7

I converted some c# code to vb.net and the converter.telerik.com turned this:

i--;

into this:

System.Math.Max(System.Threading.Interlocked.Decrement(i), i + 1)

Whats up with all the fancy-ness?

  • It does this on local variables and doesn't use the return value of Math.Max(). That's one crummy converter. – Hans Passant Dec 1 '09 at 22:09
10

Michał Piaskowski's comment triggered the following explanation:

The semantics of i-- in C# are to return the current value of i (i.e., the value before the decrement occurs) and then decrement i by one.

So, we need to convert that to VB. We can not use i -= 1 because this does not return the current value of i before the decrement. So, we need an operation that will decrement i but return the value of i before the decrement, something like:

Function DoPostDecrement(ByRef i As Integer) As Integer
    i -= 1
    Return i + 1
End Function

But this suggests using the following to avoid having to write a method to perform the above:

System.Math.Max(
    someValueThatIsEqualToiMinusOne,
    someValueThatIsEqualtoiBeforeTheDecrement
)

But VB.NET won't let you use i -= 1 or i = i - 1 in place of someValueThatIsEqualToiMinusOne. However, System.Threading.Interlocked.Decrement(i) is legit and equal to the value of i - 1. Once you do that, because parameters are evaluated left to right, someValueThatIsEqualtoiBeforeTheDecrement should be i + 1 (at that point the decrement has been performed to i + 1 is the pre-decrement value.

Note that the above method DoPostDecrement and the System.Math.Max, System.Threading.Interlocked.Decrement construct could have different semantics in a multithreaded context.

  • 1
    i = i - 1; is not the same as i--; it is --i; – Michał Piaskowski Dec 1 '09 at 20:50
  • Well, that effectively explains it then. See my edit. – jason Dec 1 '09 at 20:57
  • 1
    @Downvoter: Explain yourself. – jason Dec 1 '09 at 21:26
2

The Interlocked operation is atomic; in multithreaded contexts you can safely use it without holding a lock, if you're careful.

  • 2
    True but I don't think that's why it's been used. It's just been used as a convenient way to convert the operator in VB.Net. The C# --- operator isn't atomic: and I don't think the translated code fragment is atomic either (what if another thread modifies i in between Decrement and evaluation of i+1)? – MarkJ Dec 2 '09 at 9:51
0

The only reason I can see is from

Interlocked.Decrement Method

Decrements a specified variable and stores the result, as an atomic operation.

0

It depends - is "i" a shared variable? Is it in a thread-safe environment?

If "i" is an integer, then i-- does essentially the following (ignoring the details):

  1. subtracts one from i
  2. assigns that value back to i

As you can see, there are > 1 steps. If "i" is in a non-thread-safe location (static variable shared across threads, etc), then the thread could potentially stop in the middle of those two steps, another thread could run both steps, and then you'd have a problem with invalid data.

The Interlocked class essentially combines the two steps above into a single step, providing an atomic operation. Now you don't have to worry about threads, since it's a single operation and can't be interrupted by another thread.

  • 1
    In another comment: "I would argue that it should not as it could change the semantics in a multithreaded context." In a single-threaded context, the behaviour is unchanged. In a multi-threaded context, the behaviour is now guaranteed to do something predictable, which it would not be before. So either way, this is a "good change". – jvenema Dec 1 '09 at 20:54
  • True but I don't think that's why Increment's been used. It's just been used as a convenient way to convert the operator in VB.Net. The C# -- operator isn't atomic: and I don't think the translated code fragment is atomic either - what if another thread modifies i in between Decrement and evaluation of i+1 ? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa446528.aspx – MarkJ Dec 2 '09 at 9:54
  • Good point Mark...somehow I glazed over the fact the the i+1 is in there :) I'm sure you're right, its just a conversion thing. – jvenema Dec 2 '09 at 13:55
0

To answer your question, looks like this converter.telerik.com thing is being overly-conservative about threading problems. WAAAY overly-conservative. I would revert the code to i-- if the same instance of i isn't being mutated from multiple threads concurrently.

  • Can the down-voter enlighten me with a comment? – G-Wiz Dec 1 '09 at 21:11
  • I think Decrement's just been used as a convenient way to convert the -- operator into VB.Net. There isn't a -- operator in VB.Net so you can't "revert the code" to i-- unless you revert it to C# – MarkJ Dec 2 '09 at 9:55
  • Ahh I see. Thank for clarifying that! – G-Wiz Dec 2 '09 at 17:47

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