22

It's relatively simple using grid.arrange in the gridExtra package to arrange multiple plots in a matrix, but how can you arrange plots (the ones I'm working on are from ggplot2) when some plots are intended to be larger than others? In base, I can use layout() such as in the example below:

 nf <- layout(matrix(c(1,1,1,2,3,1,1,1,4,5,6,7,8,9,9), byrow=TRUE, nrow=3))
 layout.show(nf)

what is the equivalent for ggplot plots?

enter image description here

Some plots for inclusion

library(ggplot2)
p1 <- qplot(x=wt,y=mpg,geom="point",main="Scatterplot of wt vs. mpg", data=mtcars)
p2 <- qplot(x=wt,y=disp,geom="point",main="Scatterplot of wt vs disp", data=mtcars)
p3 <- qplot(wt,data=mtcars)
p4 <- qplot(wt,mpg,data=mtcars,geom="boxplot")
p5 <- qplot(wt,data=mtcars)
p6 <- qplot(mpg,data=mtcars)
p7 <- qplot(disp,data=mtcars)
p8 <- qplot(disp, y=..density.., geom="density", data=mtcars)
p9 <- qplot(mpg, y=..density.., geom="density", data=mtcars)
1

5 Answers 5

13

You can use nested arrangeGrob calls like this example:

library(ggplot2)
library(gridExtra)

p <- ggplot(data.frame(x=1, y=1), aes(x,y)) + geom_point()

grid.arrange(
  arrangeGrob(
    p, 
    arrangeGrob(p, p, nrow=2),
    ncol=2 ,widths=c(2,1)),
  arrangeGrob(p, p ,p ,ncol=3, widths=rep(1,3)),
  nrow=2)

Edit:

gl <- lapply(1:9, function(ii) grobTree(rectGrob(),textGrob(ii)))

grid.arrange(
  arrangeGrob(gl[[1]],
              do.call(arrangeGrob, c(gl[2:5], ncol=2)),
              nrow=1,
              widths=3:2),
  do.call(arrangeGrob, c(gl[6:9], nrow=1, list(widths=c(1,1,1,2)))),
nrow=2, heights=c(2,1))

enter image description here

3
  • you don't need an anonymous function with do.call, there's already ... in the definition of arrangeGrob
    – baptiste
    Aug 25, 2013 at 13:57
  • @baptiste I know and use that with nrow, but got an error when trying to pass widths.
    – Roland
    Aug 25, 2013 at 14:01
  • 1
    it's because of the way c() works with lists. One needs to use do.call(arrangeGrob, c(gl[6:9], nrow=1, list(widths=c(1,1,1,2))))
    – baptiste
    Aug 25, 2013 at 21:13
11

An alternative with gtable

library(gtable)

gl <- lapply(1:9, function(ii) grobTree(textGrob(ii), rectGrob()))
# gl <- lapply(1:9, function(ii) ggplotGrob(qplot(1,1) + ggtitle(ii)))

gt <- gtable(widths=unit(rep(1,5), "null"),
             heights=unit(rep(1,3), "null"))

gtable_add_grobs <- gtable_add_grob # alias

gt <- gtable_add_grobs(gt, gl, 
                       l=c(1,4,5,4,5,1,2,3,4),
                       r=c(3,4,5,4,5,1,2,3,5),
                       t=c(1,1,1,2,2,3,3,3,3),
                       b=c(2,1,1,2,2,3,3,3,3))
grid.newpage()
grid.draw(gt)

enter image description here

2
  • This seems a popular method, but I can't work out how to add ggplot-like grobs to the plot. (In Roland's example, it's easy.) Could you explain how to add plots in? (I've included some sample plots in OP.)
    – Hugh
    Aug 26, 2013 at 23:54
  • 1
    ggplotGrob converts a ggplot to a grob, there's a commented line using it in my example
    – baptiste
    Aug 27, 2013 at 0:01
9

