86

I have a problem in my custom deserializer in Jackson. I want to access the default serializer to populate the object I am deserializing into. After the population I will do some custom things but first I want to deserialize the object with the default Jackson behavior.

This is the code that I have at the moment.

public class UserEventDeserializer extends StdDeserializer<User> {

  private static final long serialVersionUID = 7923585097068641765L;

  public UserEventDeserializer() {
    super(User.class);
  }

  @Override
  @Transactional
  public User deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext ctxt)
      throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {

    ObjectCodec oc = jp.getCodec();
    JsonNode node = oc.readTree(jp);
    User deserializedUser = null;
    deserializedUser = super.deserialize(jp, ctxt, new User()); 
    // The previous line generates an exception java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException
    // Because there is no implementation of the deserializer.
    // I want a way to access the default spring deserializer for my User class.
    // How can I do that?

    //Special logic

    return deserializedUser;
  }

}

What I need is a way to initialize the default deserializer so that I can pre-populate my POJO before I start my special logic.

When calling deserialize from within the custom deserializer It seems the method is called from the current context no matter how I construct the serializer class. Because of the annotation in my POJO. This causes a Stack Overflow exception for obvious reasons.

I have tried initializing a BeanDeserializer but the process is extremely complex and I haven't managed to find the right way to do it. I have also tried overloading the AnnotationIntrospector to no avail, thinking that it might help me ignore the annotation in the DeserializerContext. Finally it seams I might have had some success using JsonDeserializerBuilders although this required me to do some magic stuff to get hold of the application context from Spring. I would appreciate any thing that could lead me to a cleaner solution for example how Can I construct a deserialization context without reading the JsonDeserializer annotation.

  • 1
    No. Those approaches will not help: the problem is that you will need a fully constructed default deserializer; and this requires that one gets built, and then your deserializer gets access to it. DeserializationContext is not something you should either create or change; it will be provided by ObjectMapper. AnnotationIntrospector, likewise, won't be of help in getting access. – StaxMan Aug 21 '13 at 21:16
  • How did you end up doing it in the end? – khituras Oct 29 '14 at 7:32
  • Good question. I'm not sure but I am certain the answer below helped me. I am currently not in the possession of the code that we wrote if you do find a solution please post it here for others. – Pablo Jomer Oct 29 '14 at 9:44

10 Answers 10

84
+200

As StaxMan already suggested you can do this by writing a BeanDeserializerModifier and registering it via SimpleModule. The following example should work:

public class UserEventDeserializer extends StdDeserializer<User> implements ResolvableDeserializer
{
  private static final long serialVersionUID = 7923585097068641765L;

  private final JsonDeserializer<?> defaultDeserializer;

  public UserEventDeserializer(JsonDeserializer<?> defaultDeserializer)
  {
    super(User.class);
    this.defaultDeserializer = defaultDeserializer;
  }

  @Override public User deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext ctxt)
      throws IOException, JsonProcessingException
  {
    User deserializedUser = (User) defaultDeserializer.deserialize(jp, ctxt);

    // Special logic

    return deserializedUser;
  }

  // for some reason you have to implement ResolvableDeserializer when modifying BeanDeserializer
  // otherwise deserializing throws JsonMappingException??
  @Override public void resolve(DeserializationContext ctxt) throws JsonMappingException
  {
    ((ResolvableDeserializer) defaultDeserializer).resolve(ctxt);
  }


  public static void main(String[] args) throws JsonParseException, JsonMappingException, IOException
  {
    SimpleModule module = new SimpleModule();
    module.setDeserializerModifier(new BeanDeserializerModifier()
    {
      @Override public JsonDeserializer<?> modifyDeserializer(DeserializationConfig config, BeanDescription beanDesc, JsonDeserializer<?> deserializer)
      {
        if (beanDesc.getBeanClass() == User.class)
          return new UserEventDeserializer(deserializer);
        return deserializer;
      }
    });


    ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    mapper.registerModule(module);
    User user = mapper.readValue(new File("test.json"), User.class);
  }
}
  • Thanks! I already solved this in another way but I will look into your solution when i have more time. – Pablo Jomer Aug 24 '13 at 8:39
  • 5
    Is there a way to do the same but with a JsonSerializer ? I have several serializers but they have code on common so i want to generify it. I try to directly call The serializer but The result isn't unwrapped in the JSON result (each call of serializer create a new object) – herau Oct 17 '14 at 16:19
  • 1
    @herau BeanSerializerModifier, ResolvableSerializer and ContextualSerializer are the matching interfaces to use for serialization. – StaxMan Oct 4 '16 at 18:32
  • Is this applicable for EE edition containers (Wildfly 10)? I get JsonMappingException: (was java.lang.NullPointerException) (through reference chain: java.util.ArrayList[0]) – user1927033 Jun 15 '17 at 1:38
  • The question uses readTree() but the answer does not. What is the advantage of this approach versus the one posted by Derek Cochran? Is there a way to make this work with readTree()? – Gili Nov 1 '18 at 21:51
8

There are couple of ways to do this, but to do it right involves bit more work. Basically you can not use sub-classing, since information default deserializers need is built from class definitions.

