47

I make a http put request with following parameters:

{"post"=>{"files"=>{"file1"=>"file_content_1", "file2"=>"file_content_2"}}, "id"=>"4"}

and i need to permit hash array in my code. based on manuals I've tried like these:

> params.require(:post).permit(:files) # does not work
> params.require(:post).permit(:files => {}) # does not work, empty hash as result
> params.require(:post).permit! # works, but all params are enabled

How to make it correctly?

UPD1: file1, file2 - are dynamic keys

  • Try params.require(:post).permit(:files => [:file1, :file2]) – user2801 Aug 21 '13 at 6:11
  • 3
    It's not an option: file1, file2 are dynamic keys. – rdo Aug 21 '13 at 6:11
  • 1
    For Rails 5.1 please see stackoverflow.com/a/44891190/1414100 – Chk Sep 11 '17 at 20:38

12 Answers 12

53

By design strong params doesn't allow hashes with dynamic keys as values, in this case you need to whitelist files by calling permit!

params.require(:post).tap do |whitelisted|
  whitelisted[:files] = params[:post][:files].permit!
end

For Rails 4 and below you do it without calling permit!

params.require(:post).tap do |whitelisted|
  whitelisted[:files] = params[:post][:files]
end
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    FYI in rails 5.0 you'll need to call permit! on params[:post][:files] for it to work – Stephen Corwin Jul 17 '19 at 20:15
  • @StephenCorwin can you point to some documentation please?, if that's the case I'll update the answer – Orlando Jul 19 '19 at 1:15
  • How can this allows to permit and forbid some parameters later on? – Victor Mar 24 at 6:37
45

In rails 5.1.2, this works now:

params.require(:post).permit(:files => {})

See https://github.com/rails/rails/commit/e86524c0c5a26ceec92895c830d1355ae47a7034

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    but what if files is nested multiple levels deep? e.g. params['post']['mymodel_attributes']['things']['files'] and files can be a hash with any keys? – Tilo Apr 5 '18 at 23:22
  • The syntax :files => {} will allow nested params in files to any level. – Derek Apr 6 '18 at 3:51
  • 1
    unfortunately that didn't work for me. It resulted in a literal {} in the filtered params. I worked around it though :P Deeply nested input data for StrongParams is not fun to deal with. Improvements in the StrongParameter syntax would be good. – Tilo Apr 7 '18 at 17:12
  • 1
    Hmm, it's working fine for me in rails 5.1.5. Glad you found a work-around. – Derek Apr 9 '18 at 16:13
  • 3
    Please note that if you have several permitted parameters in post, the hash one (files in this case) has to be the last one in the permit() list or you'll get a syntax error. – gfd Jan 20 at 17:54
17

I understand that this is an old post. However, a Google search brought me to this result, and I wanted to share my findings:

Here is an alternative solution that I have found that works (Rails 4):

params = ActionController::Parameters.new({"post"=>{"files"=>{"file1"=>"file_content_1", "file2"=>"file_content_2"}}, "id"=>"4"})
params.require(:post).permit(files: params[:post][:files].keys)
# Returns: {"files"=>{"file1"=>"file_content_1", "file2"=>"file_content_2"}}

The difference between this answer and the accepted answer, is that this solution restricts the parameter to only 1 level of dynamic keys. The accepted answer permits multiple depths.

[Edit] Useful tip from comment

"Oh, and you need to verify that params[:post][.files] exists otherwise keys will fail"

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Oh, and you need to verify that params[:post][.files] exists otherwise keys will fail – Christer Fernstrom Apr 28 '16 at 13:39
  • A neat idea actually (with caveats) – prusswan Sep 8 '16 at 9:05
  • In the callback you can do whatever you want, the idea is to provide a way to do things, not to allow people to copy paste stuff – Orlando Feb 13 '17 at 17:10
  • @ChristerFernstrom, I believe if you change the suggested solution from: params.require(:post).permit(files: params[:post][:files].keys) to params.require(:post).permit(files: params[:post].require(:files).keys) then verifying that params[:post][.files] exists will already happen for you, so you won't ever call .keys on nil. – rmacklin Aug 22 '17 at 0:42
5

Orlando's answer works, but the resulting parameter set returns false from the permitted? method. Also it's not clear how you would proceed if you were to later have other parameters in the post hash that you want included in the result.

