21

I'm building a little website using bootstrap. The base structure looks like this:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <link href="http://netdna.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.0.0-wip/css/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet">
    <style tpye="text/css">
        .row {
            height: 100px;
            background-color: green;
        }

        .container {
            margin-top: 50px;
            box-shadow: 0 0 10px 10px black; /*THIS does not work as expected*/
        }
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="container">
        <div class="row">one</div>
        <div class="row">two</div>
        <div class="row">three</div>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

See it in action: http://jsfiddle.net/ZDCjq/

Now I want the whole site to have a dropshadow on all 4 sides. The problem is, that the bootstrap grid makes use of negative margins and this makes the rows overlap the shadow.

Is there a way to accomplish this while leaving all bootstrap functionality intact?

EDIT: The expected result is this: http://i.imgur.com/rPKuDhc.png

EDIT: this problem was only present until bootstrap 3 rc2. the final bootstrap 3 makes the workaround below obsolete.

  • Hi there, do you mind posting an image of what you want to accomplish? Also remember that when something doesn't come with bootstrap you can really just write your own CSS. – sulfureous Aug 15 '13 at 22:44
  • Do you require the drop shadow to be the same width on all 4 sides? – edsioufi Aug 15 '13 at 22:49
  • @edsioufi: yes thats exactly what i need. – sloewen Aug 15 '13 at 23:00
  • and do you need the shadow to have a blur? Or would a solid shadow be fine? – edsioufi Aug 15 '13 at 23:02
  • @edsioufi: I need it to be blurred. (A solid one could be done with a border on the row-divs i think) – sloewen Aug 15 '13 at 23:04
20

http://jsfiddle.net/Y93TX/2/

     @import url("http://netdna.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.0.0-wip/css/bootstrap.min.css");

.row {
    height: 100px;
    background-color: green;
}
.container {
    margin-top: 50px;
    box-shadow: 0 0 30px black;
    padding:0 15px 0 15px;
}



    <div class="container">
        <div class="row">one</div>
        <div class="row">two</div>
        <div class="row">three</div>
    </div>
</body>
  • Thats what the result should look like. But the problem is that i want to maintain all the flexibility that bootstrap gives me (mobile-ready). Your solution ignores bootstrap. – sloewen Aug 15 '13 at 23:44
  • Same result, but with just the CSS you originally had jsfiddle.net/Y93TX – benny Aug 15 '13 at 23:52
  • In bootstrap you are supposed to use row-fluid and container-fluid classes to keep the flexibility and functionality of it good with what comes stock with Bootstrap. – sulfureous Aug 15 '13 at 23:55
  • @BenMun: but when i add bootstrap it breaks: jsfiddle.net/Y93TX/1 – sloewen Aug 15 '13 at 23:59
  • @sulfureous: in bootstrap 3 there are no row-fluid or container-fluid classes anymore. everything is fluid by default – sloewen Aug 15 '13 at 23:59
7

Add an additional div around all container divs you want the drop shadow to encapsulate. Add the classes drop-shadow and container to the additional div. The class .container will keep the fluidity. Use the class .drop-shadow (or whatever you like) to add the box-shadow property. Then target the .drop-shadow div and negate the unwanted styles .container adds--such as left & right padding.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/SHLu4/2/

It'll be something like:

<div class="container drop-shadow">
    <div class="container">
        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-md-8">Main Area</div>
            <div class="col-md-4">Side Area</div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

And your CSS:

<style>
    .drop-shadow {
        -webkit-box-shadow: 0 0 5px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, .5);
        box-shadow: 0 0 5px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, .5);
    }
    .container.drop-shadow {
        padding-left:0;
        padding-right:0;
    }
</style>
  • 3
    why is there a nested .container div inside another .container div? How is the first one necessary? – ayjay Aug 11 '14 at 23:35
4

For those wanting the box-shadow on the col-* container itself and not on the .container, you can add another div just inside the col-* element, and add the shadow to that. This element will not have the padding, and therefor not interfere.

The first image has the box-shadow on the col-* element. Because of the 15px padding on the col element, the shadow is pushed to the outside of the div element rather than on the visual edges of it.

box-shadow on col-* element

<div class="col-md-4" style="box-shadow: 0px 2px 25px rgba(0, 0, 0, .25);">
    <div class="thumbnail">
        {!! HTML::image('images/sampleImage.png') !!}
    </div>
</div>

The second image has a wrapper div with the box-shadow on it. This will place the box-shadow on the visual edges of the element.

box-shadow on wrapper div

<div class="col-md-4">
    <div id="wrapper-div" style="box-shadow: 0px 2px 25px rgba(0, 0, 0, .25);">
        <div class="thumbnail">
            {!! HTML::image('images/sampleImage.png') !!}
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
  • Is there a way I can add a label at the bottom center of the image? – Abhi Jul 29 '16 at 6:17
0

You should give the container an id and use that in your custom css file (which should be linked after the bootstrap css):

#container { box-shadow: values }

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