familiar with designing "static" filters using the scipy.signal toolbox, but what I don't know how to do is design an adaptive filter.

To clarify: I have a recorded signal S which contains noise. Within this recording there is a "true" function that I would like to access, call this T. I also have an estimate of T. I want to design a filter such that the error between the filtered S and T is minimised. Note that in this case a static filter is not useful, as I am trying to filter a nonstationary signal.

11

Here's a basic LMS adaptive filter in Python with Numpy.
Comments are welcome, testcases most welcome.

enter image description here

""" lms.py: a simple python class for Least mean squares adaptive filter """

from __future__ import division
import numpy as np

__version__ = "2013-08-29 aug denis"

#...............................................................................
class LMS:
    """ lms = LMS( Wt, damp=.5 )  Least mean squares adaptive filter
    in:
        Wt: initial weights, e.g. np.zeros( 33 )
        damp: a damping factor for swings in Wt

    # for t in range(1000):

    yest = lms.est( X, y [verbose=] )
    in: X: a vector of the same length as Wt
        y: signal + noise, a scalar
        optional verbose > 0: prints a line like "LMS: yest y c"
    out: yest = Wt.dot( X )
        lms.Wt updated

    How it works:
    on each call of est( X, y ) / each timestep,
    increment Wt with a multiple of this X:
        Wt += c X
    What c would give error 0 for *this* X, y ?

        y = (Wt + c X) . X
        =>
        c = (y  -  Wt . X)
            --------------
               X . X

    Swings in Wt are damped a bit with a damping factor a.k.a. mu in 0 .. 1:
        Wt += damp * c * X

    Notes:
        X s are often cut from a long sequence of scalars, but can be anything:
        samples at different time scales, seconds minutes hours,
        or for images, cones in 2d or 3d x time.

"""

# See also:
#     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Least_mean_squares_filter
#     Mahmood et al. Tuning-free step-size adaptation, 2012, 4p
# todo: y vec, X (Wtlen,ylen)

#...............................................................................
    def __init__( self, Wt, damp=.5 ):
        self.Wt = np.squeeze( getattr( Wt, "A", Wt ))  # matrix -> array
        self.damp = damp

    def est( self, X, y, verbose=0 ):
        X = np.squeeze( getattr( X, "A", X ))
        yest = self.Wt.dot(X)
        c = (y - yest) / X.dot(X)
            # clip to cmax ?
        self.Wt += self.damp * c * X
        if verbose:
            print "LMS: yest %-6.3g   y %-6.3g   err %-5.2g   c %.2g" % (
                yest, y, yest - y, c )
        return yest

#...............................................................................
if __name__ == "__main__":
    import sys

    filterlen = 10
    damp = .1
    nx = 500
    f1 = 40  # chirp
    noise = .05 * 2  # * swing
    plot = 0
    seed = 0

    exec( "\n".join( sys.argv[1:] ))  # run this.py n= ...  from sh or ipython
    np.set_printoptions( 2, threshold=100, edgeitems=10, linewidth=80, suppress=True )
    np.random.seed(seed)

    def chirp( n, f0=2, f1=40, t1=1 ):  # <-- your test function here
        # from $scipy/signal/waveforms.py
        t = np.arange( n + 0. ) / n * t1
        return np.sin( 2*np.pi * f0 * (f1/f0)**t )

    Xlong = chirp( nx, f1=f1 )
    # Xlong = np.cos( 2*np.pi * freq * np.arange(nx) )
    if noise:
        Xlong += np.random.normal( scale=noise, size=nx )  # laplace ...
    Xlong *= 10

    print 80 * "-"
    title = "LMS  chirp  filterlen %d  nx %d  noise %.2g  damp %.2g " % (
        filterlen, nx, noise, damp )
    print title
    ys = []
    yests = []

#...............................................................................
    lms = LMS( np.zeros(filterlen), damp=damp )
    for t in xrange( nx - filterlen ):
        X = Xlong[t:t+filterlen]
        y = Xlong[t+filterlen]  # predict
        yest = lms.est( X, y, verbose = (t % 10 == 0) )
        ys += [y]
        yests += [yest]

    y = np.array(ys)
    yest = np.array(yests)
    err = yest - y
    averr = "av %.2g += %.2g" % (err.mean(), err.std())
    print "LMS yest - y:", averr
    print "LMS weights:", lms.Wt
    if plot:
        import pylab as pl
        fig, ax = pl.subplots( nrows=2 )
        fig.set_size_inches( 12, 8 )
        fig.suptitle( title, fontsize=12 )
        ax[0].plot( y, color="orangered", label="y" )
        ax[0].plot( yest, label="yest" )
        ax[0].legend()
        ax[1].plot( err, label=averr )
        ax[1].legend()
        if plot >= 2:
            pl.savefig( "tmp.png" )
        pl.show()
  • 1
    Thanks for this excellent script. I have one question: how can I supply an original estimate of my function to the adaptive filter? In your example code you pass the variable y, which is just some scalar... but say I want to use the adaptive filter to extract a signal from a function using an estimate of the signal. It's not clear to me how to do this with your script. – allhands Aug 30 '13 at 16:07
  • 1
    @allhands, yest in the plot and test code is an estimate of signal y, based on the real signal (here chirp), real noise (normal), X (the previous filterlen=10 signal + noise inputs), and damping factor. This example of extracting chirp from chirp + noise is poor because yest and y are pretty close; need a better example ... – denis Sep 1 '13 at 16:17
8

You should check the Padasip library https://pypi.python.org/pypi/padasip

Multiple adaptive filters are implemented in this library. You can use it directly, or investigate, how the filters there are created (source code is on github https://github.com/matousc89/padasip)

If you want to just test the applicability of any implemented adaptive filter for your case, see this tutorial Padasip Adaptive Filters Basics - Noise Cancelation, System Identification and Signal Prediction

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