I'm using a python script as a driver for a hydrodynamics code. When it comes time to run the simulation, I use subprocess.Popen to run the code, collect the output from stdout and stderr into a subprocess.PIPE --- then I can print (and save to a log-file) the output information, and check for any errors. The problem is, I have no idea how the code is progressing. If I run it directly from the command line, it gives me output about what iteration its at, what time, what the next time-step is, etc.

Is there a way to both store the output (for logging and error checking), and also produce a live-streaming output?

The relevant section of my code:

ret_val = subprocess.Popen( run_command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True )
output, errors = ret_val.communicate()
log_file.write(output)
print output
if( ret_val.returncode ):
    print "RUN failed\n\n%s\n\n" % (errors)
    success = False

if( errors ): log_file.write("\n\n%s\n\n" % errors)

Originally I was piping the run_command through tee so that a copy went directly to the log-file, and the stream still output directly to the terminal -- but that way I can't store any errors (to my knowlege).


Edit:

Temporary solution:

ret_val = subprocess.Popen( run_command, stdout=log_file, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True )
while not ret_val.poll():
    log_file.flush()

then, in another terminal, run tail -f log.txt (s.t. log_file = 'log.txt').

  • 1
    Maybe you can use Popen.poll as in a previous Stack Overflow question. – Paulo Almeida Aug 24 '13 at 18:42
  • Some commands that show progress indication (e.g., git) do so only if their output is a "tty device" (tested via libc isatty()). In that case you may have to open a pseudo-tty. – torek Aug 24 '13 at 19:01
  • @torek what's a (pseudo-)tty? – DilithiumMatrix Aug 24 '13 at 19:02
  • 2
    Devices on Unix-like systems that allow a process to pretend to be a user on a serial port. This is how ssh (server side) works, for instance. See python pty library, and also pexpect. – torek Aug 24 '13 at 19:06
  • Re temporary solution: there's no need to call flush, and there is need to read from the stderr pipe if the subprocess produces much stderr output. There is not room enough in a comment field to explain this... – torek Aug 24 '13 at 19:14

11 Answers 11

up vote 120 down vote accepted

You have two ways of doing this, either by creating an iterator from the read or readline functions and do:

import subprocess
import sys
with open('test.log', 'w') as f:
    process = subprocess.Popen(your_command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
    for c in iter(lambda: process.stdout.read(1), ''):  # replace '' with b'' for Python 3
        sys.stdout.write(c)
        f.write(c)

or

import subprocess
import sys
with open('test.log', 'w') as f:
    process = subprocess.Popen(your_command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
    for line in iter(process.stdout.readline, ''):  # replace '' with b'' for Python 3
        sys.stdout.write(line)
        f.write(line)

Or you can create a reader and a writer file. Pass the writer to the Popen and read from the reader

import io
import time
import subprocess
import sys

filename = 'test.log'
with io.open(filename, 'wb') as writer, io.open(filename, 'rb', 1) as reader:
    process = subprocess.Popen(command, stdout=writer)
    while process.poll() is None:
        sys.stdout.write(reader.read())
        time.sleep(0.5)
    # Read the remaining
    sys.stdout.write(reader.read())

This way you will have the data written in the test.log as well as on the standard output.

The only advantage of the file approach is that your code doesn't block. So you can do whatever you want in the meantime and read whenever you want from the reader in a non-blocking way. When you use PIPE, read and readline functions will block until either one character is written to the pipe or a line is written to the pipe respectively.

  • Ugh :-) write to a file, read from it, and sleep in the loop? There's also a chance the process will end before you've finished reading the file. – Guy Sirton Aug 24 '13 at 19:27
  • @GuySirton just add another read at the end. – Viktor Kerkez Aug 24 '13 at 19:28
  • 11
    With Python 3, you need iter(process.stdout.readline, b'') (i.e. the sentinel passed to iter needs to be a binary string, since b'' != ''. – John Mellor Apr 12 '15 at 17:58
  • 2
    For binary streams, do this:for line in iter(process.stdout.readline, b''): sys.stdout.buffer.write(line) – rrlamichhane Jul 5 '17 at 23:21
  • 2
    Adding to @JohnMellor 's answer, in Python 3 the following modifications were needed: process = subprocess.Popen(command, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT, stdout=subprocess.PIPE) for line in iter(process.stdout.readline, b'') sys.stdout.write(line.decode(sys.stdout.encoding)) – bergercookie Jan 16 at 9:21

Executive Summary (or "tl;dr" version): it's easy when there's at most one subprocess.PIPE, otherwise it's hard.

