423

Is there a benefit to using one over the other? In Python 2, they both seem to return the same results:

>>> 6/3
2
>>> 6//3
2

14 Answers 14

585

In Python 3.0, 5 / 2 will return 2.5 and 5 // 2 will return 2. The former is floating point division, and the latter is floor division, sometimes also called integer division.

In Python 2.2 or later in the 2.x line, there is no difference for integers unless you perform a from __future__ import division, which causes Python 2.x to adopt the behavior of 3.0

Regardless of the future import, 5.0 // 2 will return 2.0 since that's the floor division result of the operation.

You can find a detailed description at https://docs.python.org/whatsnew/2.2.html#pep-238-changing-the-division-operator

  • edited: You can "fix" division since Python 2.2! (Just read the linked PEP) – u0b34a0f6ae Nov 9 '09 at 23:51
  • 2
    also python -Qnew. other division options: -Qold (default), -Qwarn, -Qwarnall – John La Rooy Nov 10 '09 at 0:13
  • 2
    Worth pointing out that 5.0 / 2 returns 2.5 in all versions, as does 5 / 2.0 - the old behaviour is only different when both operands are int. – Chris Aug 17 '16 at 15:45
  • 2
    What about when the numbers are negative? Is the behavior the same for negative integers? – Aaron Franke Mar 30 '18 at 4:17
  • 1
    @Srinivasu Your example isn't helpful. Better would be 5 // 2 (which yields 2) and -5 // 2 (which yields -3). – Marvin Jan 25 at 4:36
64

It helps to clarify for the Python 2.x line, / is neither floor division nor true division. The current accepted answer is not clear on this. / is floor division when both args are int, but is true division when either or both of the args are float.

The above tells a lot more truth, and is a lot more clearer than the 2nd paragraph in the accepted answer.

30

// implements "floor division", regardless of your type. So 1.0/2.0 will give 0.5, but both 1/2, 1//2 and 1.0//2.0 will give 0.

See https://docs.python.org/whatsnew/2.2.html#pep-238-changing-the-division-operator for details

  • This is a good answer. The PEP link is helpful. Also, consider using math.floor() or math.fmod() if you're not sure what's going on with the unary operators . – Scott Lowrey Apr 15 '15 at 16:29
  • / and // are bi-nary operators (two operands, left and right, numerator and denominator) – iono Jul 30 at 12:00
28

/ --> Floating point division

// --> Floor division

Lets see some examples in both python 2.7 and in Python 3.5.

Python 2.7.10 vs. Python 3.5

print (2/3)  ----> 0                   Python 2.7
print (2/3)  ----> 0.6666666666666666  Python 3.5

Python 2.7.10 vs. Python 3.5

  print (4/2)  ----> 2         Python 2.7
  print (4/2)  ----> 2.0       Python 3.5

Now if you want to have (in python 2.7) same output as in python 3.5, you can do the following:

Python 2.7.10

from __future__ import division
print (2/3)  ----> 0.6666666666666666   #Python 2.7
print (4/2)  ----> 2.0                  #Python 2.7

Where as there is no differece between Floor division in both python 2.7 and in Python 3.5

138.93//3 ---> 46.0        #Python 2.7
138.93//3 ---> 46.0        #Python 3.5
4//3      ---> 1           #Python 2.7
4//3      ---> 1           #Python 3.5
  • is this the same as int(5/2)? – PirateApp Mar 20 '18 at 10:52
  • What about when the numbers are negative? Is the behavior the same for negative integers? – Aaron Franke Mar 30 '18 at 4:18
  • Re: Negatives -- Behavior is the same, but remember that the result is floor, so rounding is always down towards more negative. Some examples: -100 // 33 => -4; 100 // -33 => -4; but because of the rounding direction of floor func, the next one could seem counter-intuitive when compared to previous: -100 // -33 => 3. – Erdős-Bacon Aug 5 at 19:36
21

As everyone has already answered, // is floor division.

Why this is important is that // is unambiguously floor division, in all Python versions from 2.2, including Python 3.x versions.

