Is there any way to compile a java program without having the java file name with its base class name.

If so, please explain..

  • 2
    I don't understand what you mean. What are you trying to achieve? – Ben S Dec 3 '09 at 18:23
  • Why would you want to do that? On a side note, if you want your app to have one name and your main class have another, you can always package your app in a jar file. – Buhb Dec 3 '09 at 18:25
  • Sorry i meant the public class name.... I dont want to save the file with this(public class name) to compile the program......Is this possible..... – Hulk Dec 3 '09 at 18:30
  • The question title should have some clue as to what the question is. – Steve Kuo Dec 3 '09 at 18:31
  • Change question title to something more descriptive. – Phil Dec 3 '09 at 19:15

18 Answers 18

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Your Java file name should always reflect the public class defined within that file. Otherwise, you will get a compiler error. For example, test.java:

public class Foo {}

Trying to compile this gives:

[steven@scstop:~]% javac test.java
test.java:1: class Foo is public, should be declared in a file named Foo.java
public class Foo {
       ^
1 error

So you must have your filename match your public class name, which seems to render your question moot. Either that or I don't understand what you're asking... spending some time explaining what you are actually trying to achieve would go a long way towards asking a more effective question :)

  • Thanks....you are exactly rit.....I know i have to save the file with public class name to compile it......but is it possible no to do this and compile the java program file with sum other name on it..... – Hulk Dec 3 '09 at 18:32
  • 2
    No. The compiler won't allow you to. Please don't try to get around this restriction - as others have mentioned it is a very good thing that Java requires this! If you are trying to achieve some specific goal, if you explain more about what you are trying to accomplish we could suggest alternative methods. – Steven Schlansker Dec 3 '09 at 18:34
  • If you want to your program to have a certain name, you need to either change the name of your class or create a new class that will execute the program. – FloppyDisk Dec 3 '09 at 19:26
  • @Hulk what if you want to compile a java file whose name you don't know? As in, say it's coming from a different source or something. – aandis Jun 24 '14 at 20:16

To answer the question take a look at this example:
Create a file Sample.java

class A 
{ 
   public static void main(String args[])
   { 
      String str[] = {""}; 
      System.out.println("hi"); 
      B.main(str); 
   } 
} 
class B 
{ 
   public static void main(String args[]) 
   { 
     System.out.println("hello");
   }
} 

now you compile it as javac Sample.java and run as java A then output will be

hi 
hello

or you run as java B then output will be
hello

Notice that none of the classes are marked public therefore giving them default access. Files without any public classes have no file naming restrictions.

  • 4
    This works because neither 'A' nor 'B' are public classes. If A was, it would have to be defined in A.java. – DoctorRuss Feb 24 '10 at 10:08
  • Nice one............ – Hulk Apr 21 '10 at 5:44
  • 1
    Nice answer. However, now it's impossible to access them from another packages, because they are no longer public :((( – T.Todua Jan 15 '17 at 20:59

As long as you don't have a public class in your source file, you can name your source file to any name and can compile. But, if you have a public class in your source file, that file should have the name same as your class name. Otherwise, compiler will throw an error.

Example:
Filename: TestFileName.java

public class HelloWorld {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Hello,World\n");
    }
}

Compiling: javac TestFileName.java

Error:

TestFileName.java:1: class HelloWorld is public, should be declared in a file named HelloWorld.java
public class HelloWorld
       ^
1 error

No, the public class name must match the file name. Inner, non public, class names may differ.

You must have a public class with the same name as the file name. This is a Very Good Thing. You CAN have secondary classes inside the same file as long as they are not public. They can still be "default" though, so they can still be used by other classes in the same package.

This should not be done for the most part. Java's naming patterns regarding classes and packages are one of the bigger advantages it has--makes a programmers life easier at no cost.

yes, we compile a java file with a different name than the class, provided that there should not be any public class in that file.

If there is any public class in file then in that case you have to give that name as file name. But if your class does not contain any public class then you can give any name to you class.

