168

Is this

struct Example { 
    string a, b; 

    Example(Example&& mE) : a{move(mE.a)}, b{move(mE.b)} { }
    Example& operator=(Example&& mE) { a = move(mE.a); b = move(mE.b); return *this; } 
}

equivalent to this

struct Example { 
    string a, b;

    Example(Example&& mE)            = default;
    Example& operator=(Example&& mE) = default;
}

?

4
  • This might be a duplication of stackoverflow.com/questions/4819936/…
    – user2249683
    Commented Aug 17, 2013 at 15:55
  • 10
    @DieterLücking: It's clearly not, though it's on a similar topic and some answers may cover similar ground. However, we shall not close every single question about move semantics as duplicates of each other. Commented Aug 18, 2013 at 1:45
  • 1
    Note, I added my answer to this question because at the time I was looking for a quote from the standard that proved they were equivalent and the accepted answer does not do that. So, I just found the quote and added my answer. Commented Feb 2, 2018 at 16:35
  • 1
    I also want to mention, that in your Example the default constructor is not declared and the destructor is defaulted - See Howard Hinnant - compiler implicit declares
    – thomas.st
    Commented Feb 2, 2020 at 13:03

4 Answers 4

80

Yes both are the same.

But

struct Example { 
    string a, b; 

    Example(Example&& mE)            = default;
    Example& operator=(Example&& mE) = default;
}

This version will permits you to skip the body definition.

However, you have to follow some rules when you declare explicitly-defaulted-functions :

8.4.2 Explicitly-defaulted functions [dcl.fct.def.default]

A function definition of the form:

  attribute-specifier-seqopt decl-specifier-seqopt declarator virt-specifier-seqopt = default ;

is called an explicitly-defaulted definition. A function that is explicitly defaulted shall

  • be a special member function,

  • have the same declared function type (except for possibly differing ref-qualifiers and except that in the case of a copy constructor or copy assignment operator, the parameter type may be “reference to non-const T”, where T is the name of the member function’s class) as if it had been implicitly declared,

  • not have default arguments.

5
  • 2
    What document are you quoting 8.4.2 from? Neither the C++11 standard or N3690 contain the text ", and not have an exception-specification" in 8.4.2/1. They do both say in 8.4.2/2: "An explicitly-defaulted function may be declared constexpr only if it would have been implicitly declared as constexpr, and may have an explicit exception-specification only if it is compatible (15.4) with the exception-specification on the implicit declaration."
    – Casey
    Commented Aug 17, 2013 at 22:45
  • 2
    @Casey Good catch ! I was quoting the N3242... I mixed up my docs... I updated my post to quote the N3690 ! Thank you for pointing this out ! Commented Aug 17, 2013 at 22:55
  • 2
    If I set a move constructor and assignment operator to = default, will I be able to swap with the object? Don't I need to declare the constructor as noexcept? I tried putting both noexcept and =default for both, but this would not compile.
    – VF1
    Commented Aug 23, 2013 at 19:21
  • Declaring copy constructor or assignment or destructor prevents default move constructor generation. If we define any of these functions,we have to define move constructor. But how about the case copy constructor is defined but move constructor is created by default keyword.Does it work as expected? Commented Dec 23, 2018 at 23:31
  • Are they the same even if Example inherits some class?
    – Voyager
    Commented Nov 16, 2022 at 17:39
47

Is a =default move constructor equivalent to a member-wise move constructor?

Yes. Update: Well, not always. Look at this example:

#include <iostream>

struct nonmovable
{
    nonmovable() = default;

    nonmovable(const nonmovable  &) = default;
    nonmovable(      nonmovable &&) = delete;
};

struct movable
{
    movable() = default;

    movable(const movable  &) { std::cerr << "copy" << std::endl; }
    movable(      movable &&) { std::cerr << "move" << std::endl; }
};

struct has_nonmovable
{
    movable    a;
    nonmovable b;

    has_nonmovable() = default;

    has_nonmovable(const has_nonmovable  &) = default;
    has_nonmovable(      has_nonmovable &&) = default;
};

int main()
{
    has_nonmovable c;
    has_nonmovable d(std::move(c)); // prints copy
}

It prints:

copy

http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/62c0a0aaec15b0eb

You declared defaulted move constructor, but copying happens instead of moving. Why? Because if a class has even a single non-movable member then the explicitly defaulted move constructor is implicitly deleted (such a pun). So when you run has_nonmovable d = std::move(c), the copy constructor is actually called, because the move constructor of has_nonmovable is deleted (implicitly), it just doesn't exists (even though you explicitly declared the move constructor by expression has_nonmovable(has_nonmovable &&) = default).

