518

How would I create a list with values between two values I put in? For example, the following list is generated for values from 11 to 16:

list = [11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16]

12 Answers 12

924

Use range. In Python 2.x it returns a list so all you need is:

>>> range(11, 17)
[11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16]

In Python 3.x range is a iterator. So, you need to convert it to a list:

>>> list(range(11, 17))
[11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16]

Note: The second number is exclusive. So, here it needs to be 16+1 = 17

EDIT:

To respond to the question about incrementing by 0.5, the easiest option would probably be to use numpy's arange() and .tolist():

>>> import numpy as np
>>> np.arange(11, 17, 0.5).tolist()

[11.0, 11.5, 12.0, 12.5, 13.0, 13.5,
 14.0, 14.5, 15.0, 15.5, 16.0, 16.5]
9
  • 2
    Awesome! Exactly what I was looking for! Is there also a way to increment by smaller values like 0.5 than just 1? so [11.0, 11.5, 12.0 ...... 16.0]
    – lorde
    Aug 16, 2013 at 4:50
  • 4
    @lorde You can increment by more than 1 with a third step parameter but that's still an int -- not float. You can't do that exactly in the standard lib.
    – Jared
    Aug 16, 2013 at 4:53
  • @Jared can I make a list by dropping some value after some interval. like [1,2,3,5,6,7,9,10,11,13,14,15,17,18,19]
    – user6390698
    Jun 7, 2016 at 9:12
  • 2
    Good for telling about Python 2.x and 3.x.
    – Sigur
    Apr 15, 2017 at 16:24
  • 1
    If you're working in circumstances where numpy is unwanted, consider (where x=11, y=17, and step=0.5 as above): a_range = [x]+[x+(step*i) for i in range(int((y-x)/step))] Oct 3, 2018 at 17:53
40

You seem to be looking for range():

>>> x1=11
>>> x2=16
>>> range(x1, x2+1)
[11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16]
>>> list1 = range(x1, x2+1)
>>> list1
[11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16]

For incrementing by 0.5 instead of 1, say:

>>> list2 = [x*0.5 for x in range(2*x1, 2*x2+1)]
>>> list2
[11.0, 11.5, 12.0, 12.5, 13.0, 13.5, 14.0, 14.5, 15.0, 15.5, 16.0]
1
  • x*increment, but what do you mean by 2*startvalue, what for? would you explain please? Mar 27, 2017 at 7:30
15

Try:

range(x1, x2+1)  

That is a list in Python 2.x and behaves mostly like a list in Python 3.x. If you are running Python 3 and need a list that you can modify, then use:

list(range(x1, x2+1))
6

assuming you want to have a range between x to y

range(x,y+1)

>>> range(11,17)
[11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16]
>>>

use list for 3.x support

6

If you are looking for range like function which works for float type, then here is a very good article.

def frange(start, stop, step=1.0):
    ''' "range()" like function which accept float type''' 
    i = start
    while i < stop:
        yield i
        i += step
# Generate one element at a time.
# Preferred when you don't need all generated elements at the same time. 
# This will save memory.
for i in frange(1.0, 2.0, 0.5):
    print i   # Use generated element.
# Generate all elements at once.
# Preferred when generated list ought to be small.
print list(frange(1.0, 10.0, 0.5))    

Output:

1.0
1.5
[1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, 7.5, 8.0, 8.5, 9.0, 9.5]
1
  • Why not the one-liner instead? start = 2; step =1; end = 10; z= np.array(range(start*step,step*end))/step; print(z)
    – Mohd
    Nov 11, 2020 at 10:02
6

Use list comprehension in python. Since you want 16 in the list too.. Use x2+1. Range function excludes the higher limit in the function.

list=[x for x in range(x1, x2+1)]
4
  • 3
    If you use range() no need to use a list comprehension Apr 17, 2018 at 10:59
  • @BillalBegueradj In Python3, range() returns a generator-like object instead of a list. It's basically the same as xrange() in Python 2. You're right that list comprehension isn't needed. The list() builtin function is easier: list(range(x1, x2+1)). Jan 19, 2020 at 5:14
  • @MikeHousky no, range is absolutely not a generator-like object. It is a sequence type object. Unless you want to do things like append to the sequence, you can probably just use the range object directly. Oct 19, 2021 at 15:37
  • 1
    Using a list-comprehension here is pointless. [x for x in whatever] should always just be list(whatever) Oct 19, 2021 at 15:37
5