You can use the same matrix interface as layout with grid.arrange,

library(gridExtra)
library(grid)
gl <- lapply(1:9, function(ii) grobTree(rectGrob(), textGrob(ii)))

grid.arrange(grobs = gl, layout_matrix = rbind(c(1,1,1,2,3),
                                               c(1,1,1,4,5),
                                               c(6,7,8,9,9)))

enter image description here

and the same works for ggplots; note that NA can be used to indicate blank cells. The result is a gtable, compatible with ggsave().

gl <- replicate(9, ggplot(), FALSE)
grid.arrange(grobs = gl, layout_matrix = rbind(c(1,1,1,2,3),
                                               c(1,1,1,4,5),
                                               c(6,7,8,NA,9)))

enter image description here

0
8

I appreciate all the other answers, but Didzis Elferts's comment on the OP connected to the answer that I found easiest to implement.

library(ggplot2)
p1 <- qplot(x=wt,y=mpg,geom="point",main="Scatterplot of wt vs. mpg", data=mtcars)
p2 <- qplot(x=wt,y=disp,geom="point",main="Scatterplot of wt vs disp", data=mtcars)
p3 <- qplot(wt,data=mtcars)
p4 <- qplot(wt,mpg,data=mtcars,geom="boxplot")
p5 <- qplot(wt,data=mtcars)
p6 <- qplot(mpg,data=mtcars)
p7 <- qplot(disp,data=mtcars)
p8 <- qplot(disp, y=..density.., geom="density", data=mtcars)
p9 <- qplot(mpg, y=..density.., geom="density", data=mtcars)

vplayout <- function(x, y) viewport(layout.pos.row = x, layout.pos.col = y)

grid.newpage()
pushViewport(viewport(layout = grid.layout(3, 5))) # 3 rows, 5 columns
print(p1, vp = vplayout(1:2, 1:3))  # the big plot covers rows 1:2 and cols 1:3
print(p2, vp = vplayout(1, 4))
print(p3, vp = vplayout(1, 5))
print(p4, vp = vplayout(2, 4))
print(p5, vp = vplayout(2, 5))
print(p6, vp = vplayout(3, 1))
print(p7, vp = vplayout(3, 2))
print(p8, vp = vplayout(3, 3))
print(p9, vp = vplayout(3, 4:5))
1
  • This is great! Any way to add a single title at the top of the superplot?
    – Pertinax
    May 13, 2018 at 14:23
8

I like the interface provided by the lay_out function (formerly in the wq package) . It takes arguments of the form list(plot, row(s), column(s)). For your example:

lay_out(list(p1, 1:2, 1:3),
       list(p2, 1, 4),
       list(p3, 1, 5),
       list(p4, 2, 4),
       list(p5, 2, 5),
       list(p6, 3, 1),
       list(p7, 3, 2),
       list(p8, 3, 3),
       list(p9, 3, 4:5))

Which yields:

enter image description here

lay_out = function(...) {    
    x <- list(...)
    n <- max(sapply(x, function(x) max(x[[2]])))
    p <- max(sapply(x, function(x) max(x[[3]])))
    grid::pushViewport(grid::viewport(layout = grid::grid.layout(n, p)))    

    for (i in seq_len(length(x))) {
        print(x[[i]][[1]], vp = grid::viewport(layout.pos.row = x[[i]][[2]], 
            layout.pos.col = x[[i]][[3]]))
    }
} 

(Code sourced from a prior version of the wq package, from the commit history on the unofficial Github CRAN mirror.)

3
  • this is the simplest solution but it appears that the layOut function no longer exists. Are there any other straightforward options that you are aware of?
    – Meli
    Jun 6, 2016 at 15:30
  • Thank you. Is there a way to make this work for combining ggplot and non ggplot graphics?
    – Meli
    Jun 10, 2016 at 18:51
  • It should work for any grid graphics, which mostly means ggplot and lattice. If you want to use base graphics you could maybe make it work with the gridBase package. Jun 10, 2016 at 19:48

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