7

The following code in Java uses recursion to create all possible substrings from a string. I am wondering is there a better way of coding this? I want to use recursion.

public class main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        generate("hello");
    }

    public static void generate(String word) {
        if (word.length() == 1) {
            System.out.println(word);
            return;
        }else{
            System.out.println(word);
            generate(word.substring(0, word.length()-1)); 
            generate(word.substring(1, word.length())); 
        }

    }

}

FAQ Q - Why do I want to do this using recursion? A - Because the CEO of StackOverflow says recursion is important http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/ThePerilsofJavaSchools.html

9
  • 2
    You want to use recursion and you have a working solution that uses recursion? I don't see the problem.
    – Kayaman
    Commented Aug 16, 2013 at 19:11
  • Looks about as efficient and clean as a recursive program of that nature should be.
    – ug_
    Commented Aug 16, 2013 at 19:11
  • 2
    Your method is fine, but another recursive way and the way I would think about it is, since your substrings are single-consecutive pieces of the main string, you're dealing with two integer variables: a starting position and an ending position. So you're essentially finding combinations thereof. For example, with the word "Hello" of length 5, you have a Starting/Ending positions of: 1/5, 2/5, 3/5, 4/5, 1/4, 2/4, 3/4, etc
    – Kon
    Commented Aug 16, 2013 at 19:11
  • @Kayaman, yes I have a working solution, just want to see if there is any better way of doing it, Im not a recursion expert.
    – davidjhp
    Commented Aug 16, 2013 at 19:12
  • 1
    @Marko, yes I realize recursion is a bad fit for Java, just want to practice recursion skills because of this joelonsoftware.com/articles/ThePerilsofJavaSchools.html
    – davidjhp
    Commented Aug 16, 2013 at 19:16

12 Answers 12

15

This problem has overlapping subproblems and because of that the top-down recursion as you do is not much effective. You are evaluating multiple substrings multiple times.

Actually it is horribly ineffective (I would guess O(2^n)). Just try to run it on a bit longer string.

generate("OverlappingSubproblems");

If you are interested in a better way of solving this you can try something like this:

public static void generate2(String word) {
    for (int from = 0; from < word.length(); from++) {
        for (int to = from + 1; to <= word.length(); to++) {
            System.out.println(word.substring(from, to));
        }
    }
}

If you want to use recursion you can try to rewrite the for-loops with recursion as exercise ;)

7
  • Isn't the solution you posted n^2 too?
    – rounak
    Commented Jun 9, 2014 at 22:24
  • 4
    Yes, it is n^2, but the other solution is 2^n. Commented Jun 10, 2014 at 6:28
  • 1
    Ah, got confused between the two
    – rounak
    Commented Jun 10, 2014 at 10:17
  • 3
    This solutions doesn't produce all the possible combinations of the characters in the string.
    – user3003961
    Commented Jul 5, 2014 at 8:42
  • 2
    We are looking for substrings not combinations
    – zad
    Commented Jul 15, 2016 at 18:09
8

The following turned out to be the best solution:

public class recursive {

    static String in = "1234";

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        substrings(0,1);
    }

    static void substrings(int start, int end){
        if(start == in.length() && end == in.length()){
            return;
        }else{
            if(end == in.length()+1){
                substrings(start+1,start+1);
            }else{
                System.out.println(in.substring(start, end));
                substrings(start, end+1);
            }
        }
    }

}

It first checks the base case: if both start and end are equal to in.length(). Because if they are, that means there are no more substrings to be found, and the program ends.

Let's start with start=0 and end=1. They obviously don't equal in.length(), and end definitely doesn't equal in.length()+1. Thus, substring(0,1) will be printed out, which is 1. The next iteration of substrings will be substrings(0,2), and in.substring(0,2) will be printed, which is 12. This will continue until end == in.length()+1, which happens when the program finishes substrings(0,4) and tries to move on to substrings(0,5). 5 == in.length()+1, so when that happens, the program will do substrings(start+1,start+1), which is substrings(1,1). The process will continue with substrings(1,2), and (1,3), until (1,5) when the program will run substrings(2,2).

All of this will continue until substrings(4,4), which, at that point, the program stops.

The result looks like this:

1 12 123 1234

2 23 234

3 34

4

2
  • well explained. Can you please explain on time & spae complexity of your solution ? will it be O(nlogn) for time ?
    – Harshit
    Commented Apr 19, 2015 at 3:48
  • 1
    System.out.println(in.substring(start, end)); -- this line prints empty strings when start = end. It should be executed only when start != end, something like if (start != end) { System.out.println(str.substring(start, end)); }
    – prashant
    Commented May 3, 2018 at 20:14
2

There is a lot to be learned from Honza's answer.I suggest you try and rewrite that as a recursive algorithm.

As with any recursive approach, divide it into self-referencing subproblems:

1. substrings(X) = substrings_starting_at_first_character(X) + substrings(X minus first char).
2. substrings_starting_at_first_character(X) = X + substrings_starting_at_first_character(X minus last char).

Next figure out your non-self-referencing base cases:

1. substrings("") = empty set.
2. substrings_starting_at_first_character("") = empty set.

And go from there.

