4

I have a very simple piece of code in Haskell and Scala. This code is intended to run in a very tight loop so performance matters. The problem is that Haskell is about 10x slower than Scala. Here it is Haskell code.

{-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns #-}
import qualified Data.Vector.Unboxed as VU

newtype AffineTransform = AffineTransform {get :: (VU.Vector Double)} deriving (Show)

{-# INLINE runAffineTransform #-}
runAffineTransform :: AffineTransform -> (Double, Double) -> (Double, Double)
runAffineTransform affTr (!x, !y) = (get affTr `VU.unsafeIndex` 0 * x + get affTr `VU.unsafeIndex` 1 * y + get affTr `VU.unsafeIndex` 2, 
                                      get affTr `VU.unsafeIndex` 3 * x + get affTr `VU.unsafeIndex` 4 * y + get affTr `VU.unsafeIndex` 5)

testAffineTransformSpeed :: AffineTransform -> Int -> (Double, Double)
testAffineTransformSpeed affTr count = go count (0.5, 0.5)
  where go :: Int -> (Double, Double) -> (Double, Double)
        go 0 res = res
        go !n !res = go (n-1) (runAffineTransform affTr res)

What more can be done to improve this code?

  • How did you compile it, and with which compiler? – Don Stewart Aug 22 '13 at 7:44
  • It was compiled with ghc 7.6.3. The options are "-O2 -Wall -funbox-strict-fields -threaded -rtsopts". I expected -funbox-strict-fields is sufficient, but it was not the case. Well, i'm a complete newbie, so my expectations may be a little off. – Aurimas Aug 22 '13 at 8:13
  • 1
    Why do you need Vectors to represent affine transform? It seems more reasonable to make an ADT for it, and process arrays of coordinates. – leventov Aug 22 '13 at 9:52
  • 1
    You can make affine transform ADT an instance of fixed-vector (hackage.haskell.org/package/fixed-vector) and get all the power of vector operations as well. What do you mean by "separate coordinates"? Finally, is there more coordinates or transforms in your application? – leventov Aug 22 '13 at 11:38
  • 1
    Your code is much more awkward. Using array for fixed sized structure is not natural in any language, from C to Haskell. – leventov Aug 22 '13 at 12:32
8

The main problem is that

runAffineTransform affTr (!x, !y) = (get affTr `VU.unsafeIndex` 0 * x
                                     + get affTr `VU.unsafeIndex` 1 * y
                                     + get affTr `VU.unsafeIndex` 2, 
                                       get affTr `VU.unsafeIndex` 3 * x
                                     + get affTr `VU.unsafeIndex` 4 * y
                                     + get affTr `VU.unsafeIndex` 5)

produces a pair of thunks. The components are not evaluated when runAffineTransform is called, they remain thunks until some consumer demands them to be evaluated.

testAffineTransformSpeed affTr count = go count (0.5, 0.5)
  where go :: Int -> (Double, Double) -> (Double, Double)
        go 0 res = res
        go !n !res = go (n-1) (runAffineTransform affTr res)

is not that consumer, the bang on res only evaluates it to the outermost constructor, (,), and you get a result of

runAffineTransform affTr (runAffineTrasform affTr (runAffineTransform affTr (...)))

which is evaluated only at the end, when finally the normal form is demanded.

If you force the components of the result to be evaluated immediately,

runAffineTransform affTr (!x, !y) = case
  (  get affTr `U.unsafeIndex` 0 * x
   + get affTr `U.unsafeIndex` 1 * y
   + get affTr `U.unsafeIndex` 2
  ,  get affTr `U.unsafeIndex` 3 * x
   + get affTr `U.unsafeIndex` 4 * y
   + get affTr `U.unsafeIndex` 5
  ) of (!a,!b) -> (a,b)

and let it be inlined, the main difference to jtobin's version using a custom strict pair of unboxed Double#s is that for the loop in testAffineTransformSpeed you get one initial iteration using the boxed Doubles as argument, and at the end, the components of the result are boxed, which adds a bit of constant overhead (something around 5 nanoseconds per loop on my box). The main part of the loop takes an Int# and two Double# arguments in both cases and the loop body is identical except for the boxing when n = 0 is reached.