So what you can most likely use is to construct a BeanDeserializerModifier, register that via Module interface (use SimpleModule). You need to define/override modifyDeserializer, and for the specific case where you want to add your own logic (where type matches), construct your own deserializer, pass the default deserializer you are given. And then in deserialize() method you can just delegate call, take the result Object.

Alternatively, if you must actually create and populate the object, you can do so and call overloaded version of deserialize() that takes third argument; object to deserialize into.

Another way that might work (but not 100% sure) would be to specify Converter object (@JsonDeserialize(converter=MyConverter.class)). This is a new Jackson 2.2 feature. In your case, Converter would not actually convert type, but simplify modify the object: but I don't know if that would let you do exactly what you want, since the default deserializer would be called first, and only then your Converter.

  • My answer still stands: you need to let Jackson construct the default deserializer to delegate to; and have to find a way to "override" it. BeanDeserializerModifier is the callback handler that allows that. – StaxMan Aug 21 '13 at 21:17
8

The DeserializationContext has a readValue() method you may use. This should work for both the default deserializer and any custom deserializers you have.

Just be sure to call traverse() on the JsonNode level you want to read to retrieve the JsonParser to pass to readValue().

public class FooDeserializer extends StdDeserializer<FooBean> {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    public FooDeserializer() {
        this(null);
    }

    public FooDeserializer(Class<FooBean> t) {
        super(t);
    }

    @Override
    public FooBean deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext ctxt) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
        JsonNode node = jp.getCodec().readTree(jp);
        FooBean foo = new FooBean();
        foo.setBar(ctxt.readValue(node.get("bar").traverse(), BarBean.class));
        return foo;
    }

}
  • DeserialisationContext.readValue() does not exist, that is a method of ObjectMapper – Pedro Borges Jun 13 '18 at 15:24
  • this solution is working well, however you might need to call nextToken() if you deserialize a value class e.g. Date.class – revau.lt Sep 6 '18 at 8:57
6

I found an answer at https://stackoverflow.com/a/51927577/14731 which is much more readable than the accepted answer.

public User deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext ctxt)
    throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
        JsonNode tree = jp.readTree(jp);

        // To call the default deserializer, simply invoke:
        User user = tree.get("user").traverse(jp.getCodec()).readValueAs(User.class);
        return user;
      }

It really doesn't get easier than this.

  • Hi Gili! Thanks for it I'm hoping that people find this answer and have time to validate it. I am no longer in a position to do so there for I can not accept the answer at this time. If I see that people do say this is a possible solution I will of course guide them towards it. It may also be that this is not possible for all versions. Still thanks for sharing. – Pablo Jomer Nov 4 '18 at 21:02
4

If it is possible for you to declare extra User class then you can implement it just using annotations

// your class
@JsonDeserialize(using = UserEventDeserializer.class)
public class User {
...
}

// extra user class
// reset deserializer attribute to default
@JsonDeserialize
public class UserPOJO extends User {
}

public class UserEventDeserializer extends StdDeserializer<User> {

  ...
  @Override
  public User deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext ctxt)
      throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
    // specify UserPOJO.class to invoke default deserializer
    User deserializedUser = jp.ReadValueAs(UserPOJO.class);
    return deserializedUser;

    // or if you need to walk the JSON tree

    ObjectMapper mapper = (ObjectMapper) jp.getCodec();
    JsonNode node = oc.readTree(jp);
    // specify UserPOJO.class to invoke default deserializer
    User deserializedUser = mapper.treeToValue(node, UserPOJO.class);

    return deserializedUser;
  }

}
1

A simpler solution for me was to just add another bean of ObjectMapper and use that to deserialize the object (thanks to https://stackoverflow.com/users/1032167/varren comment) - in my case I was interested to either deserialize to its id (an int) or the whole object https://stackoverflow.com/a/46618193/986160

import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonAutoDetect;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.PropertyAccessor;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonParser;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonProcessingException;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.*;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.deser.std.StdDeserializer;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;

import java.io.IOException;

public class IdWrapperDeserializer<T> extends StdDeserializer<T> {

    private Class<T> clazz;

    public IdWrapperDeserializer(Class<T> clazz) {
        super(clazz);
        this.clazz = clazz;
    }

    @Bean
    public ObjectMapper objectMapper() {
        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        mapper.configure(DeserializationFeature.FAIL_ON_UNKNOWN_PROPERTIES, false);
        mapper.configure(MapperFeature.DEFAULT_VIEW_INCLUSION, true);
        mapper.configure(SerializationFeature.FAIL_ON_EMPTY_BEANS, false);
        mapper.setVisibility(PropertyAccessor.ALL, JsonAutoDetect.Visibility.NONE);
        mapper.setVisibility(PropertyAccessor.FIELD, JsonAutoDetect.Visibility.ANY);
        return mapper;
    }