The behavior of / can change depending on:

  • Active __future__ import or not (module-local)
  • Python command line option, either -Q old or -Q new
10
>>> print 5.0 / 2
2.5

>>> print 5.0 // 2
2.0
  • 1
    Hadn't realized that floor division works with non-integers, too. Thanks! – Mike Nov 24 '14 at 21:00
5

Python 2.7 and other upcoming version of python:

  • Division (/)

Divides left hand operand by right hand operand

Example: 4 / 2 = 2

  • Floor Division (//)

The division of operands where the result is the quotient in which the digits after the decimal point are removed. But if one of the operands is negative, the result is floored, i.e., rounded away from zero (towards negative infinity):

Examples: 9//2 = 4 and 9.0//2.0 = 4.0, -11//3 = -4, -11.0//3 = -4.0

Both / Division and // floor division operator are operating in similar fashion.

  • 2
    Towards infinity and away from zero are different things. Example for (-1.2 and 3.4): "flooring" is towards negative infinity (-2 and 3), "truncating" is towards zero (-1 and 3), "saturating" is away from zero (-2 and 4), and "ceiling" is towards positive infinity (-1 and 4). – Phernost Apr 19 '17 at 8:38
4

The double slash, //, is floor division:

>>> 7//3
2
3

In this answer I will not only tell the answer, but also the benefits of //.

Most of you, who use Python must be knowing about the floor division operator(//) in Python. For those who don't know, this operator returns the floor value after division. For Example : 5 / 2 = 2.5, but 5 // 2 = 2 (2 is the floor value of 2.5)

But the division operator behaves abnormally generally for numbers greater than 10 ^ 17.

x = 10000000000000000000006
if x / 2 == x // 2:
    print("Hello")
else:
    print("World")

For the above code, World will be printed and not Hello. This is because 10000000000000000000006 / 2 will return 5e + 21, but 10000000000000000000006 // 2 will return the correct answer 5000000000000000000003. Even int(10000000000000000000006 / 2) will return 5000000000000000000000, which is incorrect.

Therefore even if you want to divide large numbers, use // operator.

For Example : If you want to find sum of first 100000000000000000000000010002 numbers, with formula : n(n + 1)/2, the normal division operator(/) will give you incorrect answer, but // operator will give you correct answer.

  • +1 for the additional detail for larger numbers. So when we want floor division for very large numbers, we use '//' operator for accurate results. What if we want floating point division with very larger numbers, can we safely use '/' operator? – Raja Dorji Jul 1 at 13:29
  • It's not that / is "behaving abnormally" here - this is just floating point error. / in Python 3 returns a float, even when dividing integers, and 5000000000000000000003 cannot be exactly represented as a float. – Mark Amery Jul 4 at 22:25
2

// is floor division, it will always give you the integer floor of the result. The other is 'regular' division.

2

The answer of the equation is rounded to the next smaller integer or float with .0 as decimal point.

>>>print 5//2
2
>>> print 5.0//2
2.0
>>>print 5//2.0
2.0
>>>print 5.0//2.0
2.0
2

The above answers are good. I want to add another point. Up to some values both of them result in the same quotient. After that floor division operator (//) works fine but not division (/) operator.

 - > int(755349677599789174/2)
 - > 377674838799894592      #wrong answer
 - > 755349677599789174 //2
 - > 377674838799894587      #correct answer
1
  • // is floor division, it will always give you the floor value of the result.
  • And the other one / is the floating-point division.

Followings are the difference between / and //; I have run these arithmetic operations in Python 3.7.2

>>> print (11 / 3)
3.6666666666666665

>>> print (11 // 3)
3

>>> print (11.3 / 3)
3.7666666666666667

>>> print (11.3 // 3)
3.0
  • 2
    How does this answer add anything that the other ideas do not cover? Or how is this answer better in any way than the other answers? – Rory Daulton Mar 23 at 19:27
  • 2
    The following is the output of a program. It explains nothing. – user207421 Jun 6 at 4:36
-1

5.0//2 results in 2.0, and not 2 because the return type of the return value from // operator follows python coercion (type casting) rules.

Python promotes conversion of lower datatype (integer) to higher data type (float) to avoid data loss.

protected by Sheldore Jul 14 at 13:01

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