27

I have two projects in my solution: WPF project and class library.

In my class library:

I have a List of Symbol:

class Symbol
{
     Identifier Identifier {get;set;}
     List<Quote> HistoricalQuotes {get;set;}
     List<Financial> HistoricalFinancials {get;set;}
}

For each symbol, I query a financial service to retrieve historical financial data for each one of my symbols using a webrequest. (webClient.DownloadStringTaskAsync(uri);)

So here's my method which do that:

    public async Task<IEnumerable<Symbol>> GetSymbolsAsync()
    {
        var historicalFinancialTask = new List<Task<HistoricalFinancialResult>>();

        foreach (var symbol in await _listSymbols)
        {
            historicalFinancialTask.Add(GetFinancialsQueryAsync(symbol));
        }

        while (historicalFinancialTask.Count > 0)
        {
            var historicalFinancial = await Task.WhenAny(historicalFinancialTask);
            historicalFinancialTask.Remove(historicalFinancial);

            // the line below doesn't compile, which is understandable because method's return type is a Task of something
            yield return new Symbol(historicalFinancial.Result.Symbol.Identifier, historicalFinancial.Result.Symbol.HistoricalQuotes, historicalFinancial.Result.Data); 
        }
    }

    private async Task<HistoricalFinancialResult> GetFinancialsQueryAsync(Symbol symbol)
    {
        var result = new HistoricalFinancialResult();
        result.Symbol = symbol;
        result.Data = await _financialsQuery.GetFinancialsQuery(symbol.Identifier); // contains some logic like parsing and use WebClient to query asynchronously
        return result;
    }

    private class HistoricalFinancialResult
    {
        public Symbol Symbol { get; set; }
        public IEnumerable<Financial> Data { get; set; }

        // equality members
    }

As you can see, I want that each time I download a Financial historical data per symbol, to yield the result instead of waiting for all my calls to financial service to complete.

And in my WPF, here's what I would like to do:

foreach(var symbol in await _service.GetSymbolsAsync())
{
      SymbolsObservableCollection.Add(symbol);
}

It seems we can't yield return in an async method, then what solution can I use? Except moving my GetSymbols method into my WPF project.

  • BTW, to process a collection of Tasks by their order of completion, have a look at OrderByCompletion() from Nito AsyncEx. – svick Aug 17 '13 at 11:09
  • Have you looked at Reactive Extensions (Rx)? – Paulo Morgado Aug 19 '13 at 1:05
  • I have, but the lining curve is too high for me and actually I don't understand what Microsoft is planning on the future of this technology because they also have TPL Dataflow which looks kinda do the same thing. The problem I'm asking here is so simple, so the solution should be also simple. And I still don't understand why they don't include RX or Dataflow in the .NET Framework, it looks like even they don't trust enough these two frameworks to include them. – John Aug 20 '13 at 22:34
  • @Gui RX being separate is a growing trend in .NET the goal being letting users pick the parts they need instead of one big framework. It also allows them to iterate and provide new versions in isolation. – Daniel Little Dec 4 '13 at 1:01
41

While I like the TPL Dataflow components (which svick suggests you use), moving over to that system does require a substantial commitment - it's not something you can just add to an existing design. It offers considerable benefits if you're performing high volumes of CPU-intensive data processing and want to exploit many CPU cores. But getting the best out of it is non-trivial.

His other suggestion, using Rx, might be easier to integrate with an existing solution. (See the original documentation, but for the latest code, use the Rx-Main nuget package. Or if you'd like to look at the source, see the Rx CodePlex site) It would even be possible for the calling code to carry on using an IEnumerable<Symbol> if you want - you can use Rx purely as an implementation detail, [edit 2013/11/09 to add:] although as svick has pointed out, that's probably not a good idea, given your end goal.