It may be time to explain a bit about how subprocess.Popen does its thing.

(Caveat: this is for Python 2.x, although 3.x is similar; and I'm quite fuzzy on the Windows variant. I understand the POSIX stuff much better.)

The Popen function needs to deal with zero-to-three I/O streams, somewhat simultaneously. These are denoted stdin, stdout, and stderr as usual.

You can provide:

  • None, indicating that you don't want to redirect the stream. It will inherit these as usual instead. Note that on POSIX systems, at least, this does not mean it will use Python's sys.stdout, just Python's actual stdout; see demo at end.
  • An int value. This is a "raw" file descriptor (in POSIX at least). (Side note: PIPE and STDOUT are actually ints internally, but are "impossible" descriptors, -1 and -2.)
  • A stream—really, any object with a fileno method. Popen will find the descriptor for that stream, using stream.fileno(), and then proceed as for an int value.
  • subprocess.PIPE, indicating that Python should create a pipe.
  • subprocess.STDOUT (for stderr only): tell Python to use the same descriptor as for stdout. This only makes sense if you provided a (non-None) value for stdout, and even then, it is only needed if you set stdout=subprocess.PIPE. (Otherwise you can just provide the same argument you provided for stdout, e.g., Popen(..., stdout=stream, stderr=stream).)

The easiest cases (no pipes)

If you redirect nothing (leave all three as the default None value or supply explicit None), Pipe has it quite easy. It just needs to spin off the subprocess and let it run. Or, if you redirect to a non-PIPE—an int or a stream's fileno()—it's still easy, as the OS does all the work. Python just needs to spin off the subprocess, connecting its stdin, stdout, and/or stderr to the provided file descriptors.

The still-easy case: one pipe

If you redirect only one stream, Pipe still has things pretty easy. Let's pick one stream at a time and watch.

Suppose you want to supply some stdin, but let stdout and stderr go un-redirected, or go to a file descriptor. As the parent process, your Python program simply needs to use write() to send data down the pipe. You can do this yourself, e.g.:

proc = subprocess.Popen(cmd, stdin=subprocess.PIPE)
proc.stdin.write('here, have some data\n') # etc

or you can pass the stdin data to proc.communicate(), which then does the stdin.write shown above. There is no output coming back so communicate() has only one other real job: it also closes the pipe for you. (If you don't call proc.communicate() you must call proc.stdin.close() to close the pipe, so that the subprocess knows there is no more data coming through.)

Suppose you want to capture stdout but leave stdin and stderr alone. Again, it's easy: just call proc.stdout.read() (or equivalent) until there is no more output. Since proc.stdout() is a normal Python I/O stream you can use all the normal constructs on it, like:

for line in proc.stdout:

or, again, you can use proc.communicate(), which simply does the read() for you.

If you want to capture only stderr, it works the same as with stdout.

There's one more trick before things get hard. Suppose you want to capture stdout, and also capture stderr but on the same pipe as stdout:

proc = subprocess.Popen(cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)

In this case, subprocess "cheats"! Well, it has to do this, so it's not really cheating: it starts the subprocess with both its stdout and its stderr directed into the (single) pipe-descriptor that feeds back to its parent (Python) process. On the parent side, there's again only a single pipe-descriptor for reading the output. All the "stderr" output shows up in proc.stdout, and if you call proc.communicate(), the stderr result (second value in the tuple) will be None, not a string.

The hard cases: two or more pipes

The problems all come about when you want to use at least two pipes. In fact, the subprocess code itself has this bit:

def communicate(self, input=None):
    ...
    # Optimization: If we are only using one pipe, or no pipe at
    # all, using select() or threads is unnecessary.
    if [self.stdin, self.stdout, self.stderr].count(None) >= 2:

But, alas, here we've made at least two, and maybe three, different pipes, so the count(None) returns either 1 or 0. We must do things the hard way.

On Windows, this uses threading.Thread to accumulate results for self.stdout and self.stderr, and has the parent thread deliver self.stdin input data (and then close the pipe).

