8

I have an ASP.NET MVC page that has JQuery Editable Datatable that has 14 columns. I have a button (Apply No Findings)to do Client side calcultions snd apply for all Rows in that table.

When we click on this button, after applying calculations for every 4 Rows, it is displaying this "Stop Running Script" Message.

I verified the settings. In the Internet Options, Advanced tab, "Disable Script debugging(Internet Explorer)" option is Checked. And "Display a Notification about Script Error" is Unchecked.

I am using Internet Explorer 8. I Now it does not happen on IE9. But this being the server, we cannot upgrade to IE9.

I did the Research and tried these two options and nothing worked.

Example(1): http://www.codeproject.com/Tips/406739/Preventing-Stop-running-this-script-in-Browsers

Example(2): http://www.picnet.com.au/blogs/guido/post/2010/03/04/how-to-prevent-stop-running-this-script-message-in-browsers/

Anyone had this isse and any suggestions are highly appreciated.

This is actual code that is throwing the Script Message:

for(i < iTotalRecords;i++) 
      {  

            var row = oTableAuditLines.fnGetData(i); 
            oTableAuditLines.fnUpdate("NF",i,1); 
            UndoHCPCS(row,i);
            UndoHCPCSModCodes(row,i);
            UndoLineUnitCount(row,i);
            oTableAuditLines.fnUpdate("", i, 6); //Reset Denial Reason Code
            UndoNonCoveredCharges(row,i);
            CalculateAmountPaidAtLine(row,i);
            CalculateEstimatedRecoveryAmountAtLine(row,i);
      }
      UpdateSummaryLine();
      UpdateSummaryLineReasonCode();

By referring sample code in Example(2), I changed the code as below and I am still getting the Script message:

//This function is to avoid Script Running Message

  RepeatingOperation = function(op, yieldEveryIteration) 
  {  
  var count = 0;  
  var instance = this;  
  this.step = function(args) 
  {    
  if (++count >= yieldEveryIteration) 
  {      
  count = 0;      
  setTimeout(function() { op(args); }, 1, [])      
  return;      
  }    
  op(args);  
  };
  };

  function ApplyNoFindings()
  {

    var i = 0;
    var ro = new RepeatingOperation(function() 
     {  

     var row = oTableAuditLines.fnGetData(i); 
            oTableAuditLines.fnUpdate("NF",i,1); 
            UndoHCPCS(row,i);
            UndoHCPCSModCodes(row,i);
            UndoLineUnitCount(row,i);
            oTableAuditLines.fnUpdate("", i, 6); //Reset Denial Reason Code
            UndoNonCoveredCharges(row,i);
            CalculateAmountPaidAtLine(row,i);
            CalculateEstimatedRecoveryAmountAtLine(row,i);

     if (++i < iTotalRecords) 
     { 
        ro.step(); 
     }  
     else 
     { 
        UpdateSummaryLine();
        UpdateSummaryLineReasonCode();
     }  
     }, 100);
     ro.step();

}

What am i doing wrong here?

  • 2
    You shouldn't be looking at not displaying the slow code warning message, you should be looking at optimising your code. – Rory McCrossan Aug 23 '13 at 12:57
  • 1
    "What am i doing wrong here?" ... You're using ASP.Net, duh!? No but seriously, Rory is correct. You data table code is already doing to much. One of the main powers of ASP MVC is the ability to let the server, via C# or even the XAML, handle "calculations" and writing HTML to be presented in the view. Have you ever done the Radio walkthrough? It gives you a good idea on how to handle more of this server side and send nothing but straight HTML to your "table" thus creating less confusion client side and causing less chance for client-side errors. – SpYk3HH Aug 23 '13 at 13:00
  • I added javascript tag and updated the title to be more relevant. Hope you're ok with this. – Khanh TO Aug 23 '13 at 15:26
11

The problem is javascript is single-threaded, so if there is a function that takes too long to complete, this function could cause the UI not responding. Therefore, the browser will warn the user about long running script by displaying the message: "Stop running this script". The solutions to this problem are:

  • Optimize your code so the function does not take so long.
  • Use setTimeout to break the function execution into many pieces that are short enough.

Example code pattern:

var array = []; //assume that this is a very big array
var divideInto = 4;
var chunkSize = rowCount/divideInto;
var iteration = 0;

setTimeout(function doStuff(){
  var base = chunkSize * iteration;
  var To = Math.min(base+chunkSize,array.length);
  while (base < To ){
      //process array[base]
      base++;
  }
  iteration++;
  if (iteration < divideInto)
      setTimeout(doStuff,0); //schedule for next phase
},0);

The solution you take in your Example(2) is correct, but there is a problem in your code. That's the setTimeout does not run. Try changing your code like this:

RepeatingOperation = function(op, yieldEveryIteration) 
  {  
  var count = 0;  
  var instance = this;  
  this.step = function(args) 
    {    
       op(args); 
       if (++count <= yieldEveryIteration) 
       {          
         setTimeout(function() { instance.step(args); }, 1, [])         
       }    
    };   
  };

Modify your function ApplyNoFindings(), try this:

if (++i > iTotalRecords) 
 { 
    UpdateSummaryLine();
    UpdateSummaryLineReasonCode();
 }  

instead of:

if (++i < iTotalRecords) 
     { 
        ro.step(); 
     }  
     else 
     { 
        UpdateSummaryLine();
        UpdateSummaryLineReasonCode();
     }  

Note: not tested, just give you an idea how it should work

  • I will try this... – Rita Aug 23 '13 at 14:05
  • I tried this and working for me. :-) Great! – Rita Aug 23 '13 at 15:08
4

Despite another answer already accepted I want to place here general information for developers who will have this problem in feature:

By this link you can find information how to fix this from user side http://support.microsoft.com/kb/175500 - user can add one Registry key.

Also you can find there information about when this "Running slow" message appears:

By default, the key does not exist. If the key has not been added, the default threshold limit for the time-out dialog box is 5,000,000 statements for Internet Explorer 4 and later versions.

As you see slowness measured in javascript statements, not in time.

0

You can also consider HTML 5 workers

A web worker is a JavaScript running in the background, without affecting the performance of the page. When executing scripts in an HTML page, the page becomes unresponsive until the script is finished. A web worker is a JavaScript that runs in the background, independently of other scripts, without affecting the performance of the page.

Creating a new worker is simple. All you need to do is call the Worker() constructor, specifying the URI of a script to execute in the worker thread, set the worker's Worker.onmessage property to an appropriate event handler function.

var myWorker = new Worker("my_task.js");

myWorker.onmessage = function (oEvent) {
  console.log("Called back by the worker!\n");
};

Alternatively, you could use addEventListener() :

var myWorker = new Worker("my_task.js");

myWorker.addEventListener("message", function (oEvent) {
  console.log("Called back by the worker!\n");
}, false);

myWorker.postMessage(""); // start the worker.

You can see more details at: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Guide/Performance/Using_web_workers

  • 4
    Web workers are worth publicising - but unfortunately, they won't help with this particular warning which mainly occurs in IE8 as in this question: IE8 does not support web workers. – user568458 Jan 23 '14 at 15:26

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