11

I'd like to add some characters to the beginning of each line.

How could I do ?

I was doing that:

'\n\t\t\t'.join(myStr.splitlines())

But it isn't perfect and I'd like to know if there are better ways to do that. I originally want to indent a whole block of text automatically.

14

I think that's a pretty nice method. One thing you could improve is that your method introduces a leading newline, and removes any trailing newline. This won't:

'\t\t\t'.join(myStr.splitlines(True))

From the docs:

str.splitlines([keepends])

Return a list of the lines in the string, breaking at line boundaries. This method uses the universal newlines approach to splitting lines. Line breaks are not included in the resulting list unless keepends is given and true.

Also, unless your string begins with a newline, you aren't adding any tabs at the beginning of the string, so you may want to do this too:

'\t\t\t'.join(('\n'+myStr.lstrip()).splitlines(True))
1

For flexible option, you may wish to have a look at textwrap in the standard library.

Example:

>>> hamlet='''\
... To be, or not to be: that is the question:
... Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
... The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
... Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
... And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
... No more; and by a sleep to say we end
... '''
>>> import textwrap
>>> wrapper=textwrap.TextWrapper(initial_indent='\t', subsequent_indent='\t'*2)
>>> print wrapper.fill(hamlet)
    To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the
        mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to
        take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To
        die: to sleep; No more; and by a sleep to say we end

You can see that you can not only easily add flexible space on the front of each line, you can trim each line to fit, hyphenate, expand tabs, etc.

It will wrap (hence the name) lines that become too long because of the additions on the front:

>>> wrapper=textwrap.TextWrapper(initial_indent='\t'*3, 
... subsequent_indent='\t'*4, width=40)
>>> print wrapper.fill(hamlet)
            To be, or not to be: that is the
                question: Whether 'tis nobler in the
                mind to suffer The slings and arrows
                of outrageous fortune, Or to take
                arms against a sea of troubles, And
                by opposing end them? To die: to
                sleep; No more; and by a sleep to
                say we end

Very flexible and useful.

Edit

If you wish to keep the meaning of line endings in the text with textwrap, just combine textwrap with splitlines to keep line endings the same.

Example of hanging indent:

import textwrap

hamlet='''\
Hamlet: In the secret parts of Fortune? O, most true! She is a strumpet. What's the news?
Rosencrantz: None, my lord, but that the world's grown honest.
Hamlet: Then is doomsday near.'''

wrapper=textwrap.TextWrapper(initial_indent='\t'*1, 
                             subsequent_indent='\t'*3, 
                             width=30)

for para in hamlet.splitlines():
    print wrapper.fill(para)
    print 

prints

Hamlet: In the secret parts
        of Fortune? O, most true!
        She is a strumpet. What's
        the news?

Rosencrantz: None, my lord,
        but that the world's grown
        honest.

Hamlet: Then is doomsday
        near.
  • Can we, perhaps, somehow, keep the new line type separator (\n, \r\n or \r, if I'm right) like str.splitlines(True) does? I'll have a closer look to this module but this looks neat! – JeromeJ Aug 22 '13 at 20:47
  • (… (2) or perhaps this is completely useless and I'd better use only "\n" everywhere?) – JeromeJ Aug 22 '13 at 21:16
  • @JeromeJ: Why do you say useless? It is not trivial at all what textwrap is doing. Think about word wrap in a word processor. If you add 3 tabs to the front of your lines, what happens when the line in too long to display in the given space? This library allows you to add space at the beginning of each line and wrap all the remaining lines if that space makes the line too wide. How is that useless? – dawg Aug 22 '13 at 21:28
  • Arh no, that's not what I meant, I was talking about my own comment (but I couldn't edit it anymore, it was too late): Perhaps wanting to keep the new line separator type is useless and I'd better only use "\n" for new lines (that was the second question). About the wrapping feature though, I don't need it (I guess it can be desactived), I only need to add stuff in front of it but I can see how powerful the module is (and even more if you care about wrapping long lines) – JeromeJ Aug 22 '13 at 21:51
  • Thanks for your edit but I'd add the True param to the str.splitlines function so it does keep the newline separator and I'd import print from the __future__ module (for those not using Python 3) so that you can specify the end keyword to be set to end="" so that Python's print doesn't automatically add its "\n" at the end. I would have modified your answer but I'm afraid my edit has been refused (don't really know why). – JeromeJ Aug 23 '13 at 16:30

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