What's the best way to break from nested loops in Javascript?

//Write the links to the page.
for (var x = 0; x < Args.length; x++)
{
   for (var Heading in Navigation.Headings)
   {
      for (var Item in Navigation.Headings[Heading])
      {
         if (Args[x] == Navigation.Headings[Heading][Item].Name)
         {
            document.write("<a href=\"" 
               + Navigation.Headings[Heading][Item].URL + "\">" 
               + Navigation.Headings[Heading][Item].Name + "</a> : ");
            break; // <---HERE, I need to break out of two loops.
         }
      }
   }
}

13 Answers 13

up vote 752 down vote accepted

Just like Perl,

loop1:
    for (var i in set1) {
loop2:
        for (var j in set2) {
loop3:
            for (var k in set3) {
                break loop2;  // breaks out of loop3 and loop2
            }
        }
    }

as defined in EMCA-262 section 12.12. [MDN Docs]

Unlike C, these labels can only be used for continue and break, as Javascript does not have goto.

  • 6
    @NielsBom You are correct: it breaks out of the loop with the given label. It doesn't goto the label. You are essentially naming a loop and saying I want to break out of suchandsuch a loop. – devios1 May 31 '12 at 21:50
  • 285
    WTF why haven't I seen this being used somewhere in my 3 years with JavaScript :/.. – Salman Abbas Jul 21 '12 at 18:17
  • 30
    MDN says "avoid using labels" purely on readability grounds. Why is it not 'readable'? Because nobody uses them, of course. But why don't they use them? ... – XML May 2 '14 at 20:43
  • 7
    @SeantheBean Done. This does seem like the more straightforward answer and not open to abuse because it's only available to continue and break. – Gary Willoughby Nov 12 '15 at 21:17
  • 18
    @JérémyPouyet - Your logic for down voting is inane and unwarranted. It answer the OP's question perfectly. The question is not concerned with your opinions regarding legibility. Please reconsider your approach to assisting the community. – The Dembinski Jan 16 '17 at 20:01

Wrap that up in a function and then just return.

  • 9
    I choose to accept this answer because it is simple and can be implemented in an elegant fashion. I absolutely hate GOTO's and consider them bad practice (can open), Ephemient's is too near one. ;o) – Gary Willoughby Oct 8 '08 at 20:05
  • 13
    IMO, GOTO's are fine as long as they don't break structuring. But to each their own! – ephemient Oct 10 '08 at 20:09
  • 27
    Labels on for loops have absolutely nothing in common with GOTO except for their syntax. They are simply a matter to break from outer loops. You do not have any problem with breaking the innermost loop, do you? so why do you have a problem with breaking outer loops? – John Smith Mar 15 '14 at 15:12
  • 10
    Please consider accepting the other answer. If not for Andrew Hedges comment (thanks btw.), I would have thought: ah, so javascript does not have that feature. And I bet many in the community might overlook the comment and think just the same. – John Smith Mar 15 '14 at 20:38
  • 6
    Why doesn't Stack Overflow have a feature to let the community override the obviously wrong selected answer? :/ – Matt Huggins Aug 26 '14 at 23:40

I'm a little late to the party but the following is a language-agnostic approach which doesn't use GOTO/labels or function wrapping:

for (var x = Set1.length; x > 0; x--)
{
   for (var y = Set2.length; y > 0; y--)
   {
      for (var z = Set3.length; z > 0; z--)
      {
          z = y = -1; // terminates second loop
          // z = y = x = -1; // terminate first loop
      }
   }
}

On the upside it flows naturally which should please the non-GOTO crowd. On the downside, the inner loop needs to complete the current iteration before terminating so it might not be applicable in some scenarios.

  • 2
    the opening brace should not be on new lines, because js implementations may insert a colon in the end of the preceding line. – Evgeny Sep 20 '12 at 19:07
  • 18
    @Evgeny: while some JavaScript style guides call for opening braces to go on the same line, it is not incorrect to have it on a new line and there is no danger of the interpreter ambiguously inserting a semicolon. The behavior of ASI is well defined and does not apply here. – Jason Suárez Mar 6 '13 at 9:25
  • 8
    Just make sure to comment the hell out of this approach. It's not immediately obvious what's going on here. – Qix Nov 4 '14 at 16:02
  • 1
    Nice and simple answer. This should be considered as answer, as it doesnt strain the CPU intensive loops(which is a problem with using functions) or it doesn't use labels, which usually are not readable or shouldn't be used as some say. :) – Girish Sortur Nov 9 '15 at 18:09
  • I may be missing something, but to get around the problem of the inner loop having to finish that iteration could you put in a break or continue immediately after you set z and y? I do like the idea of using the for loop's conditions to kick out. Elegant in its own way. – Ben Sutton Dec 7 '15 at 18:01