Here's another way

permitted_params = params.require(:post).permit(:other, :parameters)
permitted_params.merge(params[:post][:files])
| improve this answer | |
5

Here's what we had to do in Rails 5.0.0, hope this helps someone.

files = params[:post].delete(:files) if params[:post][:files]
params.require(:post).permit(:id).tap do |whitelisted|
  whitelisted[:files] = files.permit!
end
| improve this answer | |
  • Nice approach. Really helped me. Thanks @Garry! – mikej Aug 24 '17 at 21:27
2

In my case, there was just one attribute which had dynamic keys,

def post_params
  marking_keys = Set.new
  params[:post][:marking].keys.collect {|ii| marking_keys.add(ii)}
  params.require(:post).permit(:name, marking: marking_keys.to_a)
end
| improve this answer | |
1

Here is another way to get around this:

  def post_params
    permit_key_params(params[:post]) do
      params.require(:post)
    end
  end

  def permit_key_params(hash)
    permitted_params = yield
    dynamic_keys = hash.keys
    dynamic_keys.each do |key|
      values = hash.delete(key)
      permitted_params[key] = values if values
    end
    permitted_params
  end

This should work for post: { something: {...}, something_else: {...} }

| improve this answer | |
1

You can use a temporary variable to build your permitted list like so:

permitted = params.require(:post).permit(:id)
permitted[:post][:files] = params[:post][:files].permit!
| improve this answer | |
1

Here's a simple way to do it (works for rails 5):

  def my_params
    data_params = preset_data_params

    params.require(:my_stuff).permit(
      :some,
      :stuff,
      data: data_params
    )
  end

  def preset_data_params
    return {} unless params[:my_stuff]
    return {} unless params[:my_stuff][:data]

    params[:my_stuff][:data].keys
  end
| improve this answer | |
0
    Send params as array type like name=date[]**strong text**
      def user_post
        dates = params[:date]
        #render json: { 'response' => params }
        i = 0
        dates.each do |date|
          locations = params['location_'+"#{i}"]
          user_names = params['user_'+"#{i}"]
          currency_rates = params['currency_'+"#{i}"]
          flags = params['flag_'+"#{i}"]
          j = 0
          locations.each do |location|
             User.new(user_name: user_names[j], currency_name: flags[j],
             currency_rate: currency_rates[j], currency_flag: flags[j], location: location).save
            j =+ 1
          end
          i =+ 1
        end
   def
| improve this answer | |
0

I could not get any of the many proposed answers to work (Rails 5) without either:

  1. knowing all the hash keys in advance, or
  2. virtually negating the value of strong parameters by allowing arbitrary params.

I'm using this solution.
It uses the standard strong parameters rig to clean up most of the params, and the Hash attribute is added back in explicitly.

# Assuming:
class MyObject < ApplicationRecord
  serialize :hash_attr as: Hash
  #...
end

# MyObjectsController method to filter params:
def my_object_params
  # capture the hashed attribute value, as a Hash
  hash_attr = params[:my_object] && params[:my_object][:hash_attr] ?
      params[my_object][:hash_attr].to_unsafe_h : {}
  # clean up the params
  safe_params = params.require(:my_object).permit(:attr1, :attr2) # ... etc
  # and add the hashed value back in
  safe_params.to_unsafe_h.merge hash_attr: hash_attr
end
| improve this answer | |
0

Let's use a more complicated subset of data:

task: {
  code: "Some Task",
  enabled: '1',
  subtask_attributes: { 
    '1' => { field: 'something', rules: {length_10: true, phone: false, presence: false }} ,
    '2' => { field: 'another', rules: {length_10: true, phone: false, presence: false }} 
  }
}

So we send it to Strong Parameters for processing:

params = ActionController::Parameters.new({
  task: {
    code: "Some Task",
    enabled: '1',
    subtask_attributes: { 
     '1' => { field: 'something', rules: {length_10: true, phone: false, presence: false }} ,
     '2' => { field: 'another', rules: {length_10: true, phone: false, presence: false }} 
    }
  }
})

We will not be able to specify :rules in Strong Params in Rails 4 because it is a hash of data:

permitted = params.require(:task).permit(:code, :enabled, subtask_attributes: [:field, :rules])
Unpermitted parameter: rules
Unpermitted parameter: rules

So what if you want to whitelist specific attributes AND a COLLECTION of hashes of data. The accepted answer does not whitelist specified attributes. You have to do this:

params.require(:task).permit(
    :code, :enabled,
    subtask_attributes: [:field, :rules],
)

# whitelist the validation rules hash
params.require(:task).tap do |whitelisted|
  params[:task][:subtask_attributes].each do |k,v|
    whitelisted[:subtask_attributes][k] = params[:task][:subtask_attributes][k]
    whitelisted.permit!
  end
end

After trying several of the solutions here, none worked. Only aboved worked for nested attributes in a has_many association which contains arbitrary hash data.

| improve this answer | |

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