68

I am trying to figure out how you could go about importing and using a .dll at runtime inside a C# application. Using Assembly.LoadFile() I have managed to get my program to load the dll (this part is definitely working as I am able to get the name of the class with ToString()), however I am unable to use the 'Output' method from inside my console application. I am compiling the .dll then moving it into my console's project. Is there an extra step between CreateInstance and then being able to use the methods?

This is the class in my DLL:

namespace DLL
{
    using System;

    public class Class1
    {
        public void Output(string s)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(s);
        }
    }
}

and here is the application I want to load the DLL

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    using System;
    using System.Reflection;

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var DLL = Assembly.LoadFile(@"C:\visual studio 2012\Projects\ConsoleApplication1\ConsoleApplication1\DLL.dll");

            foreach(Type type in DLL.GetExportedTypes())
            {
                var c = Activator.CreateInstance(type);
                c.Output(@"Hello");
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
96

Members must be resolvable at compile time to be called directly from C#. Otherwise you must use reflection or dynamic objects.

Reflection

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    using System;
    using System.Reflection;

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var DLL = Assembly.LoadFile(@"C:\visual studio 2012\Projects\ConsoleApplication1\ConsoleApplication1\DLL.dll");

            foreach(Type type in DLL.GetExportedTypes())
            {
                var c = Activator.CreateInstance(type);
                type.InvokeMember("Output", BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, c, new object[] {@"Hello"});
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

Dynamic (.NET 4.0)

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    using System;
    using System.Reflection;

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var DLL = Assembly.LoadFile(@"C:\visual studio 2012\Projects\ConsoleApplication1\ConsoleApplication1\DLL.dll");

            foreach(Type type in DLL.GetExportedTypes())
            {
                dynamic c = Activator.CreateInstance(type);
                c.Output(@"Hello");
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
  • 7
    Note that this tries to call Output on every type in the assembly, which will likely throw before the "right" class is found... – Reed Copsey Aug 21 '13 at 16:08
  • 1
    @ReedCopsey, Agreed, but for his simple example, his type is the only one visible. "The only types visible outside an assembly are public types and public types nested within other public types." For a non-trivial example, obviously this will be an issue... – Dark Falcon Aug 21 '13 at 16:13
  • 1
    Neat with the two examples! :) – Niels Abildgaard Mar 6 '14 at 22:16
  • 12
    This is why interfaces are often used and you can do feature detection such as IDog dog = someInstance as IDog; and test if it is not null. Put your interfaces in a common DLL shared by clients, and any plugin that will be loaded dynamically must implement that interface. This will then let you code your client against the IDog interface and have intellisense+strong type checking at compile time rather than use dynamic. – AaronLS Nov 9 '14 at 20:38
  • you may put c.Output in a try catch block and when you catch the exception continue so that as @ReedCopsey said this doesn't throw before the class is found. – Alan Deep Apr 14 '18 at 4:14
31

Right now, you're creating an instance of every type defined in the assembly. You only need to create a single instance of Class1 in order to call the method:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var DLL = Assembly.LoadFile(@"C:\visual studio 2012\Projects\ConsoleApplication1\ConsoleApplication1\DLL.dll");

        var theType = DLL.GetType("DLL.Class1");
        var c = Activator.CreateInstance(theType);
        var method = theType.GetMethod("Output");
        method.Invoke(c, new object[]{@"Hello"});

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
11

You need to create an instance of the type that expose the Output method:

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var DLL = Assembly.LoadFile(@"C:\visual studio 2012\Projects\ConsoleApplication1\ConsoleApplication1\DLL.dll");

        var class1Type = DLL.GetType("DLL.Class1");

        //Now you can use reflection or dynamic to call the method. I will show you the dynamic way

        dynamic c = Activator.CreateInstance(class1Type);
        c.Output(@"Hello");

        Console.ReadLine();
     }
  • Thank you so much - this is just what I am looking for. I can't believe this isn't higher rated than the other answers, since it shows the use of the dynamic keyword. – skiphoppy Mar 24 '16 at 16:47
  • Ah, now I see it was in DarkFalcon's answer as well. Yours was shorter and made it easier to see, though. :) – skiphoppy Mar 24 '16 at 16:51
0

Activator.CreateInstance() returns an object, which doesn't have an Output method.

It looks like you come from dynamic programming languages? C# is definetly not that, and what you are trying to do will be difficult.

Since you are loading a specific dll from a specific location, maybe you just want to add it as a reference to your console application?

If you absolutely want to load the assembly via Assembly.Load, you will have to go via reflection to call any members on c

Something like type.GetMethod("Output").Invoke(c, null); should do it.

-2

It's not so difficult.

You can inspect the available functions of the loaded object, and if you find the one you're looking for by name, then snoop its expected parms, if any. If it's the call you're trying to find, then call it using the MethodInfo object's Invoke method.

Another option is to simply build your external objects to an interface, and cast the loaded object to that interface. If successful, call the function natively.

This is pretty simple stuff.

  • Wow, not sure why the down-votes. I have a production application doing exactly this for like the past 12 years. * shrug * Anyone needs some code to do this, shoot me a message. I'll package up portions of my production code and send it along. – ChrisH Sep 23 '16 at 11:26
  • 1
    I suspect the downvotes would have to do with the lack of examples and condensing tone... Seems like you have the basis for a full answer though, so don't be afraid to edit in more details :) – Shadow Aug 2 '18 at 5:29

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