Reading through the various tutorial on the web, I came across a two different ways of registering a controller.

var app = angular.module('myApp', []);

//without explicit dependency injection
app.controller ("myCtrl1", function ($scope, $http) {
       //some implementation
});

//with explicit dependency injection
app.controller ("myCtrl2", ["$scope", "$http", function ($scope, $http) {
       //some implementation
}]);

Both seems to work equality with both $scope and $http object being available to use inside the function.

Can someone enlighten me as to the different between the two approach and if one is preferred over the other? If angular can figure out the right dependencies to be injected, what is the benefit of declaring it explicitly?

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The issue is minification:

//without explicit dependency injection
a.controller ("myCtrl1", function (b, c) {
       // Broken because toString here returns
       // a, b - which are not dependencies that
       // Angular knows how to resolve
});

//with explicit dependency injection
a.controller ("myCtrl2", ["$scope", "$http", function (b, c) {
       // b and c are properly resolved
}]);
  • I have a feeling there's more to this story. Since the implicit form seems to be so ubiquitous in examples around the 'net, and generated code from yeoman, and since everybody minifies their Javascript - is there another way around this problem? – skagedal Mar 27 '15 at 16:51
  • Ah, yes. People use tools to add the explicit dependencies. For example, the Grunt task grunt-ng-annotate is used in a Yeoman scaffolded Angular project. github.com/mzgol/grunt-ng-annotate – skagedal Mar 27 '15 at 16:58

the main difference is that, with explicit dependency injection, your dependencies are not found based on the arguments names but on the strings you pass. This allows you to use javascript minifiers without risk, because they would rename the arguments.

  • thank you, II just faced a problem when use webpack with uglifyjs – Allen Jun 4 '17 at 8:16

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