38

I am writing a script that will require me to add lines in a specific part of a config file. For example

Before:

ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=unreal.epicgames.com MasterServerPort=27900
ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=master0.gamespy.com MasterServerPort=27900
ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=master.mplayer.com MasterServerPort=27900
ServerActors=UWeb.WebServer

After:

ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=unreal.epicgames.com MasterServerPort=27900
ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=master0.gamespy.com MasterServerPort=27900
ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=master.mplayer.com MasterServerPort=27900
ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=master.qtracker.com MasterServerPort=27900
ServerActors=UWeb.WebServer

As you can see there is a new line added. How can my bash script insert the line? I'm guessing I will need to use sed.

  • There are multiple ways and languages to do so, probably awk and sed being the best ones. Should you indicate the logic in these lines addition, so we can help solving it. – fedorqui Aug 16 '13 at 11:34
  • It's hard to infer a rule from one complicated case. Do you want to insert ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=master.qtracker.com MasterServerPort=27900 above every mention of WebServer? Or follow every mplayer line with a corresponding qtracker line, or what? – Beta Aug 16 '13 at 11:36
  • I think I found an answer. Not sure if there is a better way. But I have simply put in sed replace mplayer line with mplayer line newline qtracker line sed -i 's/ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=master.mplayer.com MasterServerPort=27900/ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=master.mplayer.com MasterServerPort=27900\nServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=master.qtracker.com MasterServerPort=27900/g' /tmp/test Its a little long but it seems to work. – dgibbs Aug 16 '13 at 11:54
  • or to simplyfy sed -i 's/line3/line3\nline5/g' /tmp/test – dgibbs Aug 16 '13 at 12:02
  • @dgibbs,that's usually how I do - replace string before/after I want to insert keeping original in there and adding the new thing. – akostadinov Aug 16 '13 at 14:36
83

If you want to add a line after a specific string match:

$ awk '/master.mplayer.com/ { print; print "new line"; next }1' foo.input
ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=unreal.epicgames.com MasterServerPort=27900
ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=master0.gamespy.com MasterServerPort=27900
ServerActors=IpServer.UdpServerUplink MasterServerAddress=master.mplayer.com MasterServerPort=27900
new line
ServerActors=UWeb.WebServer
  • 3
    I wonder why this didn't get more up votes, it's a way more dynamic way of handling the solution than explicitly knowing the line number your search text is on. +1 from me – sadmicrowave Apr 15 '14 at 18:04
  • 1
    This is a better answer than the accepted one because it will reliably persist even if something else interacts with the file in question. e.g. I was using this on a Docker build of an nginx container and if someone were to add some config to it elsewhere, the accepted answer would break the build. This will not. – samtresler Feb 25 '15 at 21:19
  • 2
    Why doesn't piping this back into the same file work? awk ... foo.input > foo.input just empties that file – Andy Ray Jul 1 '16 at 22:43
  • 3
    @AndyRay Because shell redirection happens before any commands are run, which means the file is truncated immediately. See also this answer. The only way around this is using a temporary file, which for example sed -i does transparently. There's also sponge from moreutils which solves this problem. – Adrian Frühwirth Jul 2 '16 at 22:32
  • It shows the expected output, but how to add that output to the file? File is unchanged – Syed Asad Ali Jun 11 '18 at 10:57
27

You can use something like this:

Note that the command must be entered over multiple lines because sed does not allow coding a newline with "\n" or the Ctrl-V/Ctrl-M key combination like some tools. The backslash says "Ignore my hitting the return key, I'm not done with my command yet".

sed -i.bak '4i\
This is the new line\
' filename

This should do the trick (It will insert it between line 3 and 4).

If you want to put this command itself into a shell script, you have to escape the backslashes so they don't get eaten by bash and fail to get passed to sed. Inside a script, the command becomes:

sed -i.bak '4i\\
This is the new line\\
' filename
  • 1
    I see so you are specifying the line number – dgibbs Aug 16 '13 at 12:04
  • Yes, that way you can point precisely to where you want the line to be added. – MPrazz Aug 16 '13 at 12:14
  • another sed option similar to above would be sed '3a\ This is the new line' file – user1502952 Aug 16 '13 at 12:23
  • 2
    what is .bak stands for ? – Vivek Feb 15 '15 at 7:15
  • 1
    .bak means you want to create a backup with extension ".bak". You could use .foo if you like and then the original file will be saved with name filename.foo – Dave Griffiths Feb 18 '15 at 16:53
13
awk 'NR==5{print "new line text"}7' file
  • 3
    sorry, for what is 7 here? ( ..."}7 ) – setevoy Jan 23 '14 at 11:14
  • 1
    @setevoy it will apply the default action of awk: print. – Kent Apr 16 '14 at 7:59
  • get downvoted, because....? – Kent Apr 16 '14 at 8:00
  • @Kent Must be a bond lover. But like you said bond should use 007 if he using awk so +1. ;)! – jaypal singh Apr 16 '14 at 16:54
  • 6
    If anyone else is confused, the 7 in this example can be any value that evaluates true. This is so that Awk knows to print every line. If there were no value there, then only the matched line (#5 in this case) would generate output ("new line text" in this case). – pieman72 Apr 29 '14 at 7:50
2

You can add it with sed in your file filename after a certain string pattern match with:

sed '/pattern/a some text here' filename

in your example

sed '/master.mplayer.com/a \  new line' filename

(The backslash masks the first space in the new line, so you can add more spaces at the start)

source: https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/121166/20661

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