35

This site's run a test between the 3 different methods and it seems .html is the fastest, followed by .append. followed by .innerHTML. Can someone explain to me the reasons why?

Here's the site which does the comparison among the three methods.

I have read this this SO question which is related but I don't really understand the given answer, and the question didn't really elaborate much regarding .innerHtml.

I don't understand the following part:

A temporary element is created, let's call it x. x's innerHTML is set to the string of HTML that you've passed. Then jQuery will transfer each of the produced nodes (that is, x's childNodes) over to a newly created document fragment, which it will then cache for next time. It will then return the fragment's childNodes as a fresh DOM collection. Note that it's actually a lot more complicated than that, as jQuery does a bunch of cross-browser checks and various other optimisations. E.g. if you pass just <div></div> to jQuery(), jQuery will take a shortcut and simply do document.createElement('div').

Can someone simplify this?

  • 3
    Go one revision back: jsperf.com/jquery-append-vs-html-list-performance/19 Revision 20 is simply broken by some nitwit. – BalusC Aug 23 '13 at 3:15
  • Your tests are flawed based on method of execution. Many times performance is only as good as algorithms and choice of implementation (eg var i=1; has the equivalent result of var i;for(var c=0,n=10000;c<n;c++){i=1;}, but the first is clearly more optimized and a better choice) – vol7ron Aug 23 '13 at 3:25
  • Here a working benchmark for the 4 different cases: jsben.ch/#/yDvKH – EscapeNetscape Oct 20 '16 at 13:01
43

That benchmark is worthless. innerHTML is always faster than DOM manipulation.

jQuery seems faster because it prepares a string with all the HTML first while the others do one operation each iteration. Also note that jQuery.html() uses innerHTML whenever it can.

jQuery from benchmark

var html = '';
for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
  html += '<div>Test ' + i + '</div>';
}

$('#list').html(html);

innerHTML from benchmark

var list = document.getElementById('list');
for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
  list.innerHTML = list.innerHTML + '<div>Test ' + i + '</div>';
}

The test for innerHTML would be a lot faster if it was written like:

var list = document.getElementById('list');
var html = '';

for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    html += '<div>Test ' + i + '</div>';
}

list.innerHTML = html;

http://jsben.ch/#/yDvKH

  • Please add style='display:none'. It looks better this way: jsperf.com/jquery-html-vs-innerhtml-the-better-way/2 – invisal Aug 23 '13 at 3:22
  • 2
    so the Javascript function more efficient than jQuery? – akbarbin Aug 23 '13 at 3:23
  • @invisal Fixed that :P – Bart Aug 23 '13 at 3:24
  • 2
    @MuhamadAkbarBinWidayat Yes. Native code is always faster. jQuery uses it itself. Besides innerHTML and DOM manipulation there is really not much left to manipulate a document. – Bart Aug 23 '13 at 3:26
  • 3
    To do a proper comparison you should keep everything identical except for the exact thing that you are comparing, which is not the case with many of the jsperf comparisons that I've seen. Here is a simple, more accurate performance comparison: jsperf.com/innerhtml-vs-html-vs-empty-append – thdoan May 5 '15 at 7:28
41

All three are slow to me. Modifying the dom on each iteration is slow.

http://jsperf.com/jquery-append-vs-html-list-performance/24

I just added a new test in there:

var html = [];
for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
  html.push('<div>Test ' + i + '</div>');
}

document.getElementById('list').innerHTML = html.join('');

This is much faster again. :)

My method in Firefox does 26k Ops/sec vs 1,000, 10,000, and 13

enter image description here

  • 2
    Yeah, saw the outcome. Never knew arrays where that fast. – Bart Aug 23 '13 at 3:28
  • 3
    @Bart - We had massive issues building a 50 column by 200 row table client-side using templating frameworks. I got the idea from destroyallsoftware.com/talks/wat to concat an entire table. We went from a 5-10 second render to instant with it. (IE 7 still takes about 2 seconds though) – Phill Aug 23 '13 at 3:30
  • 2
    That's impressive. That talk by the way was pretty hilarious :-D – Bart Aug 23 '13 at 3:38
11

How can .html be faster than .innerHTML when the .html is using .innerHTML with a lot of extra code? Here .html implementation in jQuery (taken directly from jQuery file).

html: function( value ) {
    return jQuery.access( this, function( value ) {
        var elem = this[0] || {},
            i = 0,
            l = this.length;

        if ( value === undefined ) {
            return elem.nodeType === 1 ?
                elem.innerHTML.replace( rinlinejQuery, "" ) :
                undefined;
        }

        // See if we can take a shortcut and just use innerHTML
        if ( typeof value === "string" && !rnoInnerhtml.test( value ) &&
            ( jQuery.support.htmlSerialize || !rnoshimcache.test( value )  ) &&
            ( jQuery.support.leadingWhitespace || !rleadingWhitespace.test( value ) ) &&
            !wrapMap[ ( rtagName.exec( value ) || ["", ""] )[1].toLowerCase() ] ) {

            value = value.replace( rxhtmlTag, "<$1></$2>" );

            try {
                for (; i < l; i++ ) {
                    // Remove element nodes and prevent memory leaks
                    elem = this[i] || {};
                    if ( elem.nodeType === 1 ) {
                        jQuery.cleanData( getAll( elem, false ) );
                        elem.innerHTML = value;
                    }
                }

                elem = 0;

            // If using innerHTML throws an exception, use the fallback method
            } catch(e) {}
        }

        if ( elem ) {
            this.empty().append( value );
        }
    }, null, value, arguments.length );
}
  • 1
    Funny how this answer actually asks a question with an explanation! :) – Lazar Ljubenović Sep 29 '18 at 13:26
2

I think the innerHTML is faster with suggesstion @Brat.