Before I show you an example, I want to be clear about what exactly we're doing. Your example had a method with this signature:

public async Task<IEnumerable<Symbol>> GetSymbolsAsync()

That return type, Task<IEnumerable<Symbol>>, essentially says "This is a method that produces a single result of type IEnumerable<Symbol>, and it may not produce that result immediately."

It's that single result bit that I think is causing you grief, because that's not really what you want. A Task<T> (no matter what T may be) represents a single asynchronous operation. It may have many steps (many uses of await if you implement it as a C# async method) but ultimately it produces one thing. You want to produce multiple things, at different, times, so Task<T> is not a good fit.

If you were really going to do what your method signature promises - producing one result eventually - one way you could do this is to have your async method build a list and then produce that as the result when it's good and ready:

// Note: this first example is *not* what you want.
// However, it is what your method's signature promises to do.
public async Task<IEnumerable<Symbol>> GetSymbolsAsync()
{
    var historicalFinancialTask = new List<Task<HistoricalFinancialResult>>();

    foreach (var symbol in await _listSymbols)
    {
        historicalFinancialTask.Add(GetFinancialsQueryAsync(symbol));
    }

    var results = new List<Symbol>();
    while (historicalFinancialTask.Count > 0)
    {
        var historicalFinancial = await Task.WhenAny(historicalFinancialTask);
        historicalFinancialTask.Remove(historicalFinancial);

        results.Add(new Symbol(historicalFinancial.Result.Symbol.Identifier, historicalFinancial.Result.Symbol.HistoricalQuotes, historicalFinancial.Result.Data)); 
    }

    return results;
}

This method does what its signature says: it asynchronously produces a sequence of symbols.

But presumably you'd like to create an IEnumerable<Symbol> that produces the items as they become available, rather than waiting until they're all available. (Otherwise, you might as well just use WhenAll.) You can do that, but yield return is not the way.

In short, what I think you want to do is produce an asynchronous list. There's a type for that: IObservable<T> expresses exactly what I believe you were hoping to express with your Task<IEnumerable<Symbol>>: it's a sequence of items (just like IEnumerable<T>) but asynchronous.

It may help to understand it by analogy:

public Symbol GetSymbol() ...

is to

public Task<Symbol> GetSymbolAsync() ...

as

public IEnumerable<Symbol> GetSymbols() ...

is to:

public IObservable<Symbol> GetSymbolsObservable() ...

(Unfortunately, unlike with Task<T> there isn't a common naming convention for what to call an asynchronous sequence-oriented method. I've added 'Observable' on the end here, but that's not universal practice. I certainly wouldn't call it GetSymbolsAsync because people will expect that to return a Task.)

To put it another way, Task<IEnumerable<T>> says "I'll produce this collection when I'm good and ready" whereas IObservable<T> says: "Here's a collection. I'll produce each item when I'm good and ready."

So, you want a method that returns a sequence of Symbol objects, where those objects are produced asynchronously. That tells us that you should really be returning an IObservable<Symbol>. Here's an implementation:

// Unlike this first example, this *is* what you want.
public IObservable<Symbol> GetSymbolsRx()
{
    return Observable.Create<Symbol>(async obs =>
    {
        var historicalFinancialTask = new List<Task<HistoricalFinancialResult>>();

        foreach (var symbol in await _listSymbols)
        {
            historicalFinancialTask.Add(GetFinancialsQueryAsync(symbol));
        }

        while (historicalFinancialTask.Count > 0)
        {
            var historicalFinancial = await Task.WhenAny(historicalFinancialTask);
            historicalFinancialTask.Remove(historicalFinancial);

            obs.OnNext(new Symbol(historicalFinancial.Result.Symbol.Identifier, historicalFinancial.Result.Symbol.HistoricalQuotes, historicalFinancial.Result.Data));
        }
    });
}

As you can see, this lets you write pretty much what you were hoping to write - the body of this code is almost identical to yours. The only difference is that where you were using yield return (which didn't compile), this calls the OnNext method on an object supplied by Rx.

