214

Is it possible to unsubscribe an anonymous method from an event?

If I subscribe to an event like this:

void MyMethod()
{
    Console.WriteLine("I did it!");
}

MyEvent += MyMethod;

I can un-subscribe like this:

MyEvent -= MyMethod;

But if I subscribe using an anonymous method:

MyEvent += delegate(){Console.WriteLine("I did it!");};

is it possible to unsubscribe this anonymous method? If so, how?

11 Answers 11

221
Action myDelegate = delegate(){Console.WriteLine("I did it!");};

MyEvent += myDelegate;


// .... later

MyEvent -= myDelegate;

Just keep a reference to the delegate around.

139

One technique is to declare a variable to hold the anonymous method which would then be available inside the anonymous method itself. This worked for me because the desired behavior was to unsubscribe after the event was handled.

Example:

MyEventHandler foo = null;
foo = delegate(object s, MyEventArgs ev)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("I did it!");
        MyEvent -= foo;
    };
MyEvent += foo;
  • 1
    Using this kind of code, Resharper complains about accessing a modified closure... is this approach reliable? I mean, are we sure that the 'foo' variable inside the body of the anonymous method, really references the anonymous method itself? – BladeWise Jul 28 '10 at 15:13
  • 7
    I found an answer to my dubt, and it is that 'foo' will truly hold a reference to the anonymous method itslef. The captured variable is modified, since it is captured before the anonymous method get assigned to it. – BladeWise Jul 29 '10 at 7:23
  • 2
    That's exactly what I needed! I was missing the =null. (MyEventHandler foo = delegate {... MyEvent-=foo;}; MyEvent+=foo; didn't work...) – TDaver Feb 21 '11 at 10:33
  • Resharper 6.1 doesn't complain if you declare it as an array. Seems a little weird, but I'm going to blindly trust my tools on this one: MyEventHandler[] foo = { null }; foo[0] = ... { ... MyEvent -= foo[0]; }; MyEvent += foo[0]; – Mike Post Mar 14 '12 at 3:06
21

From memory, the specification explicitly doesn't guarantee the behaviour either way when it comes to equivalence of delegates created with anonymous methods.

If you need to unsubscribe, you should either use a "normal" method or retain the delegate somewhere else so you can unsubscribe with exactly the same delegate you used to subscribe.

  • I Jon, what do you meen ? I don't understand. does the solution exposed by "J c" will not work properly ? – Eric Ouellet Oct 17 '12 at 13:33
  • @EricOuellet: That answer is basically an implementation of "retain the delegate somewhere else so you can unsubscribe with exactly the same delegate you used to subscribe". – Jon Skeet Oct 17 '12 at 13:38
  • Jon, I'm sorry, I read your answer many times trying to figure out what you mean and where the "J c" solution does not use the same delegate to subscribe and unsubscribe, but I can't fint it. Pehaps you can point me on an article that explain what you are saying ? I know about your reputation and I would really like to understand what you mean, anything you can link to would be really appreciate. – Eric Ouellet Oct 18 '12 at 12:59
  • 1
    I found : msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms366768.aspx but they do recommend not using anonymous but they do not say that there is any major problem ? – Eric Ouellet Oct 18 '12 at 13:02
  • I found it... Thanks a lot (see Michael Blome answer): social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/csharplanguage/thread/… – Eric Ouellet Oct 18 '12 at 13:11
16

In 3.0 can be shortened to:

MyHandler myDelegate = ()=>Console.WriteLine("I did it!");
MyEvent += myDelegate;
...
MyEvent -= myDelegate;
10

Since C# 7.0 local functions feature has been released, the approach suggested by J c becomes really neat.

void foo(object s, MyEventArgs ev)
{
    Console.WriteLine("I did it!");
    MyEvent -= foo;
};
MyEvent += foo;

So, honestly, you do not have an anonymous function as a variable here. But I suppose the motivation to use it in your case can be applied to local functions.

