-1

Here is my header file:

class MapObject: public ScreenObject {
    static float xoffset, yoffset;
public:
    static float Getxoffset() {
        return xoffset;
    }

};

#endif // MAPOBJECT_H

However on the line return xoffset; I get the following error: undefined reference to `MapObject::xoffset' why?

5
  • 5
    You never defined xoffset, only declared it. Put this in a global scope of exactly one source file: float MapObject::xoffset;.
    – jrok
    Aug 23 '13 at 21:29
  • 1
    Did you define the statics xoffset and yoffset in your .cpp source file to give them proper linkage ? Remember, non-const statics have to be externally defined as well as declared in-class.
    – WhozCraig
    Aug 23 '13 at 21:29
  • 1
    you need to the static variables it in the .cpp file: float MapObject::xoffset, etc. But are you sure you want to have those static? Aug 23 '13 at 21:30
  • @WhozCraig Is everything not declared in private? Aug 23 '13 at 21:34
  • interesting makes sense, thanks for the info. ill remove my comment. Aug 23 '13 at 21:38
7

Put this in a source file (by the looks of it MapObject.cpp)

#include "MapObject.h"

float MapObject::xoffset = 0;
float MapObject::yoffset = 0;


//... the rest of your MapObject code here...

In C++ non-const static members must be both declared in the class definition and defined with global scope to properly give the linker something to reference.

4
  • What do you mean by "defined with external linkage" ?
    – Mahesh
    Aug 23 '13 at 21:36
  • @Mahesh See this question
    – WhozCraig
    Aug 23 '13 at 21:40
  • 1
    I understand the linkage concept. I didn't understand in the context of your sentence. I think you meant the definitions should go at global scope. Isn't it ?
    – Mahesh
    Aug 23 '13 at 21:43
  • @Mahesh +1 You're correct. Thank you for the correction. Updated accordingly (been a long day).
    – WhozCraig
    Aug 23 '13 at 21:45
1

You have to have something like this in your MapObject.cpp:

float MapObject::xoffset = 0.0f;
float MapObject::yoffset = 0.0f;

This way you define and initialize them.

3
  • I gave credit to @WhozCraig
    – Csaba Toth
    Aug 23 '13 at 21:36
  • thank you for your answer, however it should not be static float, just float Aug 23 '13 at 22:20
  • @user2673108 I'll correct it.
    – Csaba Toth
    Aug 23 '13 at 22:22

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