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I noticed that if I use a code from a static class, it´s slower than if I run it directly where I want it.

For example:

static class FastMethods
{
    public static byte[] GetBytes(int index, long value)
    {
        byte[] target = new byte[sizeof(Int32)];
        target[index++] = (byte)value;
        target[index++] = (byte)(value >> 8);
        target[index++] = (byte)(value >> 16);
        target[index] = (byte)(value >> 24);
        return target;
    }
}

There is the code I want to use in a separate class, so I can have it more organized. Now this is slower than if I do this:

int index = 0;
long value = ms.Length;
byte[] target = new byte[sizeof(Int32)];
target[index++] = (byte)value;
target[index++] = (byte)(value >> 8);
target[index++] = (byte)(value >> 16);
target[index] = (byte)(value >> 24);

Both do the exact same thing, using the same numbers. If I use the static class, I will just write something like:

var target = FastMethods.GetBytes(0,ms.Length);

So, if I am not completely lost, it should be doing the same thing at least.

And now, when I say slower, I don´t mean a lot, I am talking about ticks. From 1-3 ticks to 3-4.

It normally is at 1-2, and Static will be at around 3, not reaching 1 from my short tests at least.

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Are you testing optimized code? If not, all data obtained are meaningless. –  Cody Gray Aug 17 '13 at 6:09
    
Optimized code? you mean the checkbox, if so, yes it´s checked. And by data, i guess you mean the results? –  Zerowalker Aug 17 '13 at 6:14
    
Yes, compiling as a Release build and either running without the debugger attached or ensuring that the "Disable JIT optimizations" checkbox in the debug options is unchecked. –  Cody Gray Aug 17 '13 at 6:17
    
I think we are talking about 2 different checkboxes. I meant the one in Build "Optimize Code" don´t see anything in debug. –  Zerowalker Aug 17 '13 at 6:19
    
You must run it as Debug->Start without Debugging (CTRL+F5) –  xanatos Aug 17 '13 at 6:20

2 Answers 2

Method calls always have a slight overhead when compared to inline code as there are context changes that are made when a method is called. More IL instructions are generated (pushing arguments, call instruction) than with inline code but the performance loss is very negligible.

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I see. Does this matter in Release Mode as well? And does it matter with Static inside the same class as well? –  Zerowalker Aug 17 '13 at 6:10
    
Unless of course the code is inlined. That's controlled by the JIT compiler, done only when optimizations are enabled. It's also dependent on a variety of heuristics, the most important one here being whether the size of the code is <= 32 bytes of IL. I'm not sure if that's the case here or not, you can't tell just by looking at it. But the heuristics were chosen to balance the overhead of the call with the amount of work done by the callee. –  Cody Gray Aug 17 '13 at 6:13
    
When the debugger isn't attached it isn't possible to tell whether or not the code is inlined, but if the code is more readable when put in a method and is re-used then it's a better decision to put it in a method. –  Ichiru Aug 17 '13 at 6:14
    
Heard this "Inlined" many times, but i don´t get what it means. And so no matter the method, separate class or not. it will slow thing down, and it´s faster to have all the code where it should be. But the cost is less organized code? –  Zerowalker Aug 17 '13 at 6:16
    
Inlined means when the code is generated within the same method. And it is possible that it may slow down by half a millisecond or so, but it isn't a given since the code may be inlined by the JIT or not when the debugger isn't attached –  Ichiru Aug 17 '13 at 6:18

So, if i am not completely lost, it should be doing the same thing at least.

It is doing the same thing as far as fetching of values is concerned, but behind the scenes a lot more is going on. As calling the method has it's own overhead.

But it is never a lot and it is a very small compromise that you have to make for well organised code.

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