6

Let's say that I got the following code:

var tasks = BuildTaskList();
try
{
    Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());
}
catch (AggregateException exception)
{

}

How do I know which task threw which of the exceptions in exception.InnerExceptions?

0
9

You still have the list of Tasks, and each Task has an Exception property. Using that you can figure out which exceptions belong with which Task.

But, if you can, it'd be better to use Task.WhenAll or TaskFactory.ContinueWhenAll than do a blocking Wait.

4
  • Isn't each Task.Exception pointing to the same AggregateException exception passed to catch? – noseratio Aug 19 '13 at 12:58
  • 3
    No, each Task is unaware of the other tasks, and it will only have its own exception(s). – Matt Smith Aug 19 '13 at 13:03
  • 1
    I have a good reason to wait on all. But I guess that that information is good for others. It's a bit wierd though that the exception by itself can't identify which task failed as it can be a child task that originally failed. – jgauffin Aug 19 '13 at 13:42
  • @jgauffin, many times you can use await WhenAll instead of WaitAll. – Carlos Garcia Mar 20 '20 at 7:59
2
var throwers = tasks.Where(task => task.Exception != null);
2
  • A few tasks may have thrown there, and their exceptions are aggregated into a single AggregateException, AFAIK – noseratio Aug 19 '13 at 13:02
  • 2
    @Noseratio throwers above is a sequence of all the tasks which did throw an exception. Could be all, could be none, or could be any number inbetween - but they each have their own exception. – Matthew Watson Aug 19 '13 at 13:14
0
        var t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Console.WriteLine("Task 1"));
        var t2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Console.WriteLine("Task 2"));
        var t3 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { throw new InvalidOperationException(); });
        var t4 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Console.WriteLine("Task 4"));

        Task.Factory.ContinueWhenAll(new[] { t1, t2, t3, t4 }, tasks =>
            {
                foreach (var t in tasks)
                {
                    if (t.Status == TaskStatus.Faulted)
                    {
                        // this will run for t3
                        Console.WriteLine("This task has been faulted.");
                    }
                }
            });
0

Option1 (credit to @theodor-zoulias comment):

You can set the Exception.Data property with the task name:

var task1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    try
    {
        throw new Exception();
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        exception.Data["task"] = "task1";
        throw exception;
    }
});

var task2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    try
    {
        throw new Exception();
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        exception.Data["task"] = "task2";
        throw exception;
    }
});

try
{
    Task.WaitAll(task1, task2);
}
catch (AggregateException ae)
{
    foreach (var exception in ae.InnerExceptions)
    {
        Console.WriteLine($"Exception was thrown by {exception.Data["task"]}");
    }
}

Option2:

If you don't mind loosing the name of the exception's assembly information, You can set the Exception.Source (doc) property of the thrown exception based on the task name and look at it while iterating:

var t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => 
{
    throw new Exception() { Source = "t1" };
});
var t2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => 
{
    throw new Exception() { Source = "t2" };
});

try
{
    Task.WaitAll(t1, t2);
}
catch (AggregateException ae)
{
    foreach (var exception in ae.InnerExceptions)
    {
        Console.WriteLine($"Exception was thrown by {exception.Source}");
    }
}

Will output:

Exception was thrown by t1

Exception was thrown by t2

2
  • The Exception.Source property is intended for providing information about the assembly in which the exception originated. You are losing information by hijacking this property. For user-defined info it's better to use the Exception.Data property. – Theodor Zoulias Mar 20 '20 at 8:29
  • The Data is an IDictionary, so I don't think that your updated code compiles. – Theodor Zoulias Mar 20 '20 at 9:30

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