I realize this is a really old topic, but since my standard approach is not here yet, I thought I post it for the future googlers.

var a, b, abort = false;
for (a = 0; a < 10 && !abort; a++) {
    for (b = 0; b < 10 && !abort; b++) {
        if (condition) {
            doSomeThing();
            abort = true;
        }
    }
}
  • If the condition evaluates to true on the first iteration of the nested loop, you still run through the rest of the 10 iterations, checking the abort value each time. This is not a performance problem for 10 iterations, but it would be with, say, 10,000. – Robusto Dec 2 '13 at 14:53
  • 7
    No, it's exiting from both loops. Here is the demonstrating fiddle. No matter what condition you set, it's exiting after it's met. – zord Dec 2 '13 at 20:13
  • 4
    Optimization would be to add a break; after setting abort = true; and removing !abort condition check from the final loop. – xer21 Sep 20 '16 at 15:43
  • 1
    I like this but I think in a general sense you would make lots of unnecessary processing - that is, for each iteration of every iterator evalueate abort and the expression. In simple scenarios that might be fine, but for huge loops with gazillion iterations that could be a problem – Z. Khullah Dec 11 '17 at 17:08
  • Another nice language-agnostic approach, although less nuanced than the one above that allows breaking to any of the nested loops. – Kim Apr 25 at 14:55
var str = "";
for (var x = 0; x < 3; x++) {
    (function() {  // here's an anonymous function
        for (var y = 0; y < 3; y++) {
            for (var z = 0; z < 3; z++) {
                // you have access to 'x' because of closures
                str += "x=" + x + "  y=" + y + "  z=" + z + "<br />";
                if (x == z && z == 2) {
                    return;
                }
            }
        }
    })();  // here, you execute your anonymous function
}

How's that? :)

  • 2
    I figured this is what swilliams was getting at – harley.333 Oct 8 '08 at 20:13
  • 17
    This adds significant runtime cost if the loop is large - a new execution context for the function must be created (and at some point freed by GC) by the Javascript interpreter/compiler (or, "compreter" these days, a mix of both) EVERY SINGLE TIME. – Mörre Oct 18 '11 at 12:29
  • 2
    This is actually quite dangerous because some weird stuff can happen that you may not be expecting. In particular, because of the closure created with var x, if any logic within the loop references x at a later point in time (for example it defines an inner anonymous function that is saved and executed later), the value for x will be whatever it was at the end of the loop, not the index that function was defined during. (cont'd) – devios1 May 31 '12 at 21:57
  • 1
    To get around this, you need to pass x as a parameter to your anonymous function so that it creates a new copy of it, which can then be referenced as a closure since it won't change from that point on. In short, I recommend ephemient's answer. – devios1 May 31 '12 at 21:57
  • 1
    As well, I think the readability thing is complete crap. This is way more vague than a label. Labels are only seen as unreadable because nobody ever uses them. – Qix Nov 4 '14 at 16:01

quite simple

var a=[1,2,3];
var b=[4,5,6];
var breakCheck1=false;

for (var i in a){
    for (var j in b){
        breakCheck1=true;
        break;
    }
    if (breakCheck1) {break;}
}
  • I agree this is actually the best, function one doesn't scale, wrapping all for loops in if also doesn't scale i.e. makes it hard to read and debug....this one is awesome. You can just declare vars loop1, loop2, loop3, and add little statement at the end. Also to break multiple loops you would need to do something like loop1=loop2=false; – Muhammad Umer Apr 9 '15 at 4:30

How about using no breaks at all, no abort flags, and no extra condition checks. This version just blasts the loop variables (makes them Number.MAX_VALUE) when the condition is met and forces all the loops to terminate elegantly.

// No breaks needed
for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
  for (var j = 0; j < 10; j++) {
    if (condition) {
      console.log("condition met");
      i = j = Number.MAX_VALUE; // Blast the loop variables
    }
  }
}

There was a similar-ish answer for decrementing-type nested loops, but this works for incrementing-type nested loops without needing to consider each loop's termination value for simple loops.