0

Another clean approach - using both looping and recursion (and does not have overlapping problem)

public static void printCombinations(String initial, String combined) {
    System.out.print(combined + " ");
    for (int i = 0; i < initial.length(); i++) {
        printCombinations(initial.substring(i + 1),
                combined + initial.charAt(i));

    }
}


public static void main(String[] args) {
        printCombinations("12345", "");
    }

And output is - 1 12 123 1234 12345 1235 124 1245 125 13 134 1345 135 14 145 15 2 23 234 2345 235 24 245 25 3 34 345 35 4 45 5

1
  • 3
    14,15,.. are not substring. Your solution is giving all combinations that can be made using chars in the string...
    – Madhusudan
    Commented Apr 17, 2016 at 9:31
0
 //substring all the words from a string
  public class RecSubstring
  {
    static int c=0; 
    static void rec(String str)
    {
      if(str.equals(""))
        return;
      else
      {
        c=str.indexOf(' ');  
        System.out.println(str.substring(0,c));
        rec(str.substring(c+1));
     }
   }

  public static void main(String args[])
  {
    String st="We are Happy"+" " ;
    rec(st);
  }
 }
0
public class SubsequencesOfStr {

 public static void main(String[] args) {

  String str = "abcd";
  System.out.println("0000----" + str.length());
  linearCombination(str);
 }

 static void linearCombination(String str) {
  for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
   int endIndex = i + 1;
   for (int j = 0; j < str.length() - i; j++) {
    System.out.println(str.substring(j, endIndex));
    endIndex++;
   }
  }
 }
}
0
void allsubstring(string s,int start,int end)
{
if(start == s.size() &&  end == s.size()) {
    return;
}
else {
    if(end == s.size()) {
        allsubstring(s,start+1,start+1);
    }
    else {
        cout<<s.substr(start,end-start+1)<<endl;
        allsubstring(s,start,end+1);
    }
}

}

0

another approach using Recursion

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        subStrings("ABCDE");        
    }
    
    static void subStrings(String str) 
    {
        if(str.length()==0)
        {
            return;
        }
        subString(str);
        subStrings(str.substring(1,str.length()));
        
    }
    
    private static void subString(String str)
    {
        if(str.length()==1)
        {
            System.out.print(str+" ");
            return;
        }
        
        System.out.print(str+" ");
        subString(str.substring(0,str.length()-1));
        
    }
 
0

Here is my approach employing 2 recursive functions pss and pss1 to mimic the outer and inner for loops respectively of the standard O(n^2) solution. Only this time, recursively đź‘Ť.

output for abc : a,ab,abc,b,bc,c

// print substrings using recursion

void pss1 ( string s , int i , string op)
{
    // pss1 prints all substrings from a given index
 if(i==s.length()-1)
    {
        op+=s[i];
        cout<<op<<endl;
        return;
    }
     op+=s[i];
     cout<<op<<endl;
     pss1(s,i+1,op);

}
void pss ( string s , int i , string op)
{
    // pss repeats the process of pss1 for all indices by reducing the string size by 1 each time from the front (i.e) abc becomes bc at the 2nd call of psss
    if(s.length()==1)
    {
        cout<<s<<endl;
        return;
    }
    else
    {
            pss1(s,0,op);

        string S=s.substr(1);
        pss(S,0,"");

    }
    return ;
}


int main()
{
    string s;
    cin>>s;
    pss(s,0,"");
    return 0;
}
0

Here is the working code using 1 recursive function only.

An implementation of @davidjhp's solution in c++

Analyze the Recursive stack Diagram in recursive problems to understand how the given problem is solved for smaller problems to yield the final solution.

// Print SubStrings using recursion 

void pss(string s, int start, int end)
{
    if(start==s.length()-1)
    {
        cout<<s.substr(start)<<endl;
        return;
    }
    if(end==s.length()+1)
    {
        start++;
        end=start+1;
        pss(s,start,end);
    }
    else if( start<=s.length()&&end<=s.length())
    {
        cout<<s.substr(start,end-start)<<endl;
        pss(s,start,end+1);
    }
}


 int main()
{
 string s;
 cin>>s;
 pss(s,0,1); 
 return 0;
}
0
#include <bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;

/*
In Subsequence: If we take an element then we can take another element after k skips. (where k>=0)
In Substring: If we take an element then we can only take adjacent element after it. (i.e. no skips)
*/

void substring(string &s, string &res, int prevIndex, int currIndex)
{
  if(currIndex==s.size())
  {
    cout<<res<<endl;
    return;
  }
  if(prevIndex==-1 || currIndex-prevIndex==1)
  {
    res+=s[currIndex];
    substring(s,res,currIndex,currIndex+1);
    res.pop_back();
  }
  substring(s,res,prevIndex,currIndex+1);
}

int main()
{
  string s="abcde", res;
  substring(s,res,-1,0);
}
0

My approach using recursion. It creates a sort of binary tree if you deeply understand how the code works: (Note: The value of String ans will be set to ""(null) in the main method)

static void subStr(String str, String ans)    // ans="" (in main method)
{
    if(str.length() == 0){
        System.out.print(ans);
    }

    char ch = str.charAt(0);
    String ros = str.substring(1);

    subStr(ros, ans);
    subStr(ros, ans+ch);
}
2
  • Don't use == for string comparisons.
    – tgdavies
    Commented Jul 18, 2023 at 23:08
  • @tgdavies Okay, will use str.length()==0
    – DarkLord
    Commented Jul 19, 2023 at 21:19

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