Having written that, you can easily wrap this in an IEnumerable<Symbol> ([Edited 2013/11/29 to add:] although you probably don't actually want to do this - see addition at end of answer):

public IEnumerable<Symbol> GetSymbols()
{
    return GetSymbolsRx().ToEnumerable();
}

This may not look asynchronous, but it does in fact allow the underlying code to operate asynchronously. When you call this method, it will not block - even if the underlying code that does the work of fetching the financial information cannot produce a result immediately, this method will nonetheless immediately return an IEnumerable<Symbol>. Now of course, any code that attempts to iterate through that collection will end up blocking if data is not yet available. But the critical thing is that does what I think you were originally trying to achieve:

  • You get to write an async method that does the work (a delegate in my example, passed as an argument to Observable.Create<T> but you could write a standalone async method if you prefer)
  • The calling code will not be blocked merely as result of asking you to start fetching the symbols
  • The resulting IEnumerable<Symbol> will produce each individual item as soon as it becomes available

This works because Rx's ToEnumerable method has some clever code in it that bridges the gap between the synchronous world view of IEnumerable<T> and asynchronous production of results. (In other words, this does exactly what you were disappointed to discover C# wasn't able to do for you.)

If you're curious, you can look at the source. The code that underlies what ToEnumerable does can be found at https://rx.codeplex.com/SourceControl/latest#Rx.NET/Source/System.Reactive.Linq/Reactive/Linq/Observable/GetEnumerator.cs

[Edited 2013/11/29 to add:]

svick has pointed out in the comments something I missed: your final goal is to put the contents into an ObservableCollection<Symbol>. Somehow I didn't see that bit. That means IEnumerable<T> is the wrong way to go - you want to populate the collection as items become available, rather than doing through with a foreach loop. So you'd just do this:

GetSymbolsRx().Subscribe(symbol => SymbolsObservableCollection.Add(symbol));

or something along those lines. That will add items to the collection as and when they become available.

This depends on the whole thing being kicked off on the UI thread by the way. As long as it is, your async code should end up running on the UI thread, meaning that when items are added to the collection, that also happens on the UI thread. But if for some reason you end up launching things from a worker thread (or if you were to use ConfigureAwait on any of the awaits, thus breaking the connection with the UI thread) you'd need to arrange to handle the items from the Rx stream on the right thread:

GetSymbolsRx()
    .ObserveOnDispatcher()
    .Subscribe(symbol => SymbolsObservableCollection.Add(symbol));

If you're on the UI thread when you do that, it'll pick up the current dispatcher, and ensure all notifications arrive through it. If you're already on the wrong thread when you come to subscribe, you can use the ObserveOn overload that takes a dispatcher. (These require you to have a reference to System.Reactive.Windows.Threading. And these are extension methods, so you'll need a using for their containing namespace, which is also called System.Reactive.Windows.Threading)

  • 4
    While I agree with most of the answer, I think that ToEnumerable() is not the right solution here. According to the question, the end goal is to fill ObservabaleCollection as items become available. Since normally you have to do that from the UI thread, using ToEnumerable() would force you to block the UI thread for the whole time. – svick Nov 29 '13 at 13:38
  • 1
    Don't know how I missed that - thanks. I've edited it in the light of your comment. – Ian Griffiths Nov 29 '13 at 14:16
  • 1
    +1 for your good well written answer and blog. This is how stacoverflow inspires me :) – Ravi Gadag Nov 30 '13 at 15:37
  • @IanGriffiths omg what an answer, I feel so honored. I think you convinced me that using Rx is the way to go. Thanks you very much for effort and time you have taken to answer me. – John Dec 21 '13 at 20:51
6

What you're asking for doesn't make much sense, because IEnumerable<T> is a synchronous interface. In other words, if an item is not available yet, the MoveNext() method has to block, it has no other choice.