    @Override
    public T deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext dc) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
        String json = jp.readValueAsTree().toString();
          // do your custom deserialization here using json
          // and decide when to use default deserialization using local objectMapper:
          T obj = objectMapper().readValue(json, clazz);

          return obj;
     }
}

for each entity that needs to be going through custom deserializer we need to configure it in the global ObjectMapper bean of the Spring Boot App in my case (e.g for Category):

@Bean
public ObjectMapper objectMapper() {
    ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
                mapper.configure(DeserializationFeature.FAIL_ON_UNKNOWN_PROPERTIES, false);
            mapper.configure(MapperFeature.DEFAULT_VIEW_INCLUSION, true);
            mapper.configure(SerializationFeature.FAIL_ON_EMPTY_BEANS, false);
            mapper.setVisibility(PropertyAccessor.ALL, JsonAutoDetect.Visibility.NONE);
            mapper.setVisibility(PropertyAccessor.FIELD, JsonAutoDetect.Visibility.ANY);
    SimpleModule testModule = new SimpleModule("MyModule")
            .addDeserializer(Category.class, new IdWrapperDeserializer(Category.class))

    mapper.registerModule(testModule);

    return mapper;
}
0

I was not ok with using BeanSerializerModifier since it forces to declare some behavioral changes in central ObjectMapper rather than in custom deserializer itself and in fact it is parallel solution to annotating entity class with JsonSerialize. If you feel it the similar way, you might appreciate my answer here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/43213463/653539

0

You are bound to fail if you try to create your custom deserializer from scratch.

Instead, you need to get hold of the (fully configured) default deserializer instance through a custom BeanDeserializerModifier, and then pass this instance to your custom deserializer class:

public ObjectMapper getMapperWithCustomDeserializer() {
    ObjectMapper objectMapper = new ObjectMapper();

    SimpleModule module = new SimpleModule();
    module.setDeserializerModifier(new BeanDeserializerModifier() {
        @Override
        public JsonDeserializer<?> modifyDeserializer(DeserializationConfig config,
                    BeanDescription beanDesc, JsonDeserializer<?> defaultDeserializer) 
            if (beanDesc.getBeanClass() == User.class) {
                return new UserEventDeserializer(defaultDeserializer);
            } else {
                return defaultDeserializer;
            }
        }
    });
    objectMapper.registerModule(module);

    return objectMapper;
}

Note: This module registration replaces the @JsonDeserialize annotation, i.e. the User class or User fields should no longer be annotated with this annotation.

The custom deserializer should then be based on a DelegatingDeserializer so that all methods delegate, unless you provide an explicit implementation:

public class UserEventDeserializer extends DelegatingDeserializer {

    public UserEventDeserializer(JsonDeserializer<?> delegate) {
        super(delegate);
    }

    @Override
    protected JsonDeserializer<?> newDelegatingInstance(JsonDeserializer<?> newDelegate) {
        return new UserEventDeserializer(newDelegate);
    }

    @Override
    public User deserialize(JsonParser p, DeserializationContext ctxt)
            throws IOException {
        User result = (User) super.deserialize(p, ctxt);

        // add special logic here

        return result;
    }
}
0

Here is a oneliner using ObjectMapper

public MyObject deserialize(JsonParser p, DeserializationContext ctxt) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
    OMyObject object = new ObjectMapper().readValue(p, MyObject.class);
    // do whatever you want 
    return object;
}

And please: There is really no need to use any String value or something else. All needed information are given by JsonParser, so use it.

0

Along the lines of what Tomáš Záluský has suggested, in cases where using BeanDeserializerModifier is undesirable you can construct a default deserializer yourself using BeanDeserializerFactory, although there is some extra setup necessary. In context, this solution would look like so:

public User deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext ctxt)
  throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {

    ObjectCodec oc = jp.getCodec();
    JsonNode node = oc.readTree(jp);
    User deserializedUser = null;

    DeserializationConfig config = ctxt.getConfig();
    JavaType type = TypeFactory.defaultInstance().constructType(User.class);
    JsonDeserializer<Object> defaultDeserializer = BeanDeserializerFactory.instance.buildBeanDeserializer(ctxt, type, config.introspect(type));

    if (defaultDeserializer instanceof ResolvableDeserializer) {
        ((ResolvableDeserializer) defaultDeserializer).resolve(ctxt);
    }

    JsonParser treeParser = oc.treeAsTokens(node);
    config.initialize(treeParser);

    if (treeParser.getCurrentToken() == null) {
        treeParser.nextToken();
    }

    deserializedUser = (User) defaultDeserializer.deserialize(treeParser, context);

    return deserializedUser;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.