32

Using python I want to print a range of numbers on the same line. how can I do this using python, I can do it using C by not adding \n, but how can I do it using python.

for x in xrange(1,10):
    print x

I am trying to get this result.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

13 Answers 13

41

Python 2

for x in xrange(1,11):
    print x,

Python 3

for x in range(1,11):
    print(x, end=" ") 
3
  • That is a very simple solution! But what are the differences between this and the more complex solutions that others gave? answer accepted! – kyle k Aug 25 '13 at 1:58
  • 1
    So, "print x," is just the short hand way of escaping the newline when you're doing a series of prints. Your print was in a for loop, so this made sense. Below, the string.join method takes an iterable and combines each element with the supplied string and returns a single string. So instead of multiple prints without newlines, you're doing one print with a newline; just pre compiling all your printable elements into one string. – blakev Aug 25 '13 at 2:03
  • Thanks, that answered my questions. – kyle k Aug 25 '13 at 2:05
60
>>>print(*range(1,11)) 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Python one liner to print the range

4
  • 3
    Great answer. What's actually the meaning of the *? – majom Aug 30 '17 at 15:26
  • 4
    @majom * unpacks the sequence. – voidpro Aug 31 '17 at 6:36
  • Thanks. That I understood. Are you aware of a link to the documentation of *? It is hard to google for that. – majom Aug 31 '17 at 7:21
  • 4
    There are a few threads on the usage of *. You can very well refer here – voidpro Aug 31 '17 at 10:25
11
for i in range(10):
    print(i, end = ' ')

You can provide any delimiter to the end field (space, comma etc.)

This is for Python 3

9

str.join would be appropriate in this case

>>> print ' '.join(str(x) for x in xrange(1,11))
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
2

This is an old question, xrange is not supported in Python3.

You can try -

print(*range(1,11)) 

OR

for i in range(10):
    print(i, end = ' ')
1

Same can be achieved by using stdout.

>>> from sys import stdout
>>> for i in range(1,11):
...     stdout.write(str(i)+' ')
...
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

Alternatively, same can be done by using reduce() :

>>> xrange = range(1,11)
>>> print reduce(lambda x, y: str(x) + ' '+str(y), xrange)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
>>>
2
  • so much complexity for such a simple question. Plus, neither of those escape a new line, your first is piping to stdout which needs to be imported from sys and your second is concatenating strings with a lambda and an overwritten reserved function. Why wouldn't you use ' '.join(<list>)?? Both of these are bad practice. – blakev Aug 25 '13 at 3:20
  • @BlakeVandeMerwe I am trying to cover the possible ways. – subhash kumar singh Aug 25 '13 at 6:41
1
[print(i, end = ' ') for i in range(10)]
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

This is a list comprehension method of answer same as @Anubhav

5
  • This needlessly creates a list – OneCricketeer Oct 27 '19 at 19:13
  • In Python 3, better to use the unpacked list inside the print: print(*[i for i in range(10)], sep=" ") This way avoiding the creation of the empty list mentioned by @OneCricketeer – Aldo Bassanini Jun 16 '20 at 11:26
  • @AldoBassanini That creates a list as well... You also don't need i for i in. Just print(*range(10)) – OneCricketeer Jun 16 '20 at 15:19
  • @OneCricketeer the range object doesn't create an internal list when unpacked? – Aldo Bassanini Jun 17 '20 at 10:28
  • @AldoBassanini It is a generator in Python3 – OneCricketeer Jun 17 '20 at 15:42
0
for i in range(1,11):
    print(i)

i know this is an old question but i think this works now

1
  • 1
    No, it doesn't! Both the Python 3 print function and the Python 2 print statement implicitly adds a newline by default. – jmd_dk Jan 11 '17 at 21:23
0

Another single-line Python 3 option but with explicit separator:

print(*range(1,11), sep=' ')

3
  • Can you please explain how does it work, What is that * before range. – Vijender Kumar Jul 2 '20 at 4:50
  • @VijenderKumar This will print 1 to 10, separated by whatever string you put in the sep attribute. In the example above, each integer string is separated by a space. – Mykel Jul 2 '20 at 17:27
  • @VijenderKumar that's just python parameter positioning. – Mykel Nov 15 '20 at 21:12
0
n = int(input())
for i in range(1,n+1):
    print(i,end='')
2
  • 1
    Why is this better than the accepted answer, or different from the answer that suggest exactly this? – RalfFriedl Jun 22 '19 at 8:22
  • 1
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. – double-beep Jun 22 '19 at 9:10
0

Use end = " ", inside the print function

Code:

for x in range(1,11):
       print(x,end = " ")
0
0

Though the answer has been given for the question. I would like to add, if in case we need to print numbers without any spaces then we can use the following code

        for i in range(1,n):
            print(i,end="")
0

Here's a solution that can handle x with single or multiple rows like scipy pdf:

from scipy.stats import multivariate_normal as mvn

# covariance matrix
sigma = np.array([[2.3, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 1.5, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 1.7, 0],
           [0, 0,   0, 2]
          ])
# mean vector
mu = np.array([2,3,8,10])

# input
x1 = np.array([2.1, 3.5, 8., 9.5])
x2 = np.array([[2.1, 3.5, 8., 9.5],[2.2, 3.6, 8.1, 9.6]])


def multivariate_normal_pdf(x, mu, cov):
    x_m = x - mu

    if x.ndim > 1:
        sum_ax = 1
        t_ax = [0] 
        t_ax.extend(list(range(x_m.ndim)[:0:-1])) # transpose dims > 0
    else:
        sum_ax = 0
        t_ax = range(x_m.ndim)[::-1]


    x_m_t = np.transpose(x_m, axes=t_ax) 
    A = 1 / ( ((2* np.pi)**(len(mu)/2)) * (np.linalg.det(cov)**(1/2)) )
    B = (-1/2) * np.sum(x_m_t.dot(np.linalg.inv(cov)) * x_m,axis=sum_ax)
    return A * np.exp(B)

print(mvn.pdf(x1, mu, sigma))
print(multivariate_normal_pdf(x1, mu, sigma))

print(mvn.pdf(x2, mu, sigma))
print(multivariate_normal_pdf(x2, mu, sigma))

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.