208

I need to choose some elements from the given list, knowing their index. Let say I would like to create a new list, which contains element with index 1, 2, 5, from given list [-2, 1, 5, 3, 8, 5, 6]. What I did is:

a = [-2,1,5,3,8,5,6]
b = [1,2,5]
c = [ a[i] for i in b]

Is there any better way to do it? something like c = a[b] ?

197

You can use operator.itemgetter:

from operator import itemgetter 
a = [-2, 1, 5, 3, 8, 5, 6]
b = [1, 2, 5]
print(itemgetter(*b)(a))
# Result:
(1, 5, 5)

Or you can use numpy:

import numpy as np
a = np.array([-2, 1, 5, 3, 8, 5, 6])
b = [1, 2, 5]
print(list(a[b]))
# Result:
[1, 5, 5]

But really, your current solution is fine. It's probably the neatest out of all of them.

  • 31
    +1 for mentioning that c = [a[i] for i in b] is perfectly fine. Note that the itemgetter solution will not do the same thing if b has less than 2 elements. – flornquake Aug 16 '13 at 11:35
  • Side Note: Using itemgetter while working in multi-process doesn't work. Numpy works great in multi-process. – Lior Magen Mar 29 '16 at 10:26
  • 2
    Additional comment, a[b] works only when a is a numpy array, i.e. you create it with a numpy function. – Ludwig Zhou Aug 7 '17 at 9:11
  • I have benchmarked the non numpy options and itemgetter appears to be the fastest, even slightly faster than simply typing out the desired indexes inside parentheses, using Python 3.44 – ragardner Oct 16 '17 at 9:42
  • @citizen2077, can you give an example of the syntax you describe? – alancalvitti Jan 7 '19 at 19:05
43

Alternatives:

>>> map(a.__getitem__, b)
[1, 5, 5]

>>> import operator
>>> operator.itemgetter(*b)(a)
(1, 5, 5)
  • the first one is nice because you use build-in functions – silgon Oct 24 '18 at 14:32
  • The problem w/ the first one is that __getitem__ doesn't seem to be compasable eg how to map the type of the item? map(type(a.__getitem__), b) – alancalvitti Jan 7 '19 at 19:17
  • @alancalvitti, lambda x: type(a.__getitem__(x)), b. In this case using [..] is more compact: lambda x: type(a[x]), b – falsetru Jan 8 '19 at 0:01
8

Another solution could be via pandas Series:

import pandas as pd

a = pd.Series([-2, 1, 5, 3, 8, 5, 6])
b = [1, 2, 5]
c = a[b]

You can then convert c back to a list if you want:

c = list(c)
4

Basic and not very extensive testing comparing the execution time of the five supplied answers:

def numpyIndexValues(a, b):
    na = np.array(a)
    nb = np.array(b)
    out = list(na[nb])
    return out

def mapIndexValues(a, b):
    out = map(a.__getitem__, b)
    return list(out)

def getIndexValues(a, b):
    out = operator.itemgetter(*b)(a)
    return out

def pythonLoopOverlap(a, b):
    c = [ a[i] for i in b]
    return c

multipleListItemValues = lambda searchList, ind: [searchList[i] for i in ind]

using the following input:

a = range(0, 10000000)
b = range(500, 500000)

simple python loop was the quickest with lambda operation a close second, mapIndexValues and getIndexValues were consistently pretty similar with numpy method significantly slower after converting lists to numpy arrays.If data is already in numpy arrays the numpyIndexValues method with the numpy.array conversion removed is quickest.

numpyIndexValues -> time:1.38940598 (when converted the lists to numpy arrays)
numpyIndexValues -> time:0.0193445 (using numpy array instead of python list as input, and conversion code removed)
mapIndexValues -> time:0.06477512099999999
getIndexValues -> time:0.06391049500000001
multipleListItemValues -> time:0.043773591
pythonLoopOverlap -> time:0.043021754999999995
  • I do not know what Python interpreter you use but the first method numpyIndexValues does not work since a, b are of type range. I am guessing that you ment to convert a, b to numpy.ndarrays first? – strpeter Oct 14 '15 at 8:21
  • @strpeter Yes I was wasn't comparing apples with apples, I had created numpy arrays as input in the test case for the numpyIndexValues. I have fixed this now and all use the same lists as input. – Don Smythe Oct 18 '15 at 5:23
2

I'm sure this has already been considered: If the amount of indices in b is small and constant, one could just write the result like:

c = [a[b[0]]] + [a[b[1]]] + [a[b[2]]]

Or even simpler if the indices itself are constants...

c = [a[1]] + [a[2]] + [a[5]]

Or if there is a consecutive range of indices...

c = a[1:3] + [a[5]]
  • Thank you for reminding me that [a] + [b] = [a, b] – onewhaleid May 3 '17 at 23:57
2

Here's a simpler way:

a = [-2,1,5,3,8,5,6]
b = [1,2,5]
c = [e for i, e in enumerate(a) if i in b]
1

My answer does not use numpy or python collections.

One trivial way to find elements would be as follows:

a = [-2, 1, 5, 3, 8, 5, 6]
b = [1, 2, 5]
c = [i for i in a if i in b]

Drawback: This method may not work for larger lists. Using numpy is recommended for larger lists.

  • 5
    No need to iterate a. [a[i] for i in b] – falsetru Sep 22 '14 at 12:38
  • 1
    This method doesn't even work in any other case. What if a had another 5 in it? – TerryA Jul 21 '15 at 21:47
  • IMO, faster to do this sort of intersection using sets – sirgogo Mar 15 '17 at 21:13
  • If you are worried about IndexErrors if b has numbers that exceed a's size, try [a[i] if i<len(a) else None for i in b] – 576i Aug 9 '18 at 9:23
0

Static indexes and small list?

Don't forget that if the list is small and the indexes don't change, as in your example, sometimes the best thing is to use sequence unpacking:

_,a1,a2,_,_,a3,_ = a

The performance is much better and you can also save one line of code:

 %timeit _,a1,b1,_,_,c1,_ = a
10000000 loops, best of 3: 154 ns per loop 
%timeit itemgetter(*b)(a)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 753 ns per loop
 %timeit [ a[i] for i in b]
1000000 loops, best of 3: 777 ns per loop
 %timeit map(a.__getitem__, b)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.42 µs per loop

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