1

I have an abstract class, AbstractNode, and a concrete class which extends it- Node.

I am trying to "program to an interface" by declaring objects of AbstractClass and instantiating them with new Node().

When I try to use the variables in Node after initializing them in the constructor, I get a Null Pointer. But everything works fine if I use a getter method instead. What am I missing?

public abstract class AbstractNode
{    
    String str;
    public abstract String getStr();
}

public class Node extends AbstractNode
{
    String str;

    public Node()
    {
        str= new String();
    }

    public String getStr()
    {
        return str;
    }
}

And the main method looks like this:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    AbstractNode n= new Node();
    String nullStr= n.str;
    String regularStr= n.getStr();
}

Now, nullStr contains a null reference, and regularStr contains a reference to n.str. What is happening in here? I can access other primitive type fields which do not require initialization, like int, directly without any getter methods.

7

You're "shadowing" the variable str. AbstractNode has a String named str, and then Node has a different String, also named str. The constructor for Node assigns an empty string to Node.str, but AbstractNode.str is still null because it's never been assigned. getStr() returns the value in Node.str because that's the "nearest" variable named str it sees. Your code in main is reading AbstractNode.str because the compiler is resolving its full name at compile time, and the declared type of the variable n is AbstractNode. Remove the duplicate String str in Node.

2

Now, nullStr contains a Null reference, and regularStr contains a reference to n.str. What is happening in here?

You've got two str variables - one declared in AbstractNode, and one declared in Node.

Now n is declared to be AbstractNode, so this:

String nullStr = n.str;

fetches the value of the variable declared in AbstractNode, whereas this:

String regularStr= n.getStr();

calls the method declared in Node, which returns the variable declared in Node.

Lessons you should learn:

  • Decide how many pieces of state an object should have, and only declare that many variables. Any time you have two variables with the same name in a class hierarchy, you should at least feel uncomfortable. If they genuinely represent different pieces of state, you should be able to find different names.
  • If you only have private fields, shadowing becomes mostly irrelevant, as you won't have direct access to the fields anyway.

I would suggest a fix of only declaring str in AbstractNode, ideally making it final, and making a protected constructor which accepts a value for it. You probably want to have an accessor to that in AbstractNode as well, although it's unclear. str isn't a descriptive name for the variable either - is it the value of the node? The name of the node? Who knows. My classes would be something like this:

public abstract class AbstractNode {
    private final String name;

    protected AbstractNode(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public abstract String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    // Presumably some abstract methods?
}

public final class Node extends AbstractNode {
    public Node() {
        super("Some default name");
    }
}
1

The problem is that while methods are overridable, fields are not.

Because you declared the type of the variable as AbstractNode, the expression n.str references the field in AbstractNode, even though the actual type is Node. This is because fields are statically bound at compile time to the type.

Methods on the other hand are resolved at runtime, that's why you can override them: the expression n.getStr() is resolved based on the actual type of the object.

0
public String getStr()
{
    return str;
}

and

String regularStr= n.getStr();

This function is overriden and at runtime the corresponding function in Node class is selected and hence you get appropriate results.

But when you say

String nullStr= n.str;

n variable from AbstractNode class is fetched(which is null).Note that Variables are read only and cannot be overriden,

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