0

What is the best/right way, in perl, of keeping the information from the previous and/or following line. For example, with this code:

while (<IN>) {
   print;
}

how can it be changed to not print the line only if the previous or the next line in the file match foo, but printing otherwise?

Could you give code examples. Thanks.

2
  • Is this homework? What have you tried? Aug 18, 2013 at 10:41
  • No, this was just a simplification of the problem and that the answers posted here could be of general interest for who works with perl but has limited knowledge, like me... I have two tabular files (say 4 columns) that I want to intersect and remove the lines from file A that are present in file B (I have already code for this using %seen with your help), but only if the previous line and next line of file A do not have e.g. foo in the 3rd column. Thanks
    – PedroA
    Aug 18, 2013 at 13:00

4 Answers 4

2

Updated: Simplified exposition.

Basically, you need to keep track of two extra lines if you want to print the current lines based on information contained in two other lines. Here is a simple script with everything hard-coded:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $prev = undef;
my $candidate = scalar <DATA>;

while (defined $candidate) {
    my $next = <DATA>;
    unless (
        (defined($prev) && ($prev =~ /foo/)) ||
        (defined($next) && ($next =~ /foo/))
    ) {
        print $candidate;
    }
    ($prev, $candidate) = ($candidate, $next);
}

__DATA__
1
2
foo
3
4
5
foo
6
foo
7
8
9
foo

We can generalize this to a function that takes a filehandle and a test (as a subroutine reference):

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;

print_mid_if(\*DATA, sub{ return !(
    (defined($_[0]) && ($_[0] =~ /foo/)) ||
    (defined($_[1]) && ($_[1] =~ /foo/))
)} );

sub print_mid_if {
    my $fh = shift;
    my $test = shift;

    my $prev = undef;
    my $candidate = scalar <$fh>;

    while (defined $candidate) {
        my $next = <$fh>;
        print $candidate if $test->($prev, $next);
        ($prev, $candidate) = ($candidate, $next);
    }
}

__DATA__
1
2
foo
3
4
5
foo
6
foo
7
8
9
foo
5
  • Thanks for the help. Although I do not understand all the statements and variables I will try to work this out. If I could I would upvote you.
    – PedroA
    Aug 18, 2013 at 20:37
  • Sorry for the lack of knowledge, but tried to read the data from a file into the print_mid_if subroutine has array reference however I was not able to set the test because $_[0] was undefined...
    – PedroA
    Aug 18, 2013 at 23:03
  • Accepted answer for background and explanation. The only problem I am having is on to pass the input stream and the test to print_mid_if subroutine without going through the first run() subroutine. But I will try to manage that.
    – PedroA
    Aug 20, 2013 at 22:11
  • Just FYI, I went a little crazy with this idea on my blog. It might be informative or confusing. Aug 20, 2013 at 22:27
  • I am not sure what kind of problem you are having invoking the subroutine. As I asked before, please incorporate such information into your post so we can help. Aug 20, 2013 at 22:31
2

You could read your line into an array, and then if you get something that signals you in some way, pop out the last few elements of the array. Once you've finished reading everything in, you could print it:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);
use autodie;  #Won't catch attempt to read from an empty file

use constant    FILE_NAME => "some_name.txt"
   or die qq(Cannot open ) . FILE_NAME . qq(for reading: $!\n);
open my $fh, "<", FILE_NAME;

my @output;
LINE:
while ( my $line = <DATA> ) {
    chomp $line;
    if ( $line eq "foo" ) {
        pop @output;  #The line before foo
        <DATA>;        #The line after foo
        next LINE;    #Skip line foo. Don't push it into the array
    }
    push @output, $line;
}

From there, you can print out the array with the values you don't want printed already taken care of.

for my $line ( @output ) {
   say $line;
}

The only problem is that this takes memory. If your file is extremely large, you could run out of memory.

One way to get around this is to use a buffer. You store your values in an array, and shift out the last value when you push another in the array. If the value read in is foo, you can reset the array. In this case, the buffer will contain at most one line:

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;
use feature qw(say);

my @buffer;
LINE:
while ( my $line = <DATA> ) {
    chomp $line;
    if ( $line eq "foo" ) {
        @buffer = ();    #Empty buffer of previous line
        <DATA>;           #Get rid of the next line
        next LINE;       #Foo doesn't get pushed into the buffer
    }
    push @buffer, $line;
    if ( @buffer > 1 ) {    #Buffer is "full"
        say shift @buffer; #Print out previous line
    }
}
#
# Empty out buffer
#
for my $line ( @buffer ) {
    say $line;
}
__DATA__
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
1
2
foo
3
4
5
foo
6
7
8
9
foo

Note that it is very possible that I might attempt to read from an empty file when I skip the next line. This is okay. The <$fh> will return either an empty string or undef, but I can ignore that. I'll catch the error when I go back to the top of my loop.

5
  • If I understand correctly, the question is to filter out lines either preceded or followed by a line containing foo. I don't think either of your solutions does that. Aug 19, 2013 at 10:10
  • My solutions are both talking about the two previous lines of code. Not printing the next line is fairly straight forward. The previous line is harder since you don't know until you get the line. However, I'll adjust my answers.
    – David W.
    Aug 19, 2013 at 13:51
  • @SinanÜnür The answer now handles the line before and after.
    – David W.
    Aug 19, 2013 at 14:08
  • Sorry but this program does not do what I want. Is outputting the following: Useless use of unshift with no values at ./DavidW_best.pl line 24. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 1 2 foo 3 4 5 foo 6 7 8 9 foo
    – PedroA
    Aug 20, 2013 at 22:08
  • @PedroA - It's suppose to be shift and not unshift. Do you want to print the word foo? Or, is that to be skipped. I've fixed the program.
    – David W.
    Aug 21, 2013 at 0:32
2

I didn't see that you had any specific criteria for "best", so I'll give you a solution that may be "best" along a different axis than those presented so far. You could use Tie::File and treat the entire file as an array, then iterate the array using an index. The previous and next lines are just $index-1 and $index+1 respectively. You just have to worry a little about your indices going beyond the bounds of your array. Here's an example:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;          # just for "say"
use Tie::File;

tie my @array, 'Tie::File', "filename" or die;

for my $i (0..$#array) {
    if ($i > 0 && $i < $#array) {   # ensure $i-1 and $i+1 make sense
        next if $array[$i-1] =~ /BEFORE/ &&
                $array[$i+1] =~ /AFTER/;
    }
    say $array[$i];
}

If it's more convenient, you can specify a filehandle instead of a filename and Tie::File also has some parameters to control memory usage or change what it means to be a "line" if you want that. Check the docs for more info.

Anyway, that's another way to do what you want that might be conceptually simpler if you are familiar with arrays and like to think in terms of arrays.

1

I would read the file into an array, with each line being an array element, then you can do the comparisons. The only real design consideration is the size of the file being read into memory.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.