4

I have a one year production site configured with django.contrib.sessions.backends.cached_db backend with a MySQL dabatase backend. The reason why I choice cached_db is a mix of security with read performance.

The problem is, the cleanup command, responsible to delete all expired sessions, was sadly never been executed, resuting in a 2.3GB session table data length, 6 million rows and 500Mb index length.

When I try to run the ./manage.py cleanup (in Django 1.3) command, or ./manage.py clearsessions (Django`s 1.5 correspondent), the process never ends (or my patience doesn't complete 3 hours).

The code that django use's to do this is:

Session.objects.filter(expire_date__lt=timezone.now()).delete()

In a first impression, I think that's normal because the table has 6M rows, but, after I inspect System's monitor, I discover that all memory and cpu was used by the python process, not mysqld, fullfilling my machine's resources. I think that's something terrible wrong with this command code. Seem's that's python iterate over all founded expired sessions row before delete each of them, one by one. In this case, a code refactoring to just raw a DELETE FROM command can resolve my problem and helps django community, right? But, if this is the case, a Queryset delete command is acting weird and none optimized in my opinion. Am i right?

Thanks

  • 3
    Django uses its ORM to delete records which isn't efficient for bulk operations - you'd be better off just doing a SQL DELETE where the session has expired - otherwise, it's retrieving each row, one at a time, starting a transaction, checking properties haven't changed, deleting it, committing, etc, etc – Basic Aug 15 '13 at 18:13
  • 1
    With Postgres, you can achieve exactly what Basic suggested with DELETE FROM django_session WHERE expire_date < now();. Don't forget to do a backup first ! – niconoe Apr 10 '15 at 9:06
  • 1
    Depending of the size table and your Postgres version, you may also need to perform a VACUUM, 'VACUUM FULL` (and maybe REINDEX) to give the free space back to your OS. See wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/VACUUM_FULL. – niconoe Apr 10 '15 at 9:52
  • Possible duplicate of Delete session key from all users – e4c5 May 19 '16 at 13:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.