On POSIX, this uses poll if available, otherwise select, to accumulate output and deliver stdin input. All this runs in the (single) parent process/thread.

Threads or poll/select are needed here to avoid deadlock. Suppose, for instance, that we've redirected all three streams to three separate pipes. Suppose further that there's a small limit on how much data can be stuffed into to a pipe before the writing process is suspended, waiting for the reading process to "clean out" the pipe from the other end. Let's set that small limit to a single byte, just for illustration. (This is in fact how things work, except that the limit is much bigger than one byte.)

If the parent (Python) process tries to write several bytes—say, 'go\n'to proc.stdin, the first byte goes in and then the second causes the Python process to suspend, waiting for the subprocess to read the first byte, emptying the pipe.

Meanwhile, suppose the subprocess decides to print a friendly "Hello! Don't Panic!" greeting. The H goes into its stdout pipe, but the e causes it to suspend, waiting for its parent to read that H, emptying the stdout pipe.

Now we're stuck: the Python process is asleep, waiting to finish saying "go", and the subprocess is also asleep, waiting to finish saying "Hello! Don't Panic!".

The subprocess.Popen code avoids this problem with threading-or-select/poll. When bytes can go over the pipes, they go. When they can't, only a thread (not the whole process) has to sleep—or, in the case of select/poll, the Python process waits simultaneously for "can write" or "data available", writes to the process's stdin only when there is room, and reads its stdout and/or stderr only when data are ready. The proc.communicate() code (actually _communicate where the hairy cases are handled) returns once all stdin data (if any) have been sent and all stdout and/or stderr data have been accumulated.

If you want to read both stdout and stderr on two different pipes (regardless of any stdin redirection), you will need to avoid deadlock too. The deadlock scenario here is different—it occurs when the subprocess writes something long to stderr while you're pulling data from stdout, or vice versa—but it's still there.


The Demo

I promised to demonstrate that, un-redirected, Python subprocesses write to the underlying stdout, not sys.stdout. So, here is some code:

from cStringIO import StringIO
import os
import subprocess
import sys

def show1():
    print 'start show1'
    save = sys.stdout
    sys.stdout = StringIO()
    print 'sys.stdout being buffered'
    proc = subprocess.Popen(['echo', 'hello'])
    proc.wait()
    in_stdout = sys.stdout.getvalue()
    sys.stdout = save
    print 'in buffer:', in_stdout

def show2():
    print 'start show2'
    save = sys.stdout
    sys.stdout = open(os.devnull, 'w')
    print 'after redirect sys.stdout'
    proc = subprocess.Popen(['echo', 'hello'])
    proc.wait()
    sys.stdout = save

show1()
show2()

When run:

$ python out.py
start show1
hello
in buffer: sys.stdout being buffered

start show2
hello

Note that the first routine will fail if you add stdout=sys.stdout, as a StringIO object has no fileno. The second will omit the hello if you add stdout=sys.stdout since sys.stdout has been redirected to os.devnull.

(If you redirect Python's file-descriptor-1, the subprocess will follow that redirection. The open(os.devnull, 'w') call produces a stream whose fileno() is greater than 2.)

  • Hmm. Your demo seems to show the opposite of the claim in the end. You're re-directing Python's stdout into the buffer but the subprocess stdout is still going to the console. How is that useful? Am I missing something? – Guy Sirton Aug 24 '13 at 21:15
  • @GuySirton: the demo shows that subprocess stdout (when not explicitly directed to sys.stdout) goes to Python's stdout, not the python program's (sys.) stdout. Which I admit is an ... odd distinction. Is there a better way to phrase this? – torek Aug 24 '13 at 21:17
  • that's good to know but we really want to capture the subprocess output here so changing sys.stdout is cool but doesn't help us I think. Good observation that communicate must be using something like select(), poll or threads. – Guy Sirton Aug 24 '13 at 21:37
  • 2
    +1, good explanation but it lacks the concrete code examples. Here's asyncio-based code that implements the "hard part" (it handles multiple pipes concurrently) in a portable way. You could compare it to the code that uses multiple threads (teed_call()) to do the same. – jfs Sep 30 '14 at 17:26
  • I've added an implementation with select() – sivann May 25 '17 at 14:27

We can also use the default file iterator for reading stdout instead of using iter construct with readline().

import subprocess
import sys
process = subprocess.Popen(your_command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
for line in process.stdout:
    sys.stdout.write(line)
  • 3
    why isn't this the accepted and most voted answer? – arod May 27 at 17:47

If you're able to use third-party libraries, You might be able to use something like sarge (disclosure: I'm its maintainer). This library allows non-blocking access to output streams from subprocesses - it's layered over the subprocess module.

