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I have some problems using an integer cast for the pow() function in the C programming language. The compiler I'm using is the Tiny C Compiler (tcc version 0.9.24) for the Windows platform. When executing the following code, it outputs the unexpected result 100, 99:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int main(void)
{
    printf("%d, ", (int) pow(10, 2));
    printf("%d", (int) pow(10, 2));
    return 0;
}

However, at this online compiler the output is as expected: 100, 100. I don't know what is causing this behavior. Any thoughts? Programming error from me, compiler bug?

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  • possible duplicate of What is a simple example of floating point/rounding error? – user529758 Aug 24 '13 at 10:58
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    Guys, why is the first value correct? Shouldn't it be 99, 99 if it was the case for the usual imprecise-then-truncate issue? – ppeterka Aug 24 '13 at 11:02
  • @ppeterka Conspiracy theory #183742: printf("%d", some_integer) is constant-folded at compile time. If the constant-folding algorithm in the compiler is defectious, then the code may very well be changed to puts("99");. The pow() implementation seems to be honest and correct (in the sense that it pays attention to integer powers), though. But we would really need the assembly the compiler generated to prove this. – user529758 Aug 24 '13 at 11:05
  • @H2CO3 same result (100, 99) with tcc with printf("%d, %d", (int) pow(10, 2), (int) pow(10, 2));. This does not answer why the two calls results are treated differently in tcc. – ouah Aug 24 '13 at 11:09
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    @H2CO3: No, it's not a programming error on his side. It's arguably a programming error in his standard library. – tmyklebu Aug 24 '13 at 21:52
2

You found a bug in tcc. Thanks for that. The patch has just been commited to the repository. It will be included in the next release, but that might take a while. You can of course pull the source and build it yourself. The patch is here

http://repo.or.cz/w/tinycc.git/commitdiff/73faaea227a53e365dd75f1dba7a5071c7b5e541

6

Some investigation in assembly code. (OllyDbg)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int main(void)
{
    int x1 = (int) pow(10, 2);
    int x2 = (int) pow(10, 2);
    printf("%d %d", x1, x2);
    return 0;
}

The related assembly section:

FLD QWORD PTR DS:[402000]   // Loads 2.0 onto stack
SUB ESP,8
FSTP QWORD PTR SS:[ESP]
FLD QWORD PTR DS:[402008]   // Loads 10.0 onto stack
SUB ESP,8
FSTP QWORD PTR SS:[ESP]
CALL <JMP.&msvcrt.pow>      // Calls pow API
                            // Returned value 100.00000000000000000
...


FLDCW WORD PTR DS:[402042]  //   OH! LOOK AT HERE
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
...

FLD QWORD PTR DS:[402010]   // Loads 2.0 onto stack
SUB ESP,8
FSTP QWORD PTR SS:[ESP]
FLD QWORD PTR DS:[402018]   // Loads 10.0 onto stack
SUB ESP,8
FSTP QWORD PTR SS:[ESP]
CALL <JMP.&msvcrt.pow>      // Calls pow API again
                            // Returned value 99.999999999999999990

The generated code for two calls is the same, but the outputs are different. I don't know why tcc put FLDCW there. But the main reason of two different values are that line.

Before that line the round Mantissa Precision Control Bits is 53bit (10), but after execution of that line (it loads FPU register control) it will set to 64bits (11). On the other hand Rounding Control is nearest so 99.999999999999999990 is the result. Read more...

 

enter image description here

 


Solution:

After using (int) to cast a float to an int, you should expect this numeric error, because this casting truncates the values between [0, 1) to zero.

Assume the 102 is 99.9999999999. After that cast, the result is 99.

Try to round the result before casting it to integer, for example:

printf("%d", (int) (floor(pow(10, 2) + 0.5)) );

 

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    How are you inspecting the values 100.000... and 99.999...90? Printing floats is non-trivial, and that could possibly be stateful/buggy too. – Quadrescence Aug 24 '13 at 20:23
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    @Quadrescence: There is a panel in OllyDbg (Registers FPU) which inspects the values. (I added an image) – masoud Aug 24 '13 at 21:05
  • Yes, but when I round, how can I be sure that it isn't floor'd to 99.9999 and is still truncated to 99 by the integer conversion? As we just saw that 100 is represented by 99.9999. – Jori Aug 25 '13 at 10:28
  • It's the reason we add 0.5 before floor as written in the above code. – masoud Aug 25 '13 at 12:03
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    @Jori: It is clear that in floor(pow(10, 2)), you would want the result to be 100. However, floor is not passed pow(10, 2). It receives only a number, and it cannot determine intent from this number. When floor receives 99.9999…, it must return 99; there is no other correct choice. The actual problem here is that pow is failing; the exact mathematical result of pow(10, 2) is representable; it is 100; but pow is returning a different value. It is pow that is broken (or the C implementation generally), not floor. – Eric Postpischil Aug 26 '13 at 13:07
0

It seems that the rounding method may change, thus requiring an ASM instruction finit to reset the FPU. In FreeBASIC on Windows, I get 99.9999 even in the first try, and so I think for you after the first try it would be a consistent 99.9999. (But I call this undefined behavior indeed, more than a bug in the C runtime's pow().)

So my advice is not do the conversion with round down. To avoid such issues, use, for example:

int x1 = (int)(pow(10, 2)+.5);

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