I came to a part in my java program where I need to round up to the nearest hundred and thought that there was probably some way to do it but I guess not. So I searched the net for examples or any answers and I've yet to find any since all examples appear to be to the nearest hundred. I just want to do this and round UP. Maybe there's some simple solution that I'm overlooking. I have tried Math.ceil and other functions but have not found an answer as of yet. If anyone could help me with this issue I would greatly appreciate it.

If my number is 203, I want the result rounded to be 300. You get the point.

  1. 801->900
  2. 99->100
  3. 14->100
  4. 452->500
up vote 40 down vote accepted

Take advantage of integer division, which truncates the decimal portion of the quotient. To make it look like it's rounding up, add 99 first.

int rounded = ((num + 99) / 100 ) * 100;

Examples:

801: ((801 + 99) / 100) * 100 → 900 / 100 * 100 → 9 * 100 = 900
99 : ((99 + 99) / 100) * 100 → 198 / 100 * 100 → 1 * 100 = 100
14 : ((14 + 99) / 100) * 100 → 113 / 100 * 100 → 1 * 100 = 100
452: ((452 + 99) / 100) * 100 → 551 / 100 * 100 → 5 * 100 = 500
203: ((203 + 99) / 100) * 100 → 302 / 100 * 100 → 3 * 100 = 300
200: ((200 + 99) / 100) * 100 → 299 / 100 * 100 → 2 * 100 = 200

Relevant Java Language Specification quote, Section 15.17.2:

Integer division rounds toward 0. That is, the quotient produced for operands n and d that are integers after binary numeric promotion (§5.6.2) is an integer value q whose magnitude is as large as possible while satisfying |d · q| ≤ |n|.

  • Wow, I never thought of taking advantage of truncation like that. This answer is pretty awesome. Thank you very much for teaching me something! – Tastybrownies Aug 23 '13 at 16:34
  • *Side note --- if you are working with float point values, rather than casting an int, most languages support a floor function in some way or another. – Albert Renshaw Jul 15 '14 at 3:52
  • @DaSh Yes it works. Rounding 0 up to the nearest hundred is 0, because 0 is the nearest multiple of 100, and ((0 + 99) / 100) * 100 -> 99 / 100 * 100 -> 0 * 100 = 0. – rgettman Dec 1 '14 at 17:16
  • @rgettman My bad. – Daniil Shevelev Dec 1 '14 at 17:48
  • @rgettman Excellent! Simple and elegant. I was trying to make some kind of equation for this but failed. – kirtan403 Dec 21 '16 at 12:15

Here is an algorithm which I belive works for any "multiple of" case. Let me know what you think.

int round (int number,int multiple){

    int result = multiple;

    //If not already multiple of given number

    if (number % multiple != 0){

        int division = (number / multiple)+1;

        result = division * multiple;

    }

    return result;

}
  • 1
    Thanks worked for me. Only alteration I felt is first line should be: int result = number; – vanval Apr 20 '17 at 20:06
int roundUpNumberByUsingMultipleValue(double number, int multiple) {

        int result = multiple;

        if (number % multiple == 0) {
            return (int) number;
        }

        // If not already multiple of given number

        if (number % multiple != 0) {

            int division = (int) ((number / multiple) + 1);

            result = division * multiple;

        }
        return result;

    }

Example:
System.out.println("value 1 =" + round(100.125,100));   
System.out.println("value 2 =" + round(163,50));
System.out.println("value 3 =" + round(200,100));
System.out.println("value 4 =" + round(235.33333333,100));
System.out.println("value 5 =" + round(0,100));

OutPut: 
value 1 =200
value 2 =200
value 3 =200
value 4 =300
value 5 =0
  • Posting just a piece of code does not help a lot, you should consider adding some explanation to you answers. – mohacs Jul 19 '14 at 13:57

Try this:

(int) (Math.ceil(number/100.0))*100
long i = 2147483648L;
if(i % 100 != 0) {
   long roundedI = (100 - (i % 100)) + i;
}

Example:

649: (100 - (649 % 100)) + 649 -> (100 - 49) + 649) -> 51 + 649 = 700
985: (100 - (985 % 100)) + 985 -> (100 - 85) + 985) -> 15 + 985 = 1000

Long datatype is used to make sure the limitation of integer range should not cause any problem for larger values. For ex, this might be very important in case of an amount value (banking domain).

I don't have enought reputation to add a comment to O.C.'s answer but I think it should be:

`
if (number % multiple != 0) {
    int division = (number / multiple) + 1;
    result = division * multiple;
} else {
    result = Math.max(multiple, number);
}
`

with the else so that, for example round(9, 3) = 9, otherwise it would be round(9, 3) = 3

A simple implementation of rgettman which gives:
roudUp(56007)=60000
roudUp(4511)=5000
roudUp(1000)=1000
roudUp(867)=900
roudUp(17)=20
roudUp(5)=10
roudUp(0)=0


import java.util.*;

public class Main {
    static int roundUp(int src){
        int len = String.valueOf(src).length()-1;
        if (len==0) len=1;
        int d = (int) Math.pow((double) 10, (double) len);
        return (src + (d-1))/d*d;
    }
    public static void main(String[] args)  {
        System.out.println("roudUp(56007)="+roundUp(56007));
        System.out.println("roudUp(4511)="+roundUp(4511));
        System.out.println("roudUp(1000)="+roundUp(1000));
        System.out.println("roudUp(867)="+roundUp(867));
        System.out.println("roudUp(17)="+roundUp(17));
        System.out.println("roudUp(5)="+roundUp(5));
        System.out.println("roudUp(0)="+roundUp(0));
    }
}

One other way is to use BigDecimal

private static double round(double number, int precision, RoundingMode roundingMode) {
    BigDecimal bd = null;
    try {
        bd = BigDecimal.valueOf(number);
    } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
        // input is probably a NaN or infinity
        return number;
    }
    bd = bd.setScale(precision, roundingMode);
    return bd.doubleValue();
}

round(102.23,0,RoundingMode.UP) = 103  
round(102.23,1,RoundingMode.UP) = 102.3  
round(102.23,2,RoundingMode.UP) = 102.24  
round(102.23,-1,RoundingMode.UP) = 110  
round(102.23,-2,RoundingMode.UP) = 200  
round(102.23,-3,RoundingMode.UP) = 1000

The below code works for me to round an integer to the next 10 or 100 or 500 or 1000 etc.

public class MyClass {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        int actualValue = 34199;
        int nextRoundedValue = 500 // change this based on your round requirment ex: 10,100,500,...
        int roundedUpValue = actualValue;

        //Rounding to next 500
        if(actualValue%nextRoundedValue != 0)
          roundedUpValue =
(((actualValue/nextRoundedValue)) * nextRoundedValue) + nextRoundedValue;
         System.out.println(roundedUpValue);
    }
}

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