  • Fine work on sarge, BTW. That does indeed solve the OP's requirement, but might be a bit heavy handed for that use-case. – deepelement Nov 24 '17 at 15:16

A good but "heavyweight" solution is to use Twisted - see the bottom.

If you're willing to live with only stdout something along those lines should work:

import subprocess
import sys
popenobj = subprocess.Popen(["ls", "-Rl"], stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
while not popenobj.poll():
   stdoutdata = popenobj.stdout.readline()
   if stdoutdata:
      sys.stdout.write(stdoutdata)
   else:
      break
print "Return code", popenobj.returncode

(If you use read() it tries to read the entire "file" which isn't useful, what we really could use here is something that reads all the data that's in the pipe right now)

One might also try to approach this with threading, e.g.:

import subprocess
import sys
import threading

popenobj = subprocess.Popen("ls", stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True)

def stdoutprocess(o):
   while True:
      stdoutdata = o.stdout.readline()
      if stdoutdata:
         sys.stdout.write(stdoutdata)
      else:
         break

t = threading.Thread(target=stdoutprocess, args=(popenobj,))
t.start()
popenobj.wait()
t.join()
print "Return code", popenobj.returncode

Now we could potentially add stderr as well by having two threads.

Note however the subprocess docs discourage using these files directly and recommends to use communicate() (mostly concerned with deadlocks which I think isn't an issue above) and the solutions are a little klunky so it really seems like the subprocess module isn't quite up to the job (also see: http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-3145/ ) and we need to look at something else.

A more involved solution is to use Twisted as shown here: https://twistedmatrix.com/documents/11.1.0/core/howto/process.html

The way you do this with Twisted is to create your process using reactor.spawnprocess() and providing a ProcessProtocol that then processes output asynchronously. The Twisted sample Python code is here: https://twistedmatrix.com/documents/11.1.0/core/howto/listings/process/process.py

  • Thanks! I just tried something like this (based on @PauloAlmeida 's comment, but my call to subprocess.Popen is blocking -- i.e. it only comes to the while loop once it returns... – DilithiumMatrix Aug 24 '13 at 18:59
  • 1
    That's not what's going on. It's entering the while loop right away then blocking on the read() call until the subprocess exits and the parent process receives EOF on the pipe. – Alp Aug 24 '13 at 19:00
  • @Alp interesting! so it is. – DilithiumMatrix Aug 24 '13 at 19:02
  • Yeah, I was too quick to post this. It actually doesn't work properly and can't be easily fixed. back to the drawing table. – Guy Sirton Aug 24 '13 at 19:02
  • 1
    @zhermes: So the problem with read() is that it will try to read the entire output till EOF which isn't useful. readline() helps and may be all you need (really long lines can also be a problem though). You also need to watch out for buffering in the process you're launching... – Guy Sirton Aug 24 '13 at 21:01

It looks like line-buffered output will work for you, in which case something like the following might suit. (Caveat: it's untested.) This will only give the subprocess's stdout in real time. If you want to have both stderr and stdout in real time, you'll have to do something more complex with select.

proc = subprocess.Popen(run_command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True)
while proc.poll() is None:
    line = proc.stdout.readline()
    print line
    log_file.write(line + '\n')
# Might still be data on stdout at this point.  Grab any
# remainder.
for line in proc.stdout.read().split('\n'):
    print line
    log_file.write(line + '\n')
# Do whatever you want with proc.stderr here...

