42

I'm a newbie to Java. Now I'm studying equals and == and redefinition of equals and toString.

I would like to use both the toString method that I have redefied and the default method that is inherited from the Object class.

I failed to use that super modificator to reach that method.

This is for educational purposes only. What I would like to get is more clear if you will have a look at the comments in my code.

Could you help me here?

My code is:

public class EqualTest{
    public static void main(String[] args){ 
        Employee alice1 = new Employee("Alice Adams", 75000, 1987, 12, 15);
            //System.out.super.println(alice1);

        Employee alice2 = alice1;
            //System.out.super.println(alice2);

        Employee alice3 = new Employee("Alice Adams", 75000, 1987, 12, 15);
            //System.out.super.println(alice3);

        System.out.println("alice1==alice2: " + (alice1==alice2));
        System.out.println("alice1 == alice3: " + (alice1==alice3));
        System.out.println("alice1.equals(alice3): " + alice1.equals(alice3));
    }
}

class Employee{
...
    public String toString(){
        return getClass().getName() + "[name = " + name + 
            ", salary=" + salary + ", hireDay=" + hireDay + "]";
    }

}
  • 6
    Firstly it's not called redefining it's called overriding – Aniket Thakur Aug 23 '13 at 7:12
  • 3
    But the default implementation does not return the adress of the object. It returns the class name and the hashCode of that object. From the documentation of java.lang.Object: 'getClass().getName() + '@' + Integer.toHexString(hashCode())' – Matthias Aug 23 '13 at 7:12
  • Well, yes. But the hash code is the address. Look at the documentation for Object hashCode: This is typically implemented by converting the internal address of the object into an integer, but this implementation technique is not required by the JavaTM programming language. So, the hash code is just the same hex number representing the address. But its converted into decimal. – Kifsif Aug 23 '13 at 7:22
  • 2
    Well, no. It can be the address, but there is no guaranteee. You were therefore never able to print the address reliably in the first place, regardless of whether or not you overrode toString(). But I don't see any requirement here to actually get the address at all, just the original result of toString(), which is available via super.toString(), despite your unspecified 'failure'. Your actual question remains unclear. – Marquis of Lorne Aug 23 '13 at 7:31
  • 3
    @Kifsif Saying It is the address is plain wrong. It may be the address (and in most cases, but not all, it probably is). Ie, if you rely on hashCode() for getting the address of objects it may work in some cases, but in other cases it may fail. Eg, it'd be possible according to the specs that some JVM keeps a completely random number as hashcode stored for each object. In reality, this probably wouldn't be the case, since it would entail unecessary storage overhead. Anyways, in Java you typically shouldn't be concerned with at what memory addresses objects are located. Java is not C. – Alderath Aug 23 '13 at 10:39
74

Strictly speaking, you can't print the address of an object in pure Java. The number that looks like an object address in the String produced by Object.toString() is the object's "identity hashcode". It may or may not be related to the object's current address:

  • The specs do not say how the identity hashcode number is calculated. It is deliberately left unspecified.

  • Since the number is a hashcode, it cannot change. So even though it is (typically) related to an object address, that will be the object's address at the time when the hashcode was first accessed. This could be different to its current address, and it will be different if the GC has moved the object since the first time the object's identity hashcode was observed.

  • On a 64bit JVM (with a large enough heap size / not using compressed oops) addresses won't fit into an identity hashcode number which is returned as an int.

Anyhow, the way to get this number is to call System.identityHashCode(obj).


If you really want an object's current address, you can get it using JNI and a native method (and some abstraction breaking), or by using methods in the Unsafe class. But beware that both of these approaches are non-portable ... and that the object addresses that they give you are liable to "break" when the GC runs.


For the doubters, this is what the Java 10 javadocs say on the "hashcode != address" point:

"(The hashCode may or may not be implemented as some function of an object's memory address at some point in time.)"

Emphasis added. Indeed, with recent JVMs, the default behavior is to NOT base the hashCode on a memory address at all. It has been that way since at least Java 7.

You can confirm this by including -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal to find out what the hashcode flag defaults to, and then looking at the OpenJDK source code to see what it means. (The code is in the "vm/runtime/synchronizer.cpp" file in some versions, but YMMV.)

| improve this answer | |
19

If you want to achieve sort-of default toString() behavior, you can make use of System.identityHashCode() method. Default toString() will then look like this:

public String toString(Object o) {
    return o.getClass().getName() + "@" + 
           Integer.toHexString(System.identityHashCode(o));
}
| improve this answer | |
1

You can call super() method to execute the corresponding superclass method.

class Employee{
...
    public String toString(){
         String s = super.toString();
        return getClass().getName() + "[name = " + name + 
            ", salary=" + salary + ", hireDay=" + hireDay + "]" + s;
    }

toString() in Object class is as follows

public String toString() {
    return getClass().getName() + "@" + Integer.toHexString(hashCode());
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Here is an in-depth answer about overriding equals and hashcode

What issues should be considered when overriding equals and hashCode in Java?

The key point being The relation between the two methods is:

Whenever a.equals(b), then a.hashCode() must be same as b.hashCode().

| improve this answer | |
0

You may create another method inside your Employee class to use super toString method.

See example:

public class Employee {
    public String toString() {
        return "MyToStringMethod";
    }

    public String superToString() {
        return super.toString();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Employee b = new Employee();
        System.out.println(b);
        System.out.println(b.superToString());
    }
}

or combine both in one method:

public class Employee {
    public String toString() {
        return super.toString() + " MyToStringMethod";
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Employee b = new Employee();
        System.out.println(b);
    }
}
| improve this answer | |

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