43

I'm trying to configure a UIPageViewController SPECIFICALLY from storyboard:

enter image description here

TutorialPageViewController.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
@interface TutorialPageViewController : UIPageViewController <UIPageViewControllerDelegate, UIPageViewControllerDataSource>
@end

TutorialPageViewController.m

#import "TutorialPageViewController.h"

@interface TutorialPageViewController ()
@property (assign, nonatomic) NSInteger index;
@end

@implementation TutorialPageViewController
{
    NSArray *myViewControllers;
}

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil
{
    self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil];
    if (self) {
        // Custom initialization
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    // Do any additional setup after loading the view.
    self.delegate = self;
    self.dataSource = self;
    [self didMoveToParentViewController:self];
    UIStoryboard *tutorialStoryboard = [UIStoryboard storyboardWithName:@"TutorialStoryboard" bundle:[NSBundle mainBundle]];
    UIViewController *tuto1 = [tutorialStoryboard instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier:@"TutorialPageViewController_1"];
    UIViewController *tuto2 = [tutorialStoryboard instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier:@"TutorialPageViewController_2"];

    myViewControllers = @[tuto1, tuto2, tuto1, tuto2];
    self.index = 0;

    [self setViewControllers:@[tuto1] direction:UIPageViewControllerNavigationDirectionForward animated:NO completion:nil];
}

- (UIViewController *)viewControllerAtIndex:(NSUInteger)index {
    return myViewControllers[index];
}

- (UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController viewControllerBeforeViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController {

    NSUInteger index = self.index;

    if (index == 0) { return nil; }

    // Decrease the index by 1 to return
    index--;
    return [self viewControllerAtIndex:index];
}

- (UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController viewControllerAfterViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController {

    NSUInteger index = self.index;
    index++;
    if (index > [myViewControllers count]) { return nil; }

    return [self viewControllerAtIndex:index];
}

- (NSInteger)presentationCountForPageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController {
    // The number of items reflected in the page indicator.
    return [myViewControllers count];
}

- (NSInteger)presentationIndexForPageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController {
    // The selected item reflected in the page indicator.
    return 0;
}

@end

Problem is...

  • The first page displays well with the page indicator. While swiping,
  • I can see properly the second page.
  • As soon as the transition finishes, I get a black screen (with the page indicator properly displaying page number 2). No user interaction is available anymore.
  • This is the first time I've seen the UIPageViewController itself used for it's own datasource and delegate. Seems logical but every tutorial I've seen doesn't go this route. Hopefully you go tit working. – Travis M. Aug 7 '14 at 20:00
  • 1
    @BenjaminToueg, I'm pretty sure "didMoveToParentViewController" is unnecessary here. – Fattie Sep 24 '14 at 19:10
  • This older question is essentially easy, if you're comfortable with container views - tutorial – Fattie May 30 '17 at 12:56
  • 1
    hey @BenjaminToueg - can you tick an answer here after all these years buddy? :) – Fattie Apr 19 '18 at 19:07
62

2017 answer..

Nowadays it is dead easy to do this simply using Storyboard.

These sort of "swiping full-screen tutorials" were popular as app "intros" for awhile, so I called the class below IntroPages.

Step 1, make a container view that is a UIPageViewController.

If new to iOS, here is a container view tutorial.

( Note: if you don't know how to change the container view to a UIPageViewController, scroll down to the section "How to change..." on that tutorial.

enter image description here )

You can make the container any shape you want. As with any container view, it can be full-screen or a small part of the screen - whatever you want.

Step 2,

Make four straightforward view controllers which can be anything you want - images, text, tables, anything at all. (Purple in the example.)

four controllers

Note that they simply sit there on your storyboard, do not link them to anything.

Step 3, you must Set the IDs of those four pages. "id1", "id2", "id4", "id4" is fine.

set the IDs

Step 4, copy and paste! Here's the class IntroPages,

class IntroPages: UIPageViewController, UIPageViewControllerDataSource, UIPageViewControllerDelegate {

    var pages = [UIViewController]()

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        self.delegate = self
        self.dataSource = self

        let p1: UIViewController! = storyboard?.instantiateViewController(withIdentifier: "id1")
        let p2: UIViewController! = storyboard?.instantiateViewController(withIdentifier: "id2")
        let p3: UIViewController! = storyboard?.instantiateViewController(withIdentifier: "id3")

        // etc ...

        pages.append(p1)
        pages.append(p2)
        pages.append(p3)

        // etc ...

        setViewControllers([p1], direction: UIPageViewControllerNavigationDirection.forward, animated: false, completion: nil)
    }

    func pageViewController(_ pageViewController: UIPageViewController, viewControllerBefore viewController: UIViewController)-> UIViewController? {

        let cur = pages.index(of: viewController)!

