0

In c# is there a quick way to replace the following with more efficient code:

string letters = "a,b,c,d,e,f";

if (letters.Contains("a"))
{
    return true;
}

if (letters.Contains("b"))
{
    return true;
}

if (letters.Contains("c"))
{
    return true;
}

I want to do away with having to have three compare lines of code.

Thanks!

  • Use a switch case. – user1477388 Aug 20 '13 at 13:37
  • use linq here is an example stackoverflow.com/questions/194930/… – MethodMan Aug 20 '13 at 13:38
  • what s your use case? where do u get letters or input from? – DarthVader Aug 20 '13 at 13:38
  • 2
    return letters.Contains("a") || letters.Contains("b") || letters.Contains("c")? – Corak Aug 20 '13 at 13:38
  • 2
    Just as an aside to all the answers below (which are all fine), I would suggest you create an extension method or reusable static method to do the work for you and hide the implementation details. Nothing beats your own custom signatures like letters.HasAny("abc") or letters.HasAny('a', 'b', 'c'), or if the "abc" check is common, letters.HasABC() (or whatever name/signature makes the most sense for you). Internally, that extension method implementation can use any of the ideas below, be optimized for speed or maintenance or flexibility, or whathaveyou. – Chris Sinclair Aug 20 '13 at 13:48
8

You could use something like this:

return letters.Any(c => c == 'a' || c == 'b' || c == 'c');

Or this:

var lettersToLookFor = "abc";
return letters.Any(c => lettersToLookFor.Contains(c));

As per the comments, the last line of the previous code block can be shortened further:

return letters.Any(lettersToLookFor.Contains);
  • 1
    +1 for the second solution – Andrew Coonce Aug 20 '13 at 13:40
  • 1
    +1 as well for the second much more streamlined and easier to read.. – MethodMan Aug 20 '13 at 13:42
  • 3
    Or even: letters.Any(lettersToLookFor.Contains). – Corak Aug 20 '13 at 13:43
  • @Corak: Correct. Added it to my answer, thanks. – Daniel Hilgarth Aug 20 '13 at 13:48
  • Second solution worked perfectly! Thanks! – Rob McCabe Aug 20 '13 at 13:53
4

If you're literally looking for single characters in a string you can use IndexOfAny

return letters.IndexOfAny('a', 'b', 'c') >= 0;

It makes one pass over the entire string and compares each char in the string against the chars passed in.

If none of the chars exist it's still M * N comparisons (same as 3 if's above), but if any char does exist it gets out of dodge faster.
Also for longer strings it's kinder on CPU cache memory.

3

You can use Intersect to see if there are any characters in common between the two character sets. Note that strings implement IEnumerable<char>, so you can treat all strings as just sequences of characters.

bool result = "abc".Intersect(letters).Any();

Note that this solution, as it will put all of the characters from letters into a HashSet, will be dramatically more efficient than the other solutions currently posted that are performing multiple linear searches on the string, assuming the string is of a non-trivial size, and the search characters are not right near the start. (You did say efficiency mattered.)

  • "Dramatically more efficient": This completely depends on the actual string. – Daniel Hilgarth Aug 20 '13 at 13:58
  • @DanielHilgarth Right, edited. – Servy Aug 20 '13 at 14:00
1

Simplest solution would be to club three if in single statement or can use Any() like Daniel mentioned.

if (letters.Contains("a") || letters.Contains("b") || letters.Contains("c"))
{
    return true;
}
1

LINQ is the way to go.

return letters.Any(c => c == 'a' || c == 'b' || c == 'c');
  • Dam, Daniel beat me by a minute – Maxime R.C Aug 20 '13 at 13:40
0
var arr = new []{"a","b","c"};
letters.Any(m => arr.Contains(m))
0

How about using String.IndexOfAny(Char[]) method like?

string letters = "a,b,c,d,e,f";

if ((letters.IndexOfAny(new char[] { 'a', 'b', 'c' }) >= 0))
{
   return true;
}

The zero-based index position of the first occurrence in this instance where any character in anyOf was found; -1 if no character in anyOf was found.

  • >= 0, not > 0. -1 is failure – xanatos Aug 20 '13 at 13:45
  • @xanatos Ups, thanks. – Soner Gönül Aug 20 '13 at 13:45
0

You could use a regular expression, I couldn't vouch for the efficiency though, you'd have to run a comparison and get timings:

return Regex.IsMatch(letters, "[abc]");

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