I am using autofixture in my unit tests and it is great the way that it works as an automocker.

However I have a problem when injecting a lazy loaded object into my class. For example:

public class MyClass : IMyClass
{
    private Lazy<IMyInjectedClass> _myInjectedClassLazy;
    private IMyInjectedClass _myInjectedClass {
        get { return _myInjectedClassLazy.Value; }
    }

    public MyClass(Lazy<IMyInjectedClass> injectedClass)
    {
        _myInjectedClassLazy = _myInjectedClass;
    }

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        _myInjectedClass.DoSomething();
    }
}

Then when I try to run a test where I use autofixture to generate the class as so:

public class MyTests
{
    [Test]
    public void ShouldDoSomething()
    {
        var fixture = new Fixture().Customize(new AutoMoqCustomization());
        fixture.Behaviors.Remove(new ThrowingRecursionBehavior());
        fixture.Behaviors.Add(new OmitOnRecursionBehavior());

        var mockMyClass = fixture.Freeze<Mock<IMyClass>>();

        var sut = fixture.Create<MyClass>();

        sut.DoSomething();
    }
}

But this code throws the following error:

System.MissingMemberException : The lazily-initialized type does not have a public, parameterless constructor.

Is there a way that I can avoid this error and inject lazy objects when using autofixture?

  • 1
    Why inject Lazy<IMyInjectedClass>? Injecting IMyInjectedClass would be simpler and better. – Mark Seemann Aug 19 '13 at 8:13
  • The reason is to make the object graph smaller, before I was injecting lazy objects the dependency injection was taking a long time to initialise because of the big object graph that had to be created. When they are lazy the initial startup is faster because the graph is much smaller as each part of the graph only has to be constructed when it is needed. – Tim Pickin Aug 19 '13 at 11:59
  • 3
    That's a leaky abstraction, and there's a better solution for that: blog.ploeh.dk/2011/03/04/Composeobjectgraphswithconfidence – Mark Seemann Aug 19 '13 at 12:09

FWIW, although I disagree with the motivation for doing this, you can tell AutoFixture how to create an instance of Lazy<IMyInjectedClass>:

var fixture = new Fixture().Customize(new AutoMoqCustomization());
fixture.Behaviors.Remove(new ThrowingRecursionBehavior());
fixture.Behaviors.Add(new OmitOnRecursionBehavior());
fixture.Register(                                                   // Add this 
    (IMyInjectedClass x) => new Lazy<IMyInjectedClass>(() => x));   // to pass

var mockMyClass = fixture.Freeze<Mock<IMyClass>>();

var sut = fixture.Create<MyClass>();

sut.DoSomething();

If you need to do this repeatedly, you should consider packaging this in a Customization.

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