        // if you prefer to NOT scroll circularly, simply add here:
        // if cur == 0 { return nil }

        let prev = abs((cur - 1) % pages.count)
        return pages[prev]

    }

    func pageViewController(_ pageViewController: UIPageViewController, viewControllerAfter viewController: UIViewController)-> UIViewController? {

        let cur = pages.index(of: viewController)!

        // if you prefer to NOT scroll circularly, simply add here:
        // if cur == (pages.count - 1) { return nil }

        let nxt = abs((cur + 1) % pages.count)
        return pages[nxt]
    }

    func presentationIndex(for pageViewController: UIPageViewController)-> Int {
        return pages.count
    }
}

(Look at the comments - there is code for either looping or linear paging as you prefer.)

That's all there is to it - you're done.

You simply set the transition style on the storyboard,

enter image description here

it is very likely that you want "Scroll", not the other one.

  • 1
    Nice -- this works fantastic! Now all it needs is the page indicators and a way to disable the page curl effect for a simple slide-in to the next view. – Drew Apr 17 '15 at 18:25
  • 2
    This way we cannot programatically change the transitionStyle to Scroll From page curl. To solve that , drag a UIPageVIewController , connect it to the container (as embed) and in Attributed Inspector change transition style. Don't forget to change the class name. – Ajumal Apr 21 '15 at 11:15
  • 1
    @JoeBlow Hi, I've followed your instruction. The IntroPages has show up but I can't swipe It !!. Am I missing something ?? – Tai Dao Sep 12 '15 at 13:36
  • Update: I solved my comment above through conditionally returning nil in the viewControllerBeforeViewController and viewControllerAfterViewController methods. – vikzilla Sep 13 '15 at 3:49
  • Is it possible to handle "pages" array kind of implementation in storyboard itself? If I've 15 view controllers in the flow, instantiating all of them and storing in array might lead to memory issues and app might crash..... – Satyam May 14 '18 at 7:35
19
+100

For someone, who wants to see working page scroll (forward / backward)

-(UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController
     viewControllerBeforeViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController
  {
     NSUInteger currentIndex = [myViewControllers indexOfObject:viewController];
     // get the index of the current view controller on display

     if (currentIndex > 0)
     {
        return [myViewControllers objectAtIndex:currentIndex-1];
        // return the previous viewcontroller
     } else
     {
         return nil;
         // do nothing
     }
  }
-(UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController
 viewControllerAfterViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController
  {
     NSUInteger currentIndex = [myViewControllers indexOfObject:viewController];
     // get the index of the current view controller on display
     // check if we are at the end and decide if we need to present
     // the next viewcontroller
     if (currentIndex < [myViewControllers count]-1)
     {
        return [myViewControllers objectAtIndex:currentIndex+1];
        // return the next view controller
     } else
     {
        return nil;
        // do nothing
     }
  }

Just to add to this great answer by EditOR, here's what you do if you prefer "round and around" paging: still using the same technique of EditOR

-(UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController
        viewControllerBeforeViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController
    {
    NSUInteger currentIndex = [myViewControllers indexOfObject:viewController];

    --currentIndex;
    currentIndex = currentIndex % (myViewControllers.count);
    return [myViewControllers objectAtIndex:currentIndex];
    }

-(UIViewController *)pageViewController:(UIPageViewController *)pageViewController
        viewControllerAfterViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController
    {
    NSUInteger currentIndex = [myViewControllers indexOfObject:viewController];

    ++currentIndex;
    currentIndex = currentIndex % (myViewControllers.count);
    return [myViewControllers objectAtIndex:currentIndex];
    } 
  • It works perfectly, EditOR ! – Fattie Sep 24 '14 at 18:46
  • sent a small bounty @EditOR for this great A thanks – Fattie Sep 29 '14 at 6:45
  • @editOR Could you do this in Swift? – MarkP Feb 9 '15 at 2:04
  • Do we have any means to check the current page index number in a page view controller? – G.Abhisek Dec 28 '15 at 10:26
11

Extending Joe Blow's answer with Swift code for the UIPageViewController class:

import UIKit

class MyPageViewController: UIPageViewController, UIPageViewControllerDataSource, UIPageViewControllerDelegate {

    var pages = [UIViewController]()

