22

I have a div inside a div.

The div inside is wider than its parent so the normal procedure

margin-left: auto;
margin-right: auto;

produces an inner div where the left edge of the child aligns with the left edge of the parent.

When people answers this question, they uses to go for the negative left margin approach. Is there a cleaner solution?

5
  • what do you mean by cleaner solution .. :D .. ?
    – Richa
    Commented Aug 19, 2013 at 8:48
  • 1
    That a negative margin is conceptually a non existing thing in the real world. However, most of the badness to this solutions comes from the required calculation that I need to do every time I change a measure. Commented Aug 19, 2013 at 8:57
  • But i don't think we can achieve this without using negative margin.. and to avoid different classes for different calculations we can use jquery.
    – Richa
    Commented Aug 19, 2013 at 9:08
  • 1
    Using negative values for margin is a valid approach. and there is no need of doing calculations every time when you change something if you use percentages. Check out this fiddle. (works if you know the widths of the containers)
    – Mr_Green
    Commented Aug 19, 2013 at 9:19
  • When you mention knowing widths of containers, I have to add extra badness points to negative margins. Commented Aug 19, 2013 at 9:38

5 Answers 5

21

You can use flexbox:

.outer {
  display: flex; /* Magic begins */
  justify-content: center; /* Center contents */
  width: 400px;
  height: 400px;
  background: beige;
  margin: 0 auto;
}
.inner {
  flex-shrink: 0; /* Don't shrink it even if it's too wide */
  width: 600px;
  height: 200px;
  background: pink;
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="inner"></div>
</div>

3
  • This answer is really nice for a responsive layout with fluid measures. Commented Oct 27, 2017 at 18:59
  • 1
    In 2017+, this seems to be the best approach to me.
    – rinogo
    Commented Nov 10, 2017 at 17:38
  • 1
    @Oriol I like this solution but unfortunately it doesn't work in IE. Is there a fix for IE? Commented Jun 20, 2018 at 7:15
18

I worked out an easy way for absolute elements using a transform.

left: 50%;
transform: translateX(-50%);

Will center it if wider than parent.

1
  • 2
    Best answer. Thanks! Commented Sep 13, 2019 at 11:19
5

How about using position: absolute; with left:0;right:0; and margin: auto;

Also, you'll need to place position: relative; on a parent element which has greater width than the outer element. (In the fiddle below it's relative to the body by default)

FIDDLE

<div class="outer">
    <div class="inner"></div>
</div>

css

.outer
{
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
    background: beige;
    margin: 0 auto;

}
.inner
{
    width: 600px;
    height: 200px;
    background: pink;
    position: absolute;
    left:0;right:0;
    margin: auto;
}
6
  • 1
    it is based on the solution mentioned here: coding.smashingmagazine.com/2013/08/09/…
    – user753676
    Commented Aug 19, 2013 at 9:25
  • 2
    This could be the best answer. but no answer is going to be cleaner than a negative margin.
    – iConnor
    Commented Aug 19, 2013 at 9:29
  • If I set position: relative on .outer, the child will be left align with it, why? Commented Aug 19, 2013 at 9:34
  • 1
    @AndersLindén if you set position: relative on .outer, then it will do just that - ie positioning on .inner will start from the point where .outer starts (aligning .inner to the lhs of outer) So like I said in the answer - you'll need to place position: relative; on a parent element which has greater width - which relative to it you want to center .inner
    – Danield
    Commented Aug 19, 2013 at 9:48
  • 3
    does not work unless you force the outer element to be centered itself, and also, this is a major fake solution since your outer element isn't relatively positioned, which must be set 99% of the cases...so I don't see any way to use this, at all
    – vsync
    Commented Apr 16, 2014 at 10:06
0

If the inner is an image I prefer this one
background: url("../img/pic.jpg") no-repeat center center fixed; -moz-background-size: cover; -webkit-background-size: cover; -o-background-size: cover; background-size: cover;

0

See this website: http://www.greywyvern.com/?post=323

Works even if the page is narrower than the child div.

div#context {
  border:1px solid blue;
  width:400px;
  margin:0px auto;
}
div#context div {
  position:relative;
  right:50%;
  text-align:center;
}
div#context div p {
  border:1px solid green;
  width:450px;
  height:50px;
  display:inline-block;
  margin-right:-100%;
}
<div id="context">
  Page centering context
  <div>
<p>
  This is the child element<br />
  which should be centered
</p>
  </div>
</div>

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