Of course, forcing the immediate evaluation of the components by using an unboxed strict pair type is nicer.

  • When is !(!x,!y) ever useful? – is7s Aug 22 '13 at 14:30
  • In a let or where binding. But here it's just a remnant of deleting one character too few from !res@(!x,!y). Thanks for noticing. – Daniel Fischer Aug 22 '13 at 14:33
9

I defined the following strict/unboxed pair type:

import System.Random.MWC -- for later
import Control.DeepSeq

data SP = SP {
    one :: {-# UNPACK #-} !Double
  , two :: {-# UNPACK #-} !Double
  } deriving Show

instance NFData SP where
  rnf p = rnf (one p) `seq` rnf (two p) `seq` ()

and replaced it in the runAffineTransform function:

runAffineTransform2 :: AffineTransform -> SP -> SP
runAffineTransform2 affTr !(SP x y) =
  SP (  get affTr `U.unsafeIndex` 0 * x
      + get affTr `U.unsafeIndex` 1 * y
      + get affTr `U.unsafeIndex` 2     )

     (  get affTr `U.unsafeIndex` 3 * x
      + get affTr `U.unsafeIndex` 4 * y
      + get affTr `U.unsafeIndex` 5     )
{-# INLINE runAffineTransform2 #-}

then ran this benchmark suite:

main :: IO ()
main = do
  g  <- create
  zs <- fmap (AffineTransform . U.fromList)
             (replicateM 100000 (uniformR (0 :: Double, 1) g))

  let myConfig = defaultConfig { cfgPerformGC = ljust True }

  defaultMainWith myConfig (return ()) [
      bench "yours" $ nf (testAffineTransformSpeed  zs) 10
    , bench "mine"  $ nf (testAffineTransformSpeed2 zs) 10
    ]

Compiled with -O2 and ran, and observed some (~4x) speedup:

benchmarking yours
mean: 257.4559 ns, lb 256.2492 ns, ub 258.9761 ns, ci 0.950
std dev: 6.889905 ns, lb 5.688330 ns, ub 8.839753 ns, ci 0.950
found 5 outliers among 100 samples (5.0%)
  3 (3.0%) high mild
  2 (2.0%) high severe
variance introduced by outliers: 20.944%
variance is moderately inflated by outliers

benchmarking mine
mean: 69.56408 ns, lb 69.29910 ns, ub 69.86838 ns, ci 0.950
std dev: 1.448874 ns, lb 1.261444 ns, ub 1.718074 ns, ci 0.950
found 4 outliers among 100 samples (4.0%)
  4 (4.0%) high mild
variance introduced by outliers: 14.190%
variance is moderately inflated by outliers

Full code is in a gist here.

EDIT

I also posted criterion's output report here.

  • 1
    Nice, now on my computer it very slightly outperforms Scala (Java). And what is the lesson to be learned? Strictness annotations are not enough (they do not unbox automatically?)? Sometimes you must manually create unboxed (unpacked) data structure? – Aurimas Aug 22 '13 at 4:53
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    @user2705843 Slides (4) and (9) are relevant here: johantibell.com/files/haskell-performance-patterns.html – jtobin Aug 22 '13 at 4:59
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    That NFData instance for SP is totally wasting work. And quite a lot of it, in fact. It implicitly creates Double constructors to point to the unpacked values in the SP, forces them, and then throws them away. rnf a = seq a () would be far more efficient and correct. – Carl Aug 22 '13 at 5:55
  • @Carl Thanks. Making that change doesn't make any (time) difference here, though. – jtobin Aug 22 '13 at 7:40
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    @Carl You're underestimating GHC, case p_aIf of _ { AffTran.SP _ _ -> GHC.Tuple.() } is what it produces for the NFData instance. It knows the components are unboxed and sees no reason to evaluate them once again. – Daniel Fischer Aug 22 '13 at 12:24

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