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        self.delegate = self
        self.dataSource = self

        let page1: UIViewController! = storyboard?.instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier("page1")
        let page2: UIViewController! = storyboard?.instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifier("page2")

        pages.append(page1)
        pages.append(page2)

        setViewControllers([page1], direction: UIPageViewControllerNavigationDirection.Forward, animated: false, completion: nil)
    }

    func pageViewController(pageViewController: UIPageViewController, viewControllerBeforeViewController viewController: UIViewController) -> UIViewController? {
        let currentIndex = pages.indexOf(viewController)!
        let previousIndex = abs((currentIndex - 1) % pages.count)
        return pages[previousIndex]
    }

    func pageViewController(pageViewController: UIPageViewController, viewControllerAfterViewController viewController: UIViewController) -> UIViewController? {
        let currentIndex = pages.indexOf(viewController)!
        let nextIndex = abs((currentIndex + 1) % pages.count)
        return pages[nextIndex]
    }

    func presentationCountForPageViewController(pageViewController: UIPageViewController) -> Int {
        return pages.count
    }

    func presentationIndexForPageViewController(pageViewController: UIPageViewController) -> Int {
        return 0
    }
}

Read more on using UIPageViewController with container view with storyboard setup.

  • This is handy, thanks. It should be noted that the above is for the "round and around" paging as mentioned in other answers (paging to the right will eventually start over at the beginning instead of hitting the end and stopping). – Clifton Labrum Feb 5 '16 at 17:45
  • outstanding, @samwize – Fattie Apr 3 '16 at 14:11
  • can you please update this for swift 3? – paper1111 Mar 19 '17 at 12:37
5

There seems to be a lot of questions regarding UIPageViewController in Storyboard.

Here is some demo code to show you how you can use the UIPageViewController in storyboard as a standalone full screen view or as a UIContainerView, if you want to page only a small area of your screen.

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

1

Updated for Swift 3:

class YourPageViewController: UIPageViewController, UIPageViewControllerDataSource, UIPageViewControllerDelegate {

    var pages = [UIViewController]()

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        self.delegate = self
        self.dataSource = self

        let page1: UIViewController! = storyboard?.instantiateViewController(withIdentifier: "page1")
        let page2: UIViewController! = storyboard?.instantiateViewController(withIdentifier: "page2")

        pages.append(page1)
        pages.append(page2)

        setViewControllers([page1], direction: UIPageViewControllerNavigationDirection.forward, animated: false, completion: nil)
    }

    func pageViewController(_ pageViewController: UIPageViewController, viewControllerBefore viewController: UIViewController) -> UIViewController? {
        let currentIndex = pages.index(of: viewController)!
        let previousIndex = abs((currentIndex - 1) % pages.count)
        return pages[previousIndex]
    }

    func pageViewController(_ pageViewController: UIPageViewController, viewControllerAfter viewController: UIViewController) -> UIViewController? {
        let currentIndex = pages.index(of: viewController)!
        let nextIndex = abs((currentIndex + 1) % pages.count)
        return pages[nextIndex]
    }

    func presentationIndex(for pageViewController: UIPageViewController) -> Int {
        return pages.count
    }
}
0

To have infinite scroll back using @samwize's answer you need to add conditional to check for negative values. Otherwise you just switch between the first and second page. This is only necessary if you plan on having more than two pages.

func pageViewController(_ pageViewController: UIPageViewController,
                            viewControllerBefore viewController: UIViewController) -> UIViewController? {
        let currentIndex = pages.index(of: viewController)!
        var previousIndex = (currentIndex - 1) % pages.count
        if previousIndex < 0 {previousIndex = pages.count - 1}
        return pages[previousIndex]
    }
-1

The problem is that you're improperly reusing UIViewController instances:

myViewControllers = @[tuto1, tuto2, tuto1, tuto2];

I would suggest you to have an NSMutableSet that would serve as a pool of reusable UIViewController instances.

In viewControllerBeforeViewController: and viewControllerBeforeViewController: search your NSMutableSet using NSPredicate to find a UIViewController with parentViewController equal to nil. If you find one, return it. If not, instantiate a new one, add it to the NSMutableSet and then return it.

When you're done and your tests are passing, you can extract the pool into its own class.

  • 1
    This does not seem to be correct, Rudolf. It works perfectly just with an ordinary array. No problem at all. All four VCs are just "there" - it's no problem. – Fattie Sep 24 '14 at 18:49
  • @JoeBlow Yeah, array or set, it's up to you. The important thing is the algorithm, especially fact that UIPageViewController becomes the parentViewController. Based on that, you can filter the array/set and find an unused instance of UIViewController. – Rudolf Adamkovič Sep 25 '14 at 3:40

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