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This question already has an answer here:

I am an intermediate Java programmer and want to shift to C#. I am totally new to this Microsoft language. In books, they are using both terms Visual C# and C#. Can anyone please tell the real difference between the terms?

marked as duplicate by Shadow Wizard, Sumurai8, Mat, Ajay S, Donal Fellows Apr 27 '14 at 14:58

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    I see some evidence for "Visual C#" as Microsoft's implementation of the C# language. Not seen much support for that in the field, though, where usage is pretty much interchangeable. – Michael Petrotta Aug 18 '13 at 3:34
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Visual C# is an implementation of the C# language by Microsoft.

Visual C# is just C#. You can build any kind of .NET application using C# and Visual Studio makes it easier test and debug your application.
for example using Visual Studio brings you lots of capabilities :

  1. Code Editor

  2. Debugger

  3. Designer

  4. Windows Forms Designer

  5. WPF Designer

    ,...

for more information about Visual Studio read this page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Visual_Studio

Update: Visual C# is the marketing name that Microsoft uses for C#, So nobody calls it Visual C#.

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    "Visual C# is just a GUI designed by Microsoft" That's Visual Studio. – BoltClock Aug 18 '13 at 3:49
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C# would refer to the language itself, which can be compiled without the Visual Studio environment using the .NET SDK & the supplied csc.exe (c# compiler - like javac) or the Mono environment.

Visual C# likely refers to the C# language AND the Visual Studio IDE / Toolchain (SQL/Reports etc.).

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There is no real difference between C# and Visual C#. The terms are often used interchangeably.

Visual C# kind of implies using the Visual Studio for C# development. But there is only C#.

See here for learning resources.

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