475

I am creating a program that reads a file and if the first line of the file is not blank, it reads the next four lines. Calculations are performed on those lines and then the next line is read. If that line is not empty it continues. However, I am getting this error:

ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: ''.

It is reading the first line but can't convert it to an integer.

What can I do to fix this problem?

The code:

file_to_read = raw_input("Enter file name of tests (empty string to end program):")
try:
    infile = open(file_to_read, 'r')
    while file_to_read != " ":
        file_to_write = raw_input("Enter output file name (.csv will be appended to it):")
        file_to_write = file_to_write + ".csv"
        outfile = open(file_to_write, "w")
        readings = (infile.readline())
        print readings
        while readings != 0:
            global count
            readings = int(readings)
            minimum = (infile.readline())
            maximum = (infile.readline())
3
  • 5
    You should consider using with open(file_to_read, 'r') as infile: there. Sep 14 '17 at 11:48
  • 1
    For anyone currently looking here. The error may be that one of the lines isn't in integer form. Eg: "yes" isn't in the correct form but "3" is. For this question the first line may not have any "1"s, "2"s, "3"s... to convert to an int.
    – Crupeng
    Jul 24 '20 at 17:58
  • i got this error when input string had space between digits. this error basically means your input string is not valid for string to integer conversion. for conversion, your string should only and only contain following characters: +-.0123456789
    – M9J_cfALt
    Aug 5 '20 at 12:41

19 Answers 19

514

Just for the record:

>>> int('55063.000000')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: '55063.000000'

Got me here...

>>> int(float('55063.000000'))
55063

Has to be used!

9
  • 120
    I'll just add, to provide more clarity for future readers, that indeed, int(float('1.0')) works when int('1.0') throws the ValueError.
    – katyhuff
    Apr 26 '13 at 16:53
  • 6
    This should be the accepted top answer to this question. I almost closed the page and didn't see it. Thanks!
    – iTurki
    Jun 21 '16 at 21:44
  • 2
    add to answer int(float('55063.000000')) as question is get int(). Than it will realy top answer
    – Max
    Mar 15 '17 at 8:41
  • 12
    This answer doesn't appear to have anything to do with the question. The question is asking how one could prevent a ValueError when you call int() on an empty string. "Use float() instead" doesn't solve that problem. You still get a ValueError.
    – Kevin
    May 1 '18 at 18:50
  • 1
    Why not update your answer as per @Kevin's comment above? This is a highly active question and should not be confusing to someone who directly search for the specific error in question title.
    – Austin
    Jun 29 '20 at 4:17
117

The following are totally acceptable in python:

  • passing a string representation of an integer into int
  • passing a string representation of a float into float
  • passing a string representation of an integer into float
  • passing a float into int
  • passing an integer into float

But you get a ValueError if you pass a string representation of a float into int, or a string representation of anything but an integer (including empty string). If you do want to pass a string representation of a float to an int, as @katyhuff points out above, you can convert to a float first, then to an integer:

>>> int('5')
5
>>> float('5.0')
5.0
>>> float('5')
5.0
>>> int(5.0)
5
>>> float(5)
5.0
>>> int('5.0')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: '5.0'
>>> int(float('5.0'))
5
4
  • 10
    This answer doesn't appear to have anything to do with the question. The question is asking how one could prevent a ValueError when you call int() on an empty string. "Use float() instead" doesn't solve that problem. You still get a ValueError.
    – Kevin
    May 1 '18 at 18:53
  • 6
    @Kevin Even though this does not directly answer the OP's question. It does however help people that have this problem and don't mind the int(float(x)). As this is the first question to pop up when searching for this error. Sep 16 '19 at 17:23
  • Wow that's incredibly silly. Why not make int() accept a string? That's exactly what I was expecting it to do and not typecast it into float first.....
    – BUFU
    Sep 22 '20 at 11:57
  • typecasting into float doesn't work in my case at least.. error shown is couldnot convert int to float
    – Alex
    Jul 13 at 22:33
65

Pythonic way of iterating over a file and converting to int:

for line in open(fname):
   if line.strip():           # line contains eol character(s)
       n = int(line)          # assuming single integer on each line

What you're trying to do is slightly more complicated, but still not straight-forward:

h = open(fname)
for line in h:
    if line.strip():
        [int(next(h).strip()) for _ in range(4)]     # list of integers

This way it processes 5 lines at the time. Use h.next() instead of next(h) prior to Python 2.6.