Another example:

// No breaks needed
for (var i = 0; i < 89; i++) {
  for (var j = 0; j < 1002; j++) {
    for (var k = 0; k < 16; k++) {
      for (var l = 0; l < 2382; l++) {
        if (condition) {
          console.log("condition met");
          i = j = k = l = Number.MAX_VALUE; // Blast the loop variables
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

How about pushing loops to their end limits

    for(var a=0; a<data_a.length; a++){
       for(var b=0; b<data_b.length; b++){
           for(var c=0; c<data_c.length; c++){
              for(var d=0; d<data_d.length; d++){
                 a =  data_a.length;
                 b =  data_b.length;
                 c =  data_b.length;
                 d =  data_d.length;
            }
         }
       }
     }
  • 1
    I think Drakes answer has the same logic in a more succinct and clear manner. – Engineer Toast Nov 9 '17 at 17:02
  • absolutely brilliant! – geoyws Dec 26 '17 at 20:23

If you use Coffeescript, there is a convenient "do" keyword that makes it easier to define and immediately execute an anonymous function:

do ->
  for a in first_loop
    for b in second_loop
      if condition(...)
        return

...so you can simply use "return" to get out of the loops.

  • This isn't the same. My original example has three for loops not two. – Gary Willoughby Jul 19 '17 at 20:23

I thought I'd show a functional-programming approach. You can break out of nested Array.prototype.some() and/or Array.prototype.every() functions, as in my solutions. An added benefit of this approach is that Object.keys() enumerates only an object's own enumerable properties, whereas "a for-in loop enumerates properties in the prototype chain as well".

Close to the OP's solution:

    Args.forEach(function (arg) {
        // This guard is not necessary,
        // since writing an empty string to document would not change it.
        if (!getAnchorTag(arg))
            return;

        document.write(getAnchorTag(arg));
    });

    function getAnchorTag (name) {
        var res = '';

        Object.keys(Navigation.Headings).some(function (Heading) {
            return Object.keys(Navigation.Headings[Heading]).some(function (Item) {
                if (name == Navigation.Headings[Heading][Item].Name) {
                    res = ("<a href=\""
                                 + Navigation.Headings[Heading][Item].URL + "\">"
                                 + Navigation.Headings[Heading][Item].Name + "</a> : ");
                    return true;
                }
            });
        });

        return res;
    }

Solution that reduces iterating over the Headings/Items:

    var remainingArgs = Args.slice(0);

    Object.keys(Navigation.Headings).some(function (Heading) {
        return Object.keys(Navigation.Headings[Heading]).some(function (Item) {
            var i = remainingArgs.indexOf(Navigation.Headings[Heading][Item].Name);

            if (i === -1)
                return;

            document.write("<a href=\""
                                         + Navigation.Headings[Heading][Item].URL + "\">"
                                         + Navigation.Headings[Heading][Item].Name + "</a> : ");
            remainingArgs.splice(i, 1);

            if (remainingArgs.length === 0)
                return true;
            }
        });
    });
XXX.Validation = function() {
    var ok = false;
loop:
    do {
        for (...) {
            while (...) {
                if (...) {
                    break loop; // Exist the outermost do-while loop
                }
                if (...) {
                    continue; // skips current iteration in the while loop
                }
            }
        }
        if (...) {
            break loop;
        }
        if (...) {
            break loop;
        }
        if (...) {
            break loop;
        }
        if (...) {
            break loop;
        }
        ok = true;
        break;
    } while(true);
    CleanupAndCallbackBeforeReturning(ok);
    return ok;
};
  • 9
    This looks more confusing then the original. – Cristiano Fontes Oct 11 '12 at 11:11
  • 20
    Like a postmodern poem – Digerkam May 14 '13 at 8:51
  • Voted up because a do while is more becoming to this type of scenario (in most cases). – Cody Sep 9 '13 at 14:49

the best way is -
1) Sort the both array which are used in first and second loop.
2) if item matched then break the inner loop and hold the index value.
3) when start next iteration start inner loop with hold index value.

I know this was asked 8 years ago but in ES6 we got the for...of loop which enables the use of standard break functionality:

for (let item of items) {
  if (item.id === id) {
    //do something cool
    break;
  }
}
  • 15
    So how do you break out of two loops like this? That's the whole point of the question. – Gary Willoughby Jul 19 '17 at 20:22

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