Please refer below example to make it more clear:

file name : sample.java

 class A 
 { 
   public static void main(String args[])
  { 
    System.out.println("hi in Class A"); 
  }   
 } 
class B 
{ 
 public static void main(String args[]) 
 { 
    System.out.println("hello in class B");
 }
}

then compile it with(windows) : javac sample.java

then run it : java A

output : hi in Class A

then run it : java B

output : hello in class B

Please check and confirm.

You can use the Java Compile API and compile any java source you wish, the source need not come from a file or could come from a file with an unrelated name. It depends on how obtuse you want to develop your program. ;)

  • Some examples: stackoverflow.com/questions/12173294/… – Vadzim Nov 8 '16 at 11:09
  • It seems Java Compile API requres classname to be specified before compilation. So it can't be used to determine classname from source in case filename is wrong. – Vadzim Nov 8 '16 at 12:15
  • 1
    @Vadzim correct, though that is not the question. – Peter Lawrey Nov 8 '16 at 15:59

I guess what he means is the .java file is named differently than the actual class defined inside it.

I guess this is not possible.

No. You could write a shell script to rename the .java file before compiling it, but javac requires that filenames = class names.

(Also in windows, it's case insensitive, so ASDF.java can compile Asdf.class)

yes, you can choose any name for the file (.java). there is no matter to what are the name of classes in that file means that class names may be totaly different from the file name. you should compile the program with file name and you should run the program with the class name in which the main method exist. main methods may be multiple in different classes so you should run it with the class name in which the main method you want to run......

  • If I understood you correctly, you are wrong - but maybe an example would be helpful to straighten things out. – Till Feb 24 '10 at 8:43
  • as i know i m not wrong. for example create a file sample.java with coding class A { public static void main(String args[]) { String str={""}; System.out.println("hi"); B.main(str); } } class B { public static void main(String args[]) { System.out.println("hello"); } } now u compile it as javac sample.java and run as java A then output will be hi hello – ved Feb 24 '10 at 9:32

we can save the file tootle different name of class name because in java we compile the program but we run the method. we have to compile our program with file name and run our class name

  • 1
    Please make this a comment. – cereallarceny Dec 12 '12 at 23:13

Yes,it is possible to compile a java source file with different file name but you need to make sure none of the classes defined inside are public...when you compile the source file the corresponding .class files for the classes inside the source file are created.

  • Can you provide a simple example of how to do this? Examples are always a good thing! – Stuart R. Jefferys Mar 9 '13 at 18:35

Yes,you can save your java source code file with any other name, not same as your main class name but when you comiple it than byte code file name will be same as your main class name. So for your ease of not to memorize to many names for java code run, You need to have your file name same as your main class than only your file name and byte code file will be with same name.

If class is not public you can save it using other name like if classname is Simple then save it Hard.java. complie->Hard.java run->Simple.java Save your java file by .java only. compile javac .java run java yourclassname For example if my program main class name is A then save by .java only
compile by javac .java
run by java A

yes, we can compile a java file with a different name than the class, provided that there should not be any public class in that file.

If there is any public class in file then in that case you have to give that name as file name. But if your class does not contain any public class then you can give any name to you class.

Please refer below example to make it more clear:

file name : example.java

class A 
 { 
   public static void main(String args[])
  { 
    System.out.println("You are in Class A"); 
  }   
 } 
class B 
{ 
 public static void main(String args[]) 
 { 
    System.out.println("You are in class B");
 }
}

then compile it with : javac example.java

then run it : java A

output : you are in Class A

then run it : java B

output : you are in class B

Please check and confirm.

You can write more than one main methods in java because java provides main method overloading in which main method can also be overloaded . Once you compile the file here example.java Compiler create .class file which contains main method when you run the file with java A it will run the A.class file whih contains the main method of class A and that output will be display on you screen ,but when you run this file with java B ,It runs the B.class file which provides main method of B class So your code is run successfully

According to the other answers the only viable solution is to somehow determine the classname from the source, then use it to rename the file to proper name and compile it as usual.

Yes. This can be done.

The main reason for the class and file name to be same are to make the job of the complier easy to check which class it needs to run, in the whole list of the Java classes.

So it's a good practice to have filename and class name as same.

And you have compile and run a class with different name other than the filename, If you don't have any public methods in this class.

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