70

Lets say I have a MultiIndex Series s:

>>> s
     values
a b
1 2  0.1 
3 6  0.3
4 4  0.7

and I want to apply a function which uses the index of the row:

def f(x):
   # conditions or computations using the indexes
   if x.index[0] and ...: 
   other = sum(x.index) + ...
   return something

How can I do s.apply(f) for such a function? What is the recommended way to make this kind of operations? I expect to obtain a new Series with the values resulting from this function applied on each row and the same MultiIndex.

2
45

I don't believe apply has access to the index; it treats each row as a numpy object, not a Series, as you can see:

In [27]: s.apply(lambda x: type(x))
Out[27]: 
a  b
1  2    <type 'numpy.float64'>
3  6    <type 'numpy.float64'>
4  4    <type 'numpy.float64'>

To get around this limitation, promote the indexes to columns, apply your function, and recreate a Series with the original index.

Series(s.reset_index().apply(f, axis=1).values, index=s.index)

Other approaches might use s.get_level_values, which often gets a little ugly in my opinion, or s.iterrows(), which is likely to be slower -- perhaps depending on exactly what f does.

6
  • Also worth noting that vectorising f, and using & | etc., may also be faster. Aug 19 '13 at 14:54
  • Currently I use the reset_index approach, will hold a little to see if someone proposes a cleaner solution.
    – elyase
    Aug 19 '13 at 14:54
  • 4
    +1 For getting rid of the MultiIndex. While these are occasionally useful, more and more I find myself turning my indices into columns. Aug 19 '13 at 15:50
  • 1
    In my case (a dataframe, with axis=1), x.name() returns the value of the index when I apply a function lambda x: x ...
    – Christophe
    Sep 24 '15 at 15:30
  • Which is totally moronic behaviour but ye, what you say is completely right, however your solution is not ideal, for most use cases Jeff's answer DataFrame(s).apply(x) is much more straightforward and should be the accepted answer IMHO!
    – meow
    Mar 4 '19 at 11:14
15

Make it a frame, return scalars if you want (so the result is a series)

Setup

In [11]: s = Series([1,2,3],dtype='float64',index=['a','b','c'])

In [12]: s
Out[12]: 
a    1
b    2
c    3
dtype: float64

Printing function

In [13]: def f(x):
    print type(x), x
    return x
   ....: 

In [14]: pd.DataFrame(s).apply(f)
<class 'pandas.core.series.Series'> a    1
b    2
c    3
Name: 0, dtype: float64
<class 'pandas.core.series.Series'> a    1
b    2
c    3
Name: 0, dtype: float64
Out[14]: 
   0
a  1
b  2
c  3

Since you can return anything here, just return the scalars (access the index via the name attribute)

In [15]: pd.DataFrame(s).apply(lambda x: 5 if x.name == 'a' else x[0] ,1)
Out[15]: 
a    5
b    2
c    3
dtype: float64
2
  • 1
    so when calling apply on DataFrame its index will be accessible through name of each series? I see this also is true for DateTimeIndex but it is a little weird to use something similar to x.name == Time(2015-06-27 20:08:32.097333+00:00)
    – dashesy
    Jun 28 '15 at 17:03
  • 3
    This should be the answer, adopting x.name is the cleanest and most flexible way of addressing the problem. May 31 '17 at 10:20
11

Convert to DataFrame and apply along row. You can access the index as x.name. x is also a Series now with 1 value

s.to_frame(0).apply(f, axis=1)[0]
1

You may find it faster to use where rather than apply here:

In [11]: s = pd.Series([1., 2., 3.], index=['a' ,'b', 'c'])

In [12]: s.where(s.index != 'a', 5)
Out[12]: 
a    5
b    2
c    3
dtype: float64

Also you can use numpy-style logic/functions to any of the parts:

In [13]: (2 * s + 1).where((s.index == 'b') | (s.index == 'c'), -s)
Out[13]: 
a   -1
b    5
c    7
dtype: float64

In [14]: (2 * s + 1).where(s.index != 'a', -s)
Out[14]: 
a   -1
b    5
c    7
dtype: float64

I recommend testing for speed (as efficiency against apply will depend on the function). Although, I find that applys are more readable...

5
  • 2
    Hm. Now I wonder if there should be a Series.eval/query method...I'll bring this up over at pandas. Aug 19 '13 at 15:54
  • 1
    @PhillipCloud, +1, I need to use indices a lot(add/subs, aligns and missing data) and this would be great to have.
    – elyase
    Aug 19 '13 at 16:38
  • I'm finding increasingly more often that if I convert my MultiIndexes to columns I'm much happier and life is easier. There's so much more you can do with columns in a DataFrame than a Series with a MultiIndex, in fact they are essentially the same thing, except queries will be faster in the DataFrame columns than in the Series-with-MultiIndex. Aug 19 '13 at 16:50
  • @PhillipCloud I'm the same, they should really be first class citizens (rather than the opposite). Aug 19 '13 at 17:13
  • This doesn't answer the question "Access index in pandas.Series.apply"
    – luca
    Nov 30 '17 at 15:37
0

You can access the whole row as argument inside the fucntion if you use DataFrame.apply() instead of Series.apply().

def f1(row):
    if row['I'] < 0.5:
        return 0
    else:
        return 1

def f2(row):
    if row['N1']==1:
        return 0
    else:
        return 1

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df4 = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(6,1), columns=list('I'))
df4['N1']=df4.apply(f1, axis=1)
df4['N2']=df4.apply(f2, axis=1)
0

Use reset_index() to convert the Series to a DataFrame and the index to a column, and then apply your function to the DataFrame.

The tricky part is knowing how reset_index() names the columns, so here are a couple of examples.

With a Singly Indexed Series

s=pd.Series({'idx1': 'val1', 'idx2': 'val2'})

def use_index_and_value(row):
    return 'I made this with index {} and value {}'.format(row['index'], row[0])

s2 = s.reset_index().apply(use_index_and_value, axis=1)

# The new Series has an auto-index;
# You'll want to replace that with the index from the original Series
s2.index = s.index
s2

Output:

idx1    I made this with index idx1 and value val1
idx2    I made this with index idx2 and value val2
dtype: object

With a Multi-Indexed Series

Same concept here, but you'll need to access the index values as row['level_*'] because that's where they're placed by Series.reset_index().

s=pd.Series({
    ('idx(0,0)', 'idx(0,1)'): 'val1',
    ('idx(1,0)', 'idx(1,1)'): 'val2'
})

def use_index_and_value(row):
    return 'made with index: {},{} & value: {}'.format(
        row['level_0'],
        row['level_1'],
        row[0]
    )

s2 = s.reset_index().apply(use_index_and_value, axis=1)

# Replace auto index with the index from the original Series
s2.index = s.index
s2

Output:

idx(0,0)  idx(0,1)    made with index: idx(0,0),idx(0,1) & value: val1
idx(1,0)  idx(1,1)    made with index: idx(1,0),idx(1,1) & value: val2
dtype: object

If your series or indexes have names, you will need to adjust accordingly.

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