The reason you had ValueError is because int cannot convert an empty string to the integer. In this case you'd need to either check the content of the string before conversion, or except an error:

try:
   int('')
except ValueError:
   pass      # or whatever
5
  • 4
    Your try/except doesn't distinguish between something reasonable expectable (blank/empty line) and something nasty like a non-integer. Dec 3 '09 at 19:47
  • and why would you want to distinguish those things? Dec 4 '09 at 1:34
  • 3
    because one is reasonably expectable and ignorable but the other is indicative of an error Dec 4 '09 at 21:07
  • 3
    and why is a blank line reasonably expectable and non-integer is not? Dec 5 '09 at 2:18
  • 1
    this is good if you are sure that your list is actually a list of stringified integers. If you are not sure you can do n = int(line) if line.is_integer() else int(float(line)) Jul 25 '18 at 15:30
25

I found a work around. Python will convert the number to a float. Simply calling float first then converting that to an int will work: output = int(float(input))

1
  • Is this answer not equivalent to that given by @FdoBad?
    – Gathide
    Aug 11 at 11:13
15

The reason is that you are getting an empty string or a string as an argument into int. Check if it is empty or it contains alpha characters. If it contains characters, then simply ignore that part.

2
  • 2
    This looks more like a comment. When you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. Jun 23 '17 at 13:39
  • 4
    this was exactly what i needed, thank you. I don't get why people on this forum are so obsessed with micromanaging this site
    – John D
    Nov 21 '20 at 9:38
13

The reason you are getting this error is that you are trying to convert a space character to an integer, which is totally impossible and restricted.And that's why you are getting this error.enter image description here

Check your code and correct it, it will work fine

9

So if you have

floatInString = '5.0'

You can convert it to int with floatInInt = int(float(floatInString))

4

You've got a problem with this line:

while file_to_read != " ":

This does not find an empty string. It finds a string consisting of one space. Presumably this is not what you are looking for.

Listen to everyone else's advice. This is not very idiomatic python code, and would be much clearer if you iterate over the file directly, but I think this problem is worth noting as well.

3

Please test this function (split()) on a simple file. I was facing the same issue and found that it was because split() was not written properly (exception handling).

2

I recently came across a case where none of these answers worked. I encountered CSV data where there were null bytes mixed in with the data, and those null bytes did not get stripped. So, my numeric string, after stripping, consisted of bytes like this:

\x00\x31\x00\x0d\x00

To counter this, I did:

countStr = fields[3].replace('\x00', '').strip()
count = int(countStr)

...where fields is a list of csv values resulting from splitting the line.

2
  • You sir are a genius ! Thanks Jul 17 '20 at 23:50
  • You are my hero! Thanks!
    – Nikki
    Feb 15 at 19:20
1
    readings = (infile.readline())
    print readings
    while readings != 0:
        global count
        readings = int(readings)

There's a problem with that code. readings is a new line read from the file - it's a string. Therefore you should not compare it to 0. Further, you can't just convert it to an integer unless you're sure it's indeed one. For example, empty lines will produce errors here (as you've surely found out).

And why do you need the global count? That's most certainly bad design in Python.

1

This could also happen when you have to map space separated integers to a list but you enter the integers line by line using the .input(). Like for example I was solving this problem on HackerRank Bon-Appetit, and the got the following error while compiling enter image description here

So instead of giving input to the program line by line try to map the space separated integers into a list using the map() method.

0
1

your answer is throwing errors because of this line

readings = int(readings)
  1. Here you are trying to convert a string into int type which is not base-10. you can convert a string into int only if it is base-10 otherwise it will throw ValueError, stating invalid literal for int() with base 10.
0

I am creating a program that reads a file and if the first line of the file is not blank, it reads the next four lines. Calculations are performed on those lines and then the next line is read.

Something like this should work:

for line in infile:
    next_lines = []
    if line.strip():
        for i in xrange(4):
            try:
                next_lines.append(infile.next())
            except StopIteration:
                break
    # Do your calculation with "4 lines" here
0

I was getting similar errors, turns out that the dataset had blank values which python could not convert to integer.

2
  • 4
    Could you elaborate a bit more with some examples on how the OP could solve it?
    – fmendez
    Mar 12 '13 at 20:00
  • blank value means empty which can be converted to string float. If you try to convert to float also it will show error Dec 13 '19 at 7:18
0

I got into the same issue when trying to use readlines() inside for loop for same file object... My suspicion is firing readling() inside readline() for same file object caused this error.

Best solution can be use seek(0) to reset file pointer or Handle condition with setting some flag then create new object for same file by checking set condition....

0

This seems like readings is sometimes an empty string and obviously an error crops up. You can add an extra check to your while loop before the int(readings) command like:

while readings != 0 | readings != '':
    global count
    readings = int(readings)
0

I had hard time figuring out the actual reason, it happens when we dont read properly from file. you need to open file and read with readlines() method as below:

with open('/content/drive/pre-processed-users1.1.tsv') as f:
    file=f.readlines()

It corrects the formatted output

0

Another answer in case all of the above solutions are not working for you.

My original error was similar to OP: ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: '52,002'

I then tried the accepted answer and got this error: ValueError: could not convert string to float: '52,002' --this was when I tried the int(float(variable_name))

My solution is to convert the string to a float and leave it there. I just needed to check to see if the string was a numeric value so I can handle it correctly.

try: 
   float(variable_name)
except ValueError:
   print("The value you entered was not a number, please enter a different number")

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