1

Without a doubt I know what the controllers and models are used for. However, I am able to write code that interacts with my db, for example adding users to a table, on either the controller or model. At what times should I write code in the controller vs. in model? Even though both work, what would be a more organized or practical way. Could you please post examples if the answer is ambiguous?Thx

  • 1
    "Without a doubt I know what the controllers and models are used for"... sorts of makes the question redundant, no? – Lews Therin Aug 16 '13 at 22:13
4

For that, you should add a logic layer or logic classes. The controller should determine wants to do and can do, shuffle them in the right direction (logic layer), then determine what to show the user after the logic. Putting the logic in a separate layer will help keep your controllers lean and promote code reuse.

In the domain core, we only have models with properties. All logic is performed in a different layer, except for things like a property that returns fields concatenated in a format.

  • Very good answer, as you say your approach promotes DRY as well as the ability to add other mechanisms, such as Singleton over Session/Application storage as well as worker pattern if you so wish. I added my $0.10 with an edit that reinforces your assertion of the role of the controller, I hope you don't mind. – Moby's Stunt Double Aug 17 '13 at 1:54
4

Code to access the database should be in service layer instead of keeping in Controller or Model.

Accessing Database Entities from Controller

Here is my answer for the above question, you can also read others answers why you should keep in separate layer.

namespace MyProject.Web.Controllers
{
   public class MyController : Controller
   {
      private readonly IKittenService _kittenService ;

      public MyController(IKittenService kittenService)
      {
         _kittenService = kittenService;
      }

      public ActionResult Kittens()
      {
          // var result = _kittenService.GetLatestKittens(10);
          // Return something.
      }
   }  
}

namespace MyProject.Domain.Kittens
{
   public class Kitten
   {
      public string Name {get; set; }
      public string Url {get; set; }
   }
}

namespace MyProject.Services.KittenService
{
   public interface IKittenService
   {
       IEnumerable<Kitten> GetLatestKittens(int fluffinessIndex=10);
   }
}

namespace MyProject.Services.KittenService
{
   public class KittenService : IKittenService
   {
      public IEnumerable<Kitten> GetLatestKittens(int fluffinessIndex=10)
      {
         using(var db = new KittenEntities())
         {
            return db.Kittens // this explicit query is here
                      .Where(kitten=>kitten.fluffiness > 10) 
                      .Select(kitten=>new {
                            Name=kitten.name,
                            Url=kitten.imageUrl
                      }).Take(10); 
         }
      }
   }
}
  • Did you mean Where(kitten=>kitten.fluffiness >= fluffinessIndex)? :) – Tieson T. Aug 17 '13 at 5:50
  • @TiesonT. Good catch. I just copied the code from the original question for demo. ;) – Win Aug 19 '13 at 2:40
3

ASP.NET MVC and MVC, in general, is a presentation layer pattern; thus your interaction with the database should be in a layer beyond the presentation layer, usually a data-access layer, but it could be a service layer or business layer as well.

0

If you are a beginner, this will help you understand the difference between controllers and models. http://www.asp.net/mvc/tutorials/mvc-music-store/mvc-music-store-part-2
http://www.asp.net/mvc/tutorials/mvc-music-store/mvc-music-store-part-4

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