12

Background: I have a timer that I am using to keep track of how long it has been since the serialPort DataReceived event has been fired. I am creating my own solution to this instead of using the built in timeout event because I am getting a continuous stream of data, instead of sending a query and getting one response.

The Problem: In the DataReceived handler I have a statement to stop the timer so that is doesn't elapse. the problem is that a lot of the time it still executes the Elapsed handler afterword.

I have read that is is possible to use SynchronizingObject to solve this problem but I am not sure how to accomplish that.

Here is my code: I tried to cut out everything that I didn't think was relevant.

    private System.Timers.Timer timeOut;
    private System.Timers.Timer updateTimer;

    public void start()
    {
        thread1 = new Thread(() => record());

        thread1.Start();
    }

    public void requestStop()
    {
        this.stop = true;
        this.WaitEventTest.Set();

    }

    private void record()
    {
        timeOut = new System.Timers.Timer(500); //** .5 Sec
        updateTimer = new System.Timers.Timer(500); //** .5 Sec

        timeOut.Elapsed += TimeOut_Elapsed;
        updateTimer.Elapsed += updateTimer_Elapsed;
        updateTimer.AutoReset = true;


        comport.Open();
        comport.DiscardInBuffer();


        comport.Write(COMMAND_CONTINUOUSMODE + "\r");

        stopwatch.Reset();
        stopwatch.Start();

        recordingStartTrigger(); //** Fire Recording Started Event

        timeOut.Start();
        updateTimer.Start();

        this.waitHandleTest.WaitOne(); //** wait for test to end

        timeOut.Stop();
        updateTimer.Stop();

        comport.Write(COMMAND_COMMANDMODE + Environment.NewLine);
        comport.DiscardInBuffer();
        comport.Close();
        recordingStopTrigger(status); //** Fire Recording Stopped Event

        stopwatch.Stop();
    }


    //***********************************************************************************
    //** Events Handlers


    private void comDataReceived_Handler(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
    {

        double force = -100000;
        string temp = "-100000";

        //timeOut.SynchronizingObject.Invoke(new Action(()=> {timeOut.Stop();}), new object[] {sender, e});

        timeOut.Stop();

        //** I removed my action code here, keep things simple.


        timeOut.Start();
    }

    private void TimeOut_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        timeOut.Stop();
        updateTimer.Stop();


        //** fire delegate that GUI will be listening to, to update graph.
        if (eventComTimeOut != null && this.stop == false)
        {
            if (eventComTimeOut(this, new eventArgsComTimeOut(comport.PortName, "READ")))
            {
                //retry = true;
                comport.Write(COMMAND_CONTINUOUSMODE + "\r");
                updateTimer.Start();
                timeOut.Start();
            }
            else
            {
                this.stop = true;
                //retry = false;
                this.WaitEventTest.Set();
                status = eventArgsStopped.Status.failed;                     
            }
        }
    }

    void updateTimer_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {

        //** fire delegate that GUI will be listening to, to update graph.
        List<Reading> temp = new List<Reading>(report.Readings_Force);
        eventNewData(this, new eventArgsNewData(temp));

    }
30

This is well known behavior. System.Timers.Timer internally uses ThreadPool for execution. Runtime will queue the Timer in threadpool. It would have already queued before you have called Stop method. It will fire at the elapsed time.

To avoid this happening set Timer.AutoReset to false and start the timer back in the elapsed handler if you need one. Setting AutoReset false makes timer to fire only once, so in order to get timer fired on interval manually start timer again.

yourTimer.AutoReset = false;

private void Timer_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
     try
     {
         // add your logic here
     }
     finally
     {
         yourTimer.Enabled = true;// or yourTimer.Start();
     }
}
  • 2
    @Downvoter any comment? – Sriram Sakthivel Nov 20 '13 at 11:53
  • What is the reason for adding the try finally? – mike james Apr 17 '14 at 21:33
  • 5
    @mikejames In try block you'll add your logic, even in case of exceptions finally block will ensure that yourTimer will start again. – Sriram Sakthivel Apr 18 '14 at 8:14
  • 1
    @HilalAl-Rajhi System.Timers.Timer have a property named AutoReset – Sriram Sakthivel Sep 23 '16 at 16:30
  • 1
    this is not answering the question. the problem is how to stop the timer correctly, not to prevent AutoReset. – dqshll Dec 14 '18 at 2:19
2

I did a pause in timer with this code. for me that works.

Private cTimer As New System.Timers.Timer
Private Sub inittimer()
    cTimer.AutoReset = True
    cTimer.Interval = 1000
    AddHandler cTimer.Elapsed, AddressOf cTimerTick
    cTimer.Enabled = True
End Sub

Private Sub cTimerTick()
    If cTimer.AutoReset = True Then
       'do your code if not paused by autoreset false
    End If
End Sub
0

Had the same problem and after some trying ended up with timer object to null and replace the timer variable it with a new timer object fixed the issue. I know its heavy of resources. But it solves the problem.

  • This did not work for me. – Tal Segal Jun 2 at 13:47

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