8

Is there an easy way to force compilers to show me the type deduced for a template parameter? For example, given

template<typename T>
void f(T&& parameter);

const volatile int * const pInt = nullptr;
f(pInt);

I might want to see what type is deduced for T in the call to f. (I think it's const volatile int *&, but I'm not sure.) Or given

template<typename T>
void f(T parameter);

int numbers[] = { 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 };
f(numbers);

I might want to find out if my guess that T is deduced to be int* in the call to f is correct.

If there's a third-party library solution (e.g., from Boost), I'd be interested to know about it, but I'd also like to know if there's an easy way to force a compilation diagnostic that would include the deduced type.

  • 5
    you want this during compilation, or at runtime? the latter can be done with #include <typeinfo> and typeid(T).name() – TemplateRex Aug 21 '13 at 23:15
  • std::is_same<T, const volatile int*&>::value? – Rapptz Aug 21 '13 at 23:24
  • @TemplateRex: I'd like to see the type during compilation. – KnowItAllWannabe Aug 21 '13 at 23:26
  • @Rapptz: In general, I want to see what type the compiler has deduced, not guess what it's deduced and then see if my guess is correct. – KnowItAllWannabe Aug 21 '13 at 23:27
  • 1
    @KnowItAllWannabe Not possible without run-time type information. – Rapptz Aug 21 '13 at 23:30
11

Link time solution:

On my platform (OS X), I can get the linker to give me this information by simply making a short program that is complete, minus the definition of the function I'm curious about:

template<typename T>
void f(T&& parameter);  // purposefully not defined

int
main()
{
    const volatile int * const pInt = nullptr;
    f(pInt);
}

Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64:
  "void f<int const volatile* const&>(int const volatile* const&&&)", referenced from:
      _main in test-9ncEvm.o
ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64
clang: error: linker command failed with exit code 1 (use -v to see invocation)

Admittedly I get the "triple reference", which should be interpreted as an lvalue reference (due to reference collapsing), and is a demangling bug (perhaps I can get that fixed).


Run time solution:

I keep a type_name<T>() function handy for this type of thing. A completely portable one is possible, but sub-optimal for me. Here it is:

#include <type_traits>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <string>

template <typename T>
std::string
type_name()
{
    typedef typename std::remove_reference<T>::type TR;
    std::string r = typeid(TR).name();
    if (std::is_const<TR>::value)
        r += " const";
    if (std::is_volatile<TR>::value)
        r += " volatile";
    if (std::is_lvalue_reference<T>::value)
        r += "&";
    else if (std::is_rvalue_reference<T>::value)
        r += "&&";
    return r;
}

I can use it like:

#include <iostream>

template<typename T>
void f(T&& parameter)
{
    std::cout << type_name<T>() << '\n';
}

int
main()
{
    const volatile int * const pInt = nullptr;
    f(pInt);
}

which for me prints out:

PVKi const&

That's not terribly friendly output. Your experience may be better. My platform ABI is based on the Itanium ABI. And this ABI includes this function:

namespace abi
{
    extern "C"
    char*
    __cxa_demangle(const char* mangled_name, char* buf, size_t* n, int* status);
}

I can use this to demangle C++ symbols into a human readable form. An updated type_name<T>() to take advantage of this is:

#include <type_traits>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <string>
#include <memory>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cxxabi.h>

template <typename T>
std::string
type_name()
{
    typedef typename std::remove_reference<T>::type TR;
    std::unique_ptr<char, void(*)(void*)> own
        (
            abi::__cxa_demangle(typeid(TR).name(), nullptr, nullptr, nullptr),
            std::free
        );
    std::string r = own != nullptr ? own.get() : typeid(TR).name();
    if (std::is_const<TR>::value)
        r += " const";
    if (std::is_volatile<TR>::value)
        r += " volatile";
    if (std::is_lvalue_reference<T>::value)
        r += "&";
    else if (std::is_rvalue_reference<T>::value)
        r += "&&";
    return r;
}

And now the previous main() prints out:

int const volatile* const&
  • This is useful, thanks. I've also since found that similar information is available via __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ under gcc and clang and under __FUNCSIG__ under MSVC. These produce strings, so they lead to runtime solutions. – KnowItAllWannabe Aug 22 '13 at 0:26
  • @KnowItAllWannabe unless you use it in e.g. static_assert – sehe Aug 22 '13 at 0:33
  • @sehe: Alas, __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ acts like a variable, not a string literal, so it can't be used inside static_assert. – KnowItAllWannabe Aug 22 '13 at 1:46
  • @HowardHinnant I believe this can be solved at compile time. I would greatly appreciate if you provided feedback on my answer. I am not an expert and maybe missed some important point or some corner cases. Many thanks! – Ali Sep 8 '13 at 11:32
  • @HowardHinnant On gcc 4.7.2 at least, if you pass nullptr as fourth argument to abi::__cxa_demangle(), it doesn't demangle the name anymore. Please consider passing a pointer to a local int variable even if you later ignore the error code. In this context, I would greatly appreciate your feedback on my previous answer. – Ali Sep 8 '13 at 15:46
7

I have tried the followings with g++ 4.7.2 and clang++ 3.4 (trunk 184647); they both give

a compile-time error and the error message is containing the deduced type.

I have no access to MSVC 12, please check what happens and provide feedback.

#include <string>

template <typename T>
struct deduced_type;


template<typename T>
void f(T&& ) {

    deduced_type<T>::show;
}

int main() {

    f(std::string()); // rvalue string

    std::string lvalue;

    f(lvalue);

    const volatile int * const pInt = nullptr;

    f(pInt);
}

The error messages: g++ 4.7.2

error: incomplete type deduced_type<std::basic_string<char> > used in nested name specifier
error: incomplete type deduced_type<std::basic_string<char>&> used in nested name specifier
error: incomplete type deduced_type<const volatile int* const&> used in nested name specifier

and clang++

error: implicit instantiation of undefined template deduced_type<std::basic_string<char> >
error: implicit instantiation of undefined template deduced_type<std::basic_string<char> &>
error: implicit instantiation of undefined template deduced_type<const volatile int *const &>

The note / info messages also contain the type of f with both compilers, for example

In instantiation of void f(T&&) [with T = std::basic_string<char>]

It's butt-ugly but works.

  • +1 Yes, I agree. This works too. – Howard Hinnant Sep 8 '13 at 15:29
  • @HowardHinnant Thanks for checking. (I have upvoted your answer 3 hours ago.) – Ali Sep 8 '13 at 15:31
2

To get the compiler to show you the type of a variable (perhaps in a round about way);

T parameter;
....
void f(int x);
...
f(parameter);

compiler should complain that "T" cannot be converted to int, assuming that it actually can't.

  • This is an interesting idea, but, at least with gcc 4.8.1 and MSVC 12, it has shortcomings. In the first example, gcc reports the type twice, once as const volatile int * const &&& (yes, with three ampersands!), once as const volatile int * const. MSVC also reports the type twice, once as volatile const int *const, once as volatile const int *const &. – KnowItAllWannabe Aug 21 '13 at 23:38
0

A slightly more succinct way to trigger the compiler diagnostic from Ali's answer is with a deleted function.

template <typename T>
f(T&&) = delete;

int main() {
    const volatile int * const pInt = nullptr;
    f(pInt);
    return 0;
}

With GCC 8.1.0, you get:

error: use of deleted function 'void f(T&&) [with T = const volatile int* const&]

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