  • To make the readability even better, you can move the MyEvent += foo; line to be before the declaration of foo. – Mark Zhukovsky Sep 24 at 14:56
9

Instead of keeping a reference to any delegate you can instrument your class in order to give the event's invocation list back to the caller. Basically you can write something like this (assuming that MyEvent is declared inside MyClass):

public class MyClass 
{
  public event EventHandler MyEvent;

  public IEnumerable<EventHandler> GetMyEventHandlers()  
  {  
      return from d in MyEvent.GetInvocationList()  
             select (EventHandler)d;  
  }  
}

So you can access the whole invocation list from outside MyClass and unsubscribe any handler you want. For instance:

myClass.MyEvent -= myClass.GetMyEventHandlers().Last();

I've written a full post about this tecnique here.

  • 2
    Does this mean I could accidentally unsubscribe a different instance (i.e. not me) from the event if they subscribed after me? – dumbledad Mar 25 '14 at 22:53
  • @dumbledad of course this would alaways deregister the last registered one. If you wanted to dynamically unsubscribe a specific anonymous delegate, you need to somehow identify it. I'd suggest keeping a reference then :) – LuckyLikey Jun 2 '16 at 13:24
  • Its pretty cool, what you are doing, but I can't imagine one case where this could be useful. But i't does really solve the OP's Question. --> +1. IMHO, one should simply not use anonymous delegates if they should be deregistered later. Keeping them is stupid --> better use Method. Removing just some delegate in Invocation list is pretty random and useless. Correct me if im wrong. :) – LuckyLikey Jun 2 '16 at 13:35
6

Kind of lame approach:

public class SomeClass
{
  private readonly IList<Action> _eventList = new List<Action>();

  ...

  public event Action OnDoSomething
  {
    add {
      _eventList.Add(value);
    }
    remove {
      _eventList.Remove(value);
    }
  }
}
  1. Override the event add/remove methods.
  2. Keep a list of those event handlers.
  3. When needed, clear them all and re-add the others.

This may not work or be the most efficient method, but should get the job done.

  • 14
    If you think it's lame, don't post it. – Jerry Nixon Mar 4 '11 at 15:48
2

If you want to be able to control unsubscription then you need to go the route indicated in your accepted answer. However, if you are just concerned about clearing up references when your subscribing class goes out of scope, then there is another (slightly convoluted) solution which involves using weak references. I've just posted a question and answer on this topic.

2

One simple solution:

just pass the eventhandle variable as parameter to itself. Event if you have the case that you cannot access the original created variable because of multithreading, you can use this:

MyEventHandler foo = null;
foo = (s, ev, mehi) => MyMethod(s, ev, foo);
MyEvent += foo;

void MyMethod(object s, MyEventArgs ev, MyEventHandler myEventHandlerInstance)
{
    MyEvent -= myEventHandlerInstance;
    Console.WriteLine("I did it!");
}
  • what if MyEvent is invoked twice, before MyEvent -= myEventHandlerInstance; is ran? If it's possible, you'd have an error. But im not sure if that's the case. – LuckyLikey Jun 2 '16 at 13:27
0

if you want refer to some object with this delegate, may be you can use Delegate.CreateDelegate(Type, Object target, MethodInfo methodInfo) .net consider the delegate equals by target and methodInfo

0

If the best way is to keep a reference on the subscribed eventHandler, this can be achieved using a Dictionary.

In this example, I have to use a anonymous method to include the mergeColumn parameter for a set of DataGridViews.

Using the MergeColumn method with the enable parameter set to true enables the event while using it with false disables it.

static Dictionary<DataGridView, PaintEventHandler> subscriptions = new Dictionary<DataGridView, PaintEventHandler>();

public static void MergeColumns(this DataGridView dg, bool enable, params ColumnGroup[] mergedColumns) {

    if(enable) {
        subscriptions[dg] = (s, e) => Dg_Paint(s, e, mergedColumns);
        dg.Paint += subscriptions[dg];
    }
    else {
        if(subscriptions.ContainsKey(dg)) {
            dg.Paint -= subscriptions[dg];
            subscriptions.Remove(dg);
        }
    }
}

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