58

I am defining scheduled jobs with cron style patterns in Spring, using the @Scheduled annotation.

The cron pattern is stored in a config properties file. Actually there are two properties files: one default config, and one profile config that is environment dependent (e.g. dev, test, prod customer 1, prod customer 2 etc.) and overrides some of the default values.

I configured a property placeholder bean in my spring context which allows me to use ${} style placeholders to import values from my properties files.

The job beans looks like this:

@Component
public class ImagesPurgeJob implements Job {

    private Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(this.getClass());

    @Override
    @Transactional(readOnly=true)
    @Scheduled(cron = "${jobs.mediafiles.imagesPurgeJob.schedule}")
    public void execute() {
        //Do something
            //can use DAO or other autowired beans here
    }
}

Relevant parts of my context XML :

<!-- Enable configuration of scheduled tasks via annotations -->
    <task:annotation-driven/>

<!-- Load configuration files and allow '${}' style placeholders -->
    <bean class="org.springframework.context.support.PropertySourcesPlaceholderConfigurer">
        <property name="locations">
            <list>
                <value>classpath:config/default-config.properties</value>
                <value>classpath:config/environment-config.properties</value>
            </list>
        </property>
        <property name="ignoreUnresolvablePlaceholders" value="true"/>
        <property name="ignoreResourceNotFound" value="false"/>
    </bean>

I really like this. It's quite simple and clean with minimal XML.

However I have one more requirement: some of these jobs can be totally disabled in some cases.

So, before I used Spring to manage them I created them manually and there is a boolean parameter along with the cron parameter in the config files, to specify if the job has to be enabled or not:

jobs.mediafiles.imagesPurgeJob.enable=true or false
jobs.mediafiles.imagesPurgeJob.schedule=0 0 0/12 * * ?

How can I use this parameter in Spring to conditionally create or just plainly ignore the bean, depending on this config parameter?

One obvious workaround would be to define a cron pattern that would never evaluate, so the job is never executed. But the bean would still be created and the config would be a bit obscure, so I feel there must be a better solution.

  • Did you ever find an answer for this? – Chaos Jan 21 '14 at 1:35
  • 1
    @Chaos : Nope, still using extra boolean property for this. – Pierre Henry Jan 31 '14 at 10:37
  • "a cron pattern that would never evaluate" this does not work, the spring scheduler code requires a valid "next run date" otherwise it throws an exception. (might not be true for all versions) – David Balažic Jan 13 '17 at 15:42
39
@Component
public class ImagesPurgeJob implements Job {

    private Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(this.getClass());

    @Value("${jobs.mediafiles.imagesPurgeJob.enable}")
    private boolean imagesPurgeJobEnable;

    @Override
    @Transactional(readOnly=true)
    @Scheduled(cron = "${jobs.mediafiles.imagesPurgeJob.schedule}")
    public void execute() {

         //Do something
        //can use DAO or other autowired beans here
        if(imagesPurgeJobEnable){

            Do your conditional job here...

        }
    }
}
  • 13
    Thanks, this is an option, but I'd rather not instantiate the bean at all than create the bean and have a method execute periodically, even though it does nothing. – Pierre Henry Aug 26 '13 at 7:10
  • 2
    I ended up implementing it like this, because it was simple although not perfect. And I learnt about the @Value annotation which is nice. – Pierre Henry Aug 27 '13 at 9:55
  • 1
    Glade to hear. thanks... – Prabhakaran Aug 27 '13 at 9:58
  • 9
    instead of "do your job here" I'd rather check for if (!enabled) { return;} I think it's cleaner that way. – Jeff Wang Feb 27 '15 at 22:21
27

Spring Boot provides @ConditionalOnProperty, which would be perfect if you were using Spring Boot. This annotation is a specialization of @Conditional, introduced with Spring 4.0.0.

Assuming you're just using "regular" spring and not Spring Boot, you could create your own Condition implementation for use with @Conditional that would mimic Spring Boot's @ConditionalOnProperty.