But if the move constructor of non_movable was not declared at all, the move constructor would be used for movable (and for every member that has the move constructor) and the copy constructor would be used for nonmovable (and for every member that does not define the move constructor). See the example:

#include <iostream>

struct nonmovable
{
    nonmovable() = default;

    nonmovable(const nonmovable  &) { std::cerr << "nonmovable::copy" << std::endl; }
    //nonmovable(      nonmovable &&) = delete;
};

struct movable
{
    movable() = default;

    movable(const movable  &) { std::cerr << "movable::copy" << std::endl; }
    movable(      movable &&) { std::cerr << "movable::move" << std::endl; }
};

struct has_nonmovable
{
    movable    a;
    nonmovable b;

    has_nonmovable() = default;

    has_nonmovable(const has_nonmovable  &) = default;
    has_nonmovable(      has_nonmovable &&) = default;
};

int main()
{
    has_nonmovable c;
    has_nonmovable d(std::move(c));
}

It prints:

movable::move
nonmovable::copy

http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/420cc6c80ddac407

Update: But if you comment out the line has_nonmovable(has_nonmovable &&) = default;, then copy will be used for both members: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/171fd0ce335327cd - prints:

movable::copy
nonmovable::copy

So probably putting =default everywhere still makes sense. It doesn't mean that your move expressions will always move, but it makes chances of this higher.

One more update: But if comment out the line has_nonmovable(const has_nonmovable &) = default; either, then the result will be:

movable::move
nonmovable::copy

So if you want to know what happens in your program, just do everything by yourself :sigh:

12
  • The explicitly defaulted move constructor is deleted in your first example, because that's what an implicit move constructor would be. It is overload resolution that disambiguates between the copy and move when presented with an rvalue
    – Caleth
    Commented Oct 3, 2018 at 9:18
  • 4
    That's the difference between deleted implicitly-declared and explicitly deleted. When you explicitly delete a special member, it remains in the overload set, and the program is ill-formed if it would be selected. When it is implicitly deleted, it is removed from the overload set. See Deleted implicitly-declared move constructor
    – Caleth
    Commented Oct 3, 2018 at 11:18
  • 1
    If and only if the member wise move would be ill-formed, so I don't count it as different
    – Caleth
    Commented Oct 3, 2018 at 11:31
  • 8
    @Caleth, But I do. For me, it would be better if a compiler just gave me the message: cannot declare explicitly defaulted move constructor because it would be ill-formed. Without this I just think that my move-expression moves when it is actually not a move expression at all because the move constructor was implicitly deleted by compiler. Explicit expression makes implicit things. This confuses very much.
    – anton_rh
    Commented Oct 3, 2018 at 11:45
  • 2
    Why oh why can't the compiler errors be more helpful. The language is becoming unusable by anyone outside the standards committee. The initialization rules alone are far too complex to keep in your head randomcat.org/cpp_initialization/initialization.png. The compiler should be surfacing these details in a helpful manner.
    – sleep
    Commented Sep 29, 2023 at 1:20
34

Yes, a defaulted move constructor will perform a member-wise move of its base and members, so:

Example(Example&& mE) : a{move(mE.a)}, b{move(mE.b)} { }

is equivalent to:

Example(Example&& mE)                 = default;

we can see this by going to the draft C++11 standard section 12.8 Copying and moving class objects paragraph 13 which says (emphasis mine going forward):

A copy/move constructor that is defaulted and not defined as deleted is implicitly defined if it is odrused (3.2) or when it is explicitly defaulted after its first declaration. [ Note: The copy/move constructor is implicitly defined even if the implementation elided its odr-use (3.2, 12.2). —end note ][...]

and paragraph 15 which says:

The implicitly-defined copy/move constructor for a non-union class X performs a memberwise copy/move of its bases and members. [ Note: brace-or-equal-initializers of non-static data members are ignored. See also the example in 12.6.2. —end note ] The order of initialization is the same as the order of initialization of bases and members in a user-defined constructor (see 12.6.2). Let x be either the parameter of the constructor or, for the move constructor, an xvalue referring to the parameter. Each base or non-static data member is copied/moved in the manner appropriate to its type:

  • if the member is an array, each element is direct-initialized with the corresponding subobject of x;
  • if a member m has rvalue reference type T&&, it is direct-initialized with static_cast(x.m);
  • otherwise, the base or member is direct-initialized with the corresponding base or member of x.

Virtual base class subobjects shall be initialized only once by the implicitly-defined copy/move constructor (see 12.6.2).

0
-3

apart very pathological cases ... YES.

To be more precise, you have also to considered eventual bases Example may have, with exact same rules. First the bases -in declaration order- then the members, always in declaration order.

1
  • 2
    But code cannot change the order of subobject construction. The language ignores the order of the constructor's member-initializer list and always constructs (and destructs) class subobjects in a consistent order. So changing that will not cause a constructor to not be equivalent.
    – aschepler
    Commented Oct 3, 2018 at 12:34

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