What you need is some sort of asynchronous version of IEnumerable<T>. For that, you can use IObservable<T> from Rx or (my favorite) block from TPL dataflow. With that, your code could look like this (I have also changed some variables to better names):

public IReceivableSourceBlock<Symbol> GetSymbolsAsync()
{
    var block = new BufferBlock<Symbol>();

    GetSymbolsAsyncCore(block).ContinueWith(
        task => ((IDataflowBlock)block).Fault(task.Exception),
        TaskContinuationOptions.NotOnRanToCompletion);

    return block;
}

private async Task GetSymbolsAsyncCore(ITargetBlock<Symbol> block)
{
    // snip

    while (historicalFinancialTasks.Count > 0)
    {
        var historicalFinancialTask =
            await Task.WhenAny(historicalFinancialTasks);
        historicalFinancialTasks.Remove(historicalFinancialTask);
        var historicalFinancial = historicalFinancialTask.Result;

        var symbol = new Symbol(
            historicalFinancial.Symbol.Identifier,
            historicalFinancial.Symbol.HistoricalQuotes,
            historicalFinancial.Data);

        await block.SendAsync(symbol);
    }
}

And usage could be:

var symbols = _service.GetSymbolsAsync();
while (await symbols.OutputAvailableAsync())
{
    Symbol symbol;
    while (symbols.TryReceive(out symbol))
        SymbolsObservableCollection.Add(symbol);
}

Or:

var symbols = _service.GetSymbolsAsync();
var addToCollectionBlock = new ActionBlock<Symbol>(
   symbol => SymbolsObservableCollection.Add(symbol));
symbols.LinkTo(
   addToCollectionBlock, new DataflowLinkOptions { PropagateCompletion = true });
await symbols.Completion;
  • thanks for your answer. I've never took the time to go deeper into TPL Dataflow and RX which I've only heard by name. I'm totally lost when I read the example of code you provided using TPL Dataflow. Can you recommend me a website or any book to get up to speed with TPL Dataflow ? I've done some research on it, and this framework has been out since only 1 year, I'm afraid I will not find a lot of documentation when I'll be stuck to do something with it. Do you know why it's not included in the .NET Framework ? – John Aug 18 '13 at 11:49
  • @Gui It's not included directly in the framework, so that it can be updated more often than it. – svick Aug 18 '13 at 12:10
  • I think you meant GetSymbolsAsyncCore(block).ContinueWith(...) instead of GetSymbolsAsyncCore().ContinueWith(...). Another nitpick is probably not use Async suffix for methods that are not async themselves but returns a data structure that continues to change asynchronously. Using Async suffix gives an impression that await keyword is applicable to that method. – Shital Shah Oct 28 '14 at 22:53
0

I believe you are not able to have an async method be an iterator method as well. This is a limitation of .NET. Have a look at using Task Parallel Library Dataflow, it can be used to process data as it becomes available. And also Reactive Extensions.

0

Why not do something like this:

public async IEnumerable<Task<Symbol>> GetSymbolsAsync()
{
    var historicalFinancialTask = new List<Task<HistoricalFinancialResult>>();

    foreach (var symbol in await _listSymbols)
    {
        historicalFinancialTask.Add(GetFinancialsQueryAsync(symbol));
    }

    while (historicalFinancialTask.Count > 0)
    {
        var historicalFinancial = await Task.WhenAny(historicalFinancialTask);
        historicalFinancialTask.Remove(historicalFinancial);

        yield return new Symbol(historicalFinancial.Result.Symbol.Identifier, historicalFinancial.Result.Symbol.HistoricalQuotes, historicalFinancial.Result.Data); 
    }
}
  • This works, but does have some problems. It dispatches the async work all up front, irrespective of whether anyone ever enumerates the collection, and it dispatches the async work all at the same time (which may be unsuitable depending on the source of the data). With an RX based approach the first problem goes away, and the second is a matter of choice. – piers7 May 15 '15 at 5:11
  • Does that work? Looks to me like GetSymbolsAsync has to return a Task – Vidar May 30 '17 at 15:25

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