15

I have a package that I've been building using checkinstall for a while now, and I wanted to automate it (pass the values in via command line instead of typing the selection, pasting the value in, etc...)

I am not sure if this is a checkinstall bug, or not, but how can I include multiple packages via the command line --requires option. It seems to barf if I include the minimum version of a package (for exmple --requires="libvte9 (>= 0.28.2)"), or multiple packages at once (for example --requires "libvte9, libc6")

Has anyone had better success with the command line arguments for multiple packages? Am I doing something wrong, or is this a bug.

Note: If I run the script, and choose the requires option (10), and paste my entire line with multiple packages and minimum versions (such as libvte9 (>= 0.28.2), libc6 (>= 2.13), it works fine, it just seems to be on the command line that it's having issues. Also this is with building a debian package, using the -D option.

1
  • Using 1.6.2 I can't seem to get the >= to be working, = is fine. Feb 12, 2016 at 10:12

4 Answers 4

27

After reading Aleks-Daniel Jakimenko-A.'s answer, Reallumpi's one and doing some tests on a real life case, here is what you should do:

  1. use , (comma) without spaces to separate required packages ;
  2. escape ( and ) parenthesis when specifying package's version ;
  3. escape > (greater sign) when specifying package's version ;

Example

make && sudo -k checkinstall \
    --pkgsource="https://github.com/raboof/nethogs/" \
    --pkglicense="GPL2" \
    --deldesc=no \
    --nodoc \
    --maintainer="$USER\\<$USER@$HOSTNAME\\>" \
    --pkgarch=$(dpkg \
    --print-architecture) \
    --pkgversion="0.8.1" \
    --pkgrelease="SNAPSHOT" \
    --pkgname=nethogs \
    --requires="libc6 \(\>= 2.4\),libgcc1 \(\>= 1:4.1.1\),libncurses5 \(\>= 5.5-5~\),libpcap0.8 \(\>= 0.9.8\),libstdc++6 \(\>= 4.1.1\),libtinfo5" \
    make install

Output

*****************************************
**** Debian package creation selected ***
*****************************************

This package will be built according to these values:

0 -  Maintainer: [ elopez<elopez@> ]
1 -  Summary: [ Net top tool grouping bandwidth per process ]
2 -  Name:    [ nethogs ]
3 -  Version: [ 0.8.1 ]
4 -  Release: [ SNAPSHOT ]
5 -  License: [ GPL2 ]
6 -  Group:   [ checkinstall ]
7 -  Architecture: [ amd64 ]
8 -  Source location: [ https://github.com/raboof/nethogs/ ]
9 -  Alternate source location: [  ]
10 - Requires: [ libc6 (>= 2.4),libgcc1 (>= 1:4.1.1),libncurses5 (>= 5.5-5~),libpcap0.8 (>= 0.9.8),libstdc++6 (>= 4.1.1),libtinfo5 ]
11 - Provides: [ nethogs ]
12 - Conflicts: [  ]
13 - Replaces: [  ]
12

checkinstall uses , to separate multiple packages. That's it, a comma, without any spaces around it.

1
  • 1
    Yep, that solved my issue with multiple dependencies, but I still am unable to specify the minimum version for those dependencies via the --requires option. Aug 21, 2013 at 19:21
7

You need to escape brackets, e.g. --requires "package \(= 1.0\)"

1

This answer elaborates on how to properly format punctuation, within a shell script, to get multiple package dependencies for checkinstall to work.

PAK_USER='. , ? ! : + - ^ _ { } = $ % @ [ ] / ; # & * ~ ( ) < > \ |'
PAK_NEEDS='. , ? ! : + - ^ _ { } = $ % @ [ ] / ; # & * ~ ( ) < > \ |'
PAK_NEEDS=$(echo "$PAK_NEEDS" | perl -pe 's/([[:punct:]])/\\\1/g')

0 -  Maintainer: [ . , ? ! : + - ^ _ { } = $ % @ [ ] / ]
1 -  Summary: [ This is a punctuation escape test. ]
10 - Requires: [ . , ? ! : + - ^ _ { } = $ % @ [ ] / ; # & * ~ ( ) < > \ | ]

The ones that needs escaping appear to be shell operators ; # & * ~ ( ) < > \ | Some will return a value * ~ terminate the line ; # or wipe everything out ( ) < > | & while \ disappears since it's the escape character.

The regex perl -pe 's/([[:punct:]])/\\\1/g' escapes all the punctuation characters which is overkill but works quite well. Single and Double Quotes are already problematic, along with $, which will expand unless surrounded by single-quotes.

If you don't want to think about escaping, use the regex and caution with ' " $.

PAK_NEEDS="libasound2 (>= 1.0.16), libavcodec57 (>= 7:3.4.2) | libavcodec-extra57 (>= 7:3.4.2), libavformat57 (>= 7:3.4.2), libavutil55 (>= 7:3.4.2), libboost-filesystem1.65.1, libboost-system1.65.1, libc6 (>= 2.27), libcurl4 (>= 7.16.2), libexpat1 (>= 2.0.1), libgcc1 (>= 1:3.0), libgl1, libglu1-mesa | libglu1, libmad0 (>= 0.15.1b-3), libsdl2-2.0-0 (>= 2.0.8), libsdl2-image-2.0-0 (>= 2.0.2), libsdl2-net-2.0-0 (>= 2.0.1), libsdl2-ttf-2.0-0 (>= 2.0.14), libsndfile1 (>= 1.0.20), libspeex1 (>= 1.2~beta3-1), libspeexdsp1 (>= 1.2~beta3.2-1), libstdc++6 (>= 5.2), libswscale4 (>= 7:3.4.2), libvorbisfile3 (>= 1.1.2), libzzip-0-13 (>= 0.13.56), zlib1g (>= 1:1.1.4)"
PAK_NEEDS=$(echo "$PAK_NEEDS" | perl -pe 's/([[:punct:]])/\\\1/g')
10 - Requires: [ libasound2 (>= 1.0.16), libavcodec57 (>= 7:3.4.2) | libavcodec-extra57 (>= 7:3.4.2), libavformat57 (>= 7:3.4.2), libavutil55 (>= 7:3.4.2), libboost-filesystem1.65.1, libboost-system1.65.1, libc6 (>= 2.27), libcurl4 (>= 7.16.2), libexpat1 (>= 2.0.1), libgcc1 (>= 1:3.0), libgl1, libglu1-mesa | libglu1, libmad0 (>= 0.15.1b-3), libsdl2-2.0-0 (>= 2.0.8), libsdl2-image-2.0-0 (>= 2.0.2), libsdl2-net-2.0-0 (>= 2.0.1), libsdl2-ttf-2.0-0 (>= 2.0.14), libsndfile1 (>= 1.0.20), libspeex1 (>= 1.2~beta3-1), libspeexdsp1 (>= 1.2~beta3.2-1), libstdc++6 (>= 5.2), libswscale4 (>= 7:3.4.2), libvorbisfile3 (>= 1.1.2), libzzip-0-13 (>= 0.13.56), zlib1g (>= 1:1.1.4) ]

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