  • 2
    Ideally this should work but it does not for my case with 1.3.2-RELEASE of Spring Boot. – dARKpRINCE Feb 10 '16 at 14:07
  • Also wasn't able to do this with the @ConditionalOnProperty in SpringBoot 1.4.0 – ETL Aug 13 '16 at 23:20
  • 2
    According to the @Conditional docs, the annotation only applies at the method level for methods annotated with @Bean, ie. a bean definition. – jordanpg Feb 22 '17 at 21:39
24

You can group schedule methods by conditions into number of services and init them like this:

@Service
@ConditionalOnProperty("yourConditionPropery")
public class SchedulingService {

@Scheduled
public void task1() {...}

@Scheduled
public void task2() {...}

}
  • Can you put @ConditionalOnProperty on single method? Or specify different properties for different @Scheduled methods? – izogfif Aug 10 '18 at 13:16
  • @izogfif As far a I understand it, it can only be placed on methods, which create a @Bean. @ConditionalOnPropertyinherits from Conditional. Link – kamwo Apr 23 at 10:46
6

If you are looking to toggle @EnableScheduling from a property you can do this in Spring Boot by moving the @EnableScheduling annotation to a configuration class and use @ConditionalOnProperty as follows:

@Configuration
@EnableScheduling
@ConditionalOnProperty(prefix = "com.example.scheduling", name="enabled", havingValue="true", matchIfMissing = true)
public class SchedulingConfiguration {

}

This will disable scheduling for the application. This may be useful in a situation where you want to be able to run the application once or scheduled depending on how it's being started.

From wilkinsona's comment on here: https://github.com/spring-projects/spring-boot/issues/12682

4

Your question states to condition the actual creation of the bean. You can do this easily with this parameter by using @Profile if you are using at least Spring 3.1.

See the documentation here: http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.1.x/javadoc-api/org/springframework/context/annotation/Profile.html

  • While profiles would be fine in a simple dev/prod environments set, I feel they are not really adapted to multiple production environments (as in multiple customers with different features switched on/off) and would not mix well with our existing configuration management based on properties files and maven build-time selection of active profile. Right now all environment-dependent parameters are centralized in a single properties file. The Spring config is the same for all. That would not be the case if we use spring profiles. – Pierre Henry Aug 26 '13 at 7:56
  • You can conditionally activate spring profiles in a custom initializer (eg. by extending ApplicationContextInitializer<ConfigurableWebApplicationContext> and adding it to your web.xml). Then in your initializer, you can get the environment and activate profiles based on property settings, eg. String flag = environment.getProperty("my.custom.property"); if ( "true".equals(flag) ) { environment.activateProfile("MY_CUSTOM_PROFILE") }. We use this a lot for different features in different customer environments, and also to enable/disable certain features for tests (eg. enable zero-dep service). – jugglingcats Nov 26 '14 at 9:59
3

The most efficient way to disable @Scheduled in Spring. Just set crone expression like "-". It will disable the @Scheduled.

@Scheduled(cron = "-")
public void autoEvictAllCache() {
    LOGGER.info("Refresing the Cache Start :: " + new Date());
    activeMQUtility.sendToTopicCacheEviction("ALL");
    LOGGER.info("Refresing the Cache Complete :: " + new Date());
}

For more info:

enter image description here

2
@Component
public class CurrencySyncServiceImpl implements CurrencySyncService {

    private static Boolean isEnableSync;
    /**
     * Currency Sync FixedDelay in minutes
     */
    private static Integer fixedDelay;

    @Transactional
    @Override
    @Scheduled(fixedDelayString = "#{${currency.sync.fixedDelay}*60*1000}")
    public void sync() {
        if(CurrencySyncServiceImpl.isEnableSync) {
            //Do something
            //you can use DAO or other autowired beans here.
        }
    }

    @Value("${currency.sync.fixedDelay}")
    public void setFixedDelay(Integer fixedDelay) {
        CurrencySyncServiceImpl.fixedDelay = fixedDelay;
    }

    @Value("${currency.sync.isEnable}")
    public void setIsEnableSync(Boolean isEnableSync) {
        CurrencySyncServiceImpl.isEnableSync = isEnableSync;
    }
}
  • 1
    You are not disabling scheduler instead you add conditional in the login – Harshal Patil Aug 7 '18 at 5:36
0

I know my answer is a hack, but giving a valid cron expression that never executes may fix the issue (in the environment specific configuration), Quartz: Cron expression that will never execute

0

You can also create a Bean based on condition and that Bean can have a Scheduled method.

@Component
@Configuration
@EnableScheduling
public class CustomCronComponent {
    @Bean
    @ConditionalOnProperty(value = "my.cron.enabled", matchIfMissing = true, havingValue = "true")
    public MyCronTask runMyCronTask() {
        return new MyCronTask();
    }
}

and

@Component
public class MyCronTask {
    @Scheduled(cron = "${my.cron.expression}")
    public void run() {
        String a = "";
    }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.