And on creating loop and appending string should be good on using variable first. It is make your performance more good.

good code:

var html = '';
for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
  html += '<div>Test ' + i + '</div>';
};
$('#list').append(html);

not efficient code:

for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
  var html = '<div>Test ' + i + '</div>';
  $('#list').append(html);
}

for example: http://jsben.ch/#/yDvKH

  • 1
    a much faster test that i tested on my end is to have an array outside the loop var html = [] and inside the loop use html.push("<td>...</td>") and once the loop ends, use element.innerHTML = html.join("") try running a test with this, its orders of magnitude faster – PirateApp Jan 4 '18 at 18:04
2

As Bart said, innerHTML is always faster than DOM manipulation.

I was testing hyperHTML, so I thought I share my results. I didn't actually run my benchmarks in CodePen originally, and there is an interesting difference in that the jQuery times are much closer to innerHTML running in CodePen.

Chrome:
createFragment 312.80 ms  
hyperHTML      253.10 ms     
innerHTML       62.70 ms   
$.append       183.40 ms

Chrome (extensions off): 
createFragment 225.10 ms 
hyperHTML      139.80 ms 
innerHTML       47.80 ms 
$.append       170.90 ms

Firefox: 
createFragment 141 ms 
hyperHTML       84 ms 
innerHTML       25 ms 
$.append        90 ms

Edge: 
createFragment 422.50 ms 
hyperHTML      184.60 ms 
innerHTML       44.00 ms 
$.append      1629.69 ms

IE11: 
createFragment   1180.29 ms 
hyperHTML       13315.59 ms //slow fallbacks, IE sucks 
innerHTML         125.70 ms 
$.append         2382.49 ms

I think it is all pretty simple. JavaScript is not as fast as the browser at parsing and creating elements, because the browser is machine specific compiled code. You can't do better than just handing over the HTML and letting the browser do the work without interruption.

It is possible that some of the performance differences are due to XSS checking, which would seem prudent.

function runbench(){
  var data = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < 10001; i++) {
      data.push("<span>" + i + "</span>");
  }

  var perf=[];
  var t0 = performance.now();
  var c = document.createDocumentFragment();
  for (var i = 0; i < 10001; i++) {
      var e = document.createElement("span");
      e.innerHTML = data[i];
      c.appendChild(e);
  }
  document.querySelector('#createFragment').appendChild(c);
  document.querySelector('#createFragment').classList='done';
  var t1 = performance.now();
  perf.push(t1-t0);

  var t0 = performance.now();
  document.querySelector('#innerHTML').innerHTML = data.join('');
  document.querySelector('#innerHTML').classList='done';
  var t1 = performance.now();
  perf.push(t1-t0);

  var t0 = performance.now();
  $('#jqhtml').html(data.join(''));
  document.querySelector('#jqhtml').classList='done';
  var t1 = performance.now();
  perf.push(t1-t0);

  var t0 = performance.now();
  $('#jqappend').append(data.join(''));
  document.querySelector('#jqappend').classList='done';
  var t1 = performance.now();
  perf.push(t1-t0);

  var t0 = performance.now();
  hyperHTML.bind(document.querySelector('#hyperHTML'))       
  `${data.map(function (item) {
      return "<span>" + item + "</span>";
  })}`;
  document.querySelector('#hyperHTML').classList='done';
  var t1 = performance.now();
  perf.push(t1-t0);

  var stats = [];
  stats.push("<table>")
  stats.push("<tr><td>createFrag: </td><td>" + perf[0].toFixed(2) + "</td></tr>");
  stats.push("<tr><td>innerHTML: </td><td>" + perf[1].toFixed(2) + "</td></tr>");
  stats.push("<tr><td>$.html: </td><td>" + perf[2] .toFixed(2) + "</td></tr>");
  stats.push("<tr><td>$.append: </td><td>" + perf[3] .toFixed(2) + "</td></tr>");
  stats.push("<tr><td>hyperHTML: </td><td>" + perf[4].toFixed(2) + "</td></tr>");
  stats.push("</table>");
  $('#performance').html(stats.join(''));
  document.querySelector('#performance').classList='done';
}

https://codepen.io/jwhooper/pen/GzKwMV

1

I also had a problem with big table redraw (about 10x100 size). It takes about 300ms to redraw whole table.

The reason was not in the jQuery.append() and not in dom.innerHTML, but in appending each element each time.

The fastest way is to concatenate all elements html code and then append it to DOM. Like this:

function redrawMyTable( myData )
{
    var innerHTML = '';
    for ( var i = 0; i < myData.length; i++ )
    {
      innerHTML += createRowFromData( myData[i] );
    }

    myTableTbody.innerHTML = innerHTML;
}
function createRowFromData( rowData )
{
    var rowHTML = '';
    for ( var i = 0; i < rowData.length; i++ )
    {
      rowHTML += createCellFromData( rowData[i] );
    }
    return rowHTML;
}
function createCellFromData( cellData )
{
    //Do everything you need, and return HTMl code as a string
    return cellHTML;
}

Now it takes only 20-30 ms (against 300ms :))

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