In python you can do this very eaisly

start=0
end=10
arr=list(range(start,end+1))
output: arr=[0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]

or you can create a recursive function that returns an array upto a given number:

ar=[]
def diff(start,end):
    if start==end:
        d.append(end)
        return ar
    else:
        ar.append(end)
        return diff(start-1,end) 

output: ar=[10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0]

5

I got here because I wanted to create a range between -10 and 10 in increments of 0.1 using list comprehension. Instead of doing an overly complicated function like most of the answers above I just did this

simple_range = [ x*0.1 for x in range(-100, 100) ]

By changing the range count to 100 I now get my range of -10 through 10 by using the standard range function. So if you need it by 0.2 then just do range(-200, 200) and so on etc

3

The most elegant way to do this is by using the range function however if you want to re-create this logic you can do something like this :

def custom_range(*args):
    s = slice(*args)
    start, stop, step = s.start, s.stop, s.step
    if 0 == step:
        raise ValueError("range() arg 3 must not be zero")
    i = start
    while i < stop if step > 0 else i > stop:
        yield i
        i += step

>>> [x for x in custom_range(10, 3, -1)]

This produces the output:

[10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4]

As expressed before by @Jared, the best way is to use the range or numpy.arrange however I find the code interesting to be shared.

2
  • list(custom_range(10,3,1)) returns empty list. Jan 11, 2018 at 11:33
  • indeed, like [x for x in range(10, 3, 1)] - the first argument is the start, the second the end and the last the step. ==> stop > start
    – Michael
    Jan 11, 2018 at 11:37
3

Every answer above assumes range is of positive numbers only. Here is the solution to return list of consecutive numbers where arguments can be any (positive or negative), with the possibility to set optional step value (default = 1).

def any_number_range(a,b,s=1):
""" Generate consecutive values list between two numbers with optional step (default=1)."""
if (a == b):
    return a
else:
    mx = max(a,b)
    mn = min(a,b)
    result = []
    # inclusive upper limit. If not needed, delete '+1' in the line below
    while(mn < mx + 1):
        # if step is positive we go from min to max
        if s > 0:
            result.append(mn)
            mn += s
        # if step is negative we go from max to min
        if s < 0:
            result.append(mx)
            mx += s
    return result

For instance, standard command list(range(1,-3)) returns empty list [], while this function will return [-3,-2,-1,0,1]

Updated: now step may be negative. Thanks @Michael for his comment.

5
  • 1
    This assumes your step is positive.
    – Michael
    Jan 10, 2018 at 13:55
  • @Michael, good point. I've updated the code, so now you can have negative steps :) Jan 11, 2018 at 11:11
  • @tgikal, that's right. But what if you don't know what values will be assigned to the arguments of your function and you need sorted return? Sep 6, 2018 at 6:15
  • I don't see any additional features your custom function does that cannot be accomplished using the builtin range function, I guess an example of the improvement would be great, since your current example is basically i_min = -3, i_max = 1 any_number_range(i_max, i_min)) returns [-3,-2,-1,0,1] But, builtin list(range(i_min, i_max + 1)) will return the same values.
    – tgikal
    Sep 6, 2018 at 20:43
  • Try using a negative step when the sequence is decreasing list(range(1,-3, -1)) Jul 17, 2019 at 8:04
3

While @Jared's answer for incrementing works for 0.5 step size, it fails for other step sizes due to rounding issues:

np.arange(11, 17, 0.1).tolist()
# [11.0,11.1,11.2,11.299999999999999, ...   16.79999999999998, 16.899999999999977]

Instead I needed something like this myself, working not just for 0.5:

# Example 11->16 step 0.5
s = 11
e = 16
step = 0.5
my_list = [round(num, 2) for num in np.linspace(s,e,(e-s)*int(1/step)+1).tolist()]
# [11.0, 11.5, 12.0, 12.5, 13.0, 13.5, 14.0, 14.5, 15.0, 15.5, 16.0]

# Example 0->1 step 0.1
s = 0
e = 1
step = 0.1
my_list = [round(num, 2) for num in np.linspace(s,e,(e-s)*int(1/step)+1).tolist()]
# [0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1.0]
0

@YTZ's answer worked great in my case. I had to generate a list from 0 to 10000 with a step of 0.01 and simply adding 0.01 at each iteration did not work due to rounding issues.

Therefore, I used @YTZ's advice and wrote the following function:

import numpy as np


def generate_floating_numbers_in_range(start: int, end: int, step: float):
    """
    Generate a list of floating numbers within a specified range.

    :param start: range start
    :param end: range end
    :param step: range step
    :return:
    """
    numbers = np.linspace(start, end,(end-start)*int(1/step)+1).tolist()
    return [round(num, 2) for num in numbers]

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