146

Why does this not compile?

int? number = true ? 5 : null;

Type of conditional expression cannot be determined because there is no implicit conversion between 'int' and <null>

305

The spec (§7.14) says that for conditional expression b ? x : y, there are three possibilities, either x and y both have a type and certain good conditions are met, only one of x and y has a type and certain good conditions are met, or a compile-time error occurs. Here, "certain good conditions" means certain conversions are possible, which we will get into the details of below.

Now, let's turn to the germane part of the spec:

If only one of x and y has a type, and both x and y are implicitly convertible to that type, then that is the type of the conditional expression.

The issue here is that in

int? number = true ? 5 : null;

only one of the conditional results has a type. Here x is an int literal, and y is null which does not have a type and null is not implicitly convertible to an int1. Therefore, "certain good conditions" aren't met, and a compile-time error occurs.

There are two ways around this:

int? number = true ? (int?)5 : null;

Here we are still in the case where only one of x and y has a type. Note that null still does not have a type yet the compiler won't have any problem with this because (int?)5 and null are both implicitly convertible to int? (§6.1.4 and §6.1.5).

The other way is obviously:

int? number = true ? 5 : (int?)null;

but now we have to read a different clause in the spec to understand why this is okay:

If x has type X and y has type Y then

  • If an implicit conversion (§6.1) exists from X to Y, but not from Y to X, then Y is the type of the conditional expression.

  • If an implicit conversion (§6.1) exists from Y to X, but not from X to Y, then X is the type of the conditional expression.

  • Otherwise, no expression type can be determined, and a compile-time error occurs.

Here x is of type int and y is of type int?. There is no implicit conversion from int? to int, but there is an implicit conversion from int to int? so the type of the expression is int?.

1: Note further that the type of the left-hand side is ignored in determining the type of the conditional expression, a common source of confusion here.

  • 4
    Good quoting of the spec to illustrate why this happens - +1! – JerKimball Aug 15 '13 at 20:22
  • 6
    Another option is new int?() in place of (int?)null. – Guvante Aug 15 '13 at 22:30
  • 1
    This is also the case if you have a nullable database field type, for example a nullable DateTime and you try and cast data to DateTime, when it infact required (DateTime?) – Mike Upjohn Sep 16 '15 at 14:58
65

null does not have any identifiable type - it just needs a little prodding to make it happy:

int? number = true ? 5 : (int?)null;
  • 1
    Or you can do int? number = true ? 5 : null as int?; – Brad M Aug 15 '13 at 19:49
  • Nice answer nailing the point. Nice related reading: ericlippert.com/2013/05/30/what-the-meaning-of-is-is – Benjamin Gruenbaum Aug 15 '13 at 20:01
  • The issue is not that null doesn't have an identifiable type. The issue is that there is no implicit conversion from null to int. Details here. – jason Aug 15 '13 at 20:11
  • the interesting thing is that int? number = true ? 5 : (int?)null; and int? number = true ? (int?)5 : null; both compile!! Scratch, scratch – davidhq Aug 15 '13 at 20:19
  • 2
    I cover exactly why this happens in my answer. – jason Aug 15 '13 at 20:22
0

As others have mentioned, the 5 is an int, and null cannot be implicitly converted to int.

Here are other ways to work around the issue:

int? num = true ? 5 : default(int?);
int? num = true ? 5 : new int?();

int? num = true ? 5 : null as int?;
int? num = true ? 5 : (int?)null;

int? num = true ? (int?)5 : null;
int? num = true ? 5 as int? : null;

int? num = true ? new int?(5) : null;

Also, anywhere you see int?, you could also use Nullable<int>.

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