Why not set stdout directly to sys.stdout? And if you need to output to a log as well, then you can simply override the write method of f.

import sys
import subprocess

class SuperFile(open.__class__):

    def write(self, data):
        sys.stdout.write(data)
        super(SuperFile, self).write(data)

f = SuperFile("log.txt","w+")       
process = subprocess.Popen(command, stdout=f, stderr=f)
  • That wouldn't work: the subprocess module forks and sets the stdout file descriptor to the file descriptor of the passed file object. The write-method would never be called (at least that's what subprocess does for stderr, I gues it's the same for stdout). – t.animal May 9 '17 at 14:13

Here is a class which I'm using in one of my projects. It redirects output of a subprocess to the log. At first I tried simply overwriting the write-method but that doesn't work as the subprocess will never call it (redirection happens on filedescriptor level). So I'm using my own pipe, similar to how it's done in the subprocess-module. This has the advantage of encapsulating all logging/printing logic in the adapter and you can simply pass instances of the logger to Popen: subprocess.Popen("/path/to/binary", stderr = LogAdapter("foo"))

class LogAdapter(threading.Thread):

    def __init__(self, logname, level = logging.INFO):
        super().__init__()
        self.log = logging.getLogger(logname)
        self.readpipe, self.writepipe = os.pipe()

        logFunctions = {
            logging.DEBUG: self.log.debug,
            logging.INFO: self.log.info,
            logging.WARN: self.log.warn,
            logging.ERROR: self.log.warn,
        }

        try:
            self.logFunction = logFunctions[level]
        except KeyError:
            self.logFunction = self.log.info

    def fileno(self):
        #when fileno is called this indicates the subprocess is about to fork => start thread
        self.start()
        return self.writepipe

    def finished(self):
       """If the write-filedescriptor is not closed this thread will
       prevent the whole program from exiting. You can use this method
       to clean up after the subprocess has terminated."""
       os.close(self.writepipe)

    def run(self):
        inputFile = os.fdopen(self.readpipe)

        while True:
            line = inputFile.readline()

            if len(line) == 0:
                #no new data was added
                break

            self.logFunction(line.strip())

If you don't need logging but simply want to use print() you can obviously remove large portions of the code and keep the class shorter. You could also expand it by an __enter__ and __exit__ method and call finished in __exit__ so that you could easily use it as context.

All of the above solutions I tried failed either to separate stderr and stdout output, (multiple pipes) or blocked forever when the OS pipe buffer was full which happens when the command you are running outputs too fast (there is a warning for this on python poll() manual of subprocess). The only reliable way I found was through select, but this is a posix-only solution:

import subprocess
import sys
import os
import select
# returns command exit status, stdout text, stderr text
# rtoutput: show realtime output while running
def run_script(cmd,rtoutput=0):
    p = subprocess.Popen(cmd, shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
    poller = select.poll()
    poller.register(p.stdout, select.POLLIN)
    poller.register(p.stderr, select.POLLIN)

    coutput=''
    cerror=''
    fdhup={}
    fdhup[p.stdout.fileno()]=0
    fdhup[p.stderr.fileno()]=0
    while sum(fdhup.values()) < len(fdhup):
        try:
            r = poller.poll(1)
        except select.error, err:
            if err.args[0] != EINTR:
                raise
            r=[]
        for fd, flags in r:
            if flags & (select.POLLIN | select.POLLPRI):
                c = os.read(fd, 1024)
                if rtoutput:
                    sys.stdout.write(c)
                    sys.stdout.flush()
                if fd == p.stderr.fileno():
                    cerror+=c
                else:
                    coutput+=c
            else:
                fdhup[fd]=1
    return p.poll(), coutput.strip(), cerror.strip()
  • Another alternative is to spin off one thread per pipe. Each thread can do blocking I/O on the pipe, without blocking the other thread(s). But this introduces its own set of issues. All methods have annoyances, you just pick which one(s) you find least annoying. :-) – torek May 25 '17 at 15:21

In addition to all these answer, one simple approach could also be as follows:

process = subprocess.Popen(your_command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)

while process.stdout.readable():
    line = process.stdout.readline()

    if not line:
        break

    print(line.strip())

Loop through the readable stream as long as it's readable and if it gets an empty result, stop it.

The key here is that readline() returns a line (with \n at the end) as long as there's an output and empty if it's really at the end.

Hope this helps someone.

Similar to previous answers but the following solution worked for for me on windows using Python3 to provide a common method to print and log in realtime (getting-realtime-output-using-python):

def print_and_log(command, logFile):
    with open(logFile, 'wb') as f:
        command = subprocess.Popen(command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True)

        while True:
            output = command.stdout.readline()
            if not output and command.poll() is not None:
                f.close()
                break
            if output:
                f.write(output)
                print(str(output.strip(), 'utf-8'), flush=True)
        return command.poll()

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