20

I want to create basic JUnit test for JavaFX 8 application. I have this simple code sample:

public class Main extends Application {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Application.launch(args);
    }
    @Override
    public void start(Stage primaryStage) {
        primaryStage.setTitle("Tabs");
        Group root = new Group();
        Scene scene = new Scene(root, 400, 250, Color.WHITE);
        TabPane tabPane = new TabPane();
        BorderPane borderPane = new BorderPane();
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            Tab tab = new Tab();
            tab.setText("Tab" + i);
            HBox hbox = new HBox();
            hbox.getChildren().add(new Label("Tab" + i));
            hbox.setAlignment(Pos.CENTER);
            tab.setContent(hbox);
            tabPane.getTabs().add(tab);
        }
        // bind to take available space
        borderPane.prefHeightProperty().bind(scene.heightProperty());
        borderPane.prefWidthProperty().bind(scene.widthProperty());

        borderPane.setCenter(tabPane);
        root.getChildren().add(borderPane);
        primaryStage.setScene(scene);
        primaryStage.show();
    }
}

I only have this code so far:

import javafx.application.Application;
import javafx.stage.Stage;
import org.junit.BeforeClass;

public class BasicStart extends Application {

    @BeforeClass
    public static void initJFX() {
        Thread t = new Thread("JavaFX Init Thread") {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                Application.launch(BasicStart.class, new String[0]);
            }
        };
        t.setDaemon(true);
        t.start();
    }

    @Override
    public void start(Stage primaryStage) throws Exception {
        // noop
    }
}

Can you tell me how I can create JUnit test for the above code?

  • 2
    I would recommend using JemmyFX - it takes a bit of time and effort to setup and get used to, but it is very powerful. You are probably going to spend a lot of time and effort doing something not as good if you start from scratch anyway. – assylias Aug 26 '13 at 8:51
31

I use a Junit Rule to run unit tests on the JavaFX thread. The details are in this post. Just copy the class from that post and then add this field to your unit tests.

@Rule public JavaFXThreadingRule javafxRule = new JavaFXThreadingRule();

This code works for both JavaFX 2 and JavaFX 8.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This works quite nicely however running the test on the thread means you cannot have any sleeps or waits and any code that uses platform.runLater cannot be tested - unless you can suggest a work around? – Adam Nov 6 '14 at 11:38
  • @Adam Why would you not be able to use any sleeps or waits? They are generally not recommended to use in unit tests, but I don't see why you wouldn't be able to use them if you really needed. If you want to use Platform.runLater() then you can just run on the main thread, otherwise why do you need to call Platform.runLater() if you are already on the javafx thread? – Brian Blonski Nov 7 '14 at 21:48
  • 1
    To try and explain better.... I'm talking about integration tests here, not really unit tests although using JUnit. If the display is updated from another thread, say a network client then Platform.runLater(runnable) must be used, however that runnable is not executed until after the test (running on the fx thread) has completed and returned control back to the main FX thread which will then service the next job in the queue. – Adam Nov 8 '14 at 7:05
  • @Adam Ah, that's right. The junit tests exit before the javafx thread gets a chance to run. Integration tests are always tricky, but for this situation I think you can take advantage that javafx thread code will run in order. Create and lock a mutex, call your Platform.runLater() code, then release the mutex in another Platform.runLater() block that runs after the first one. Then have your test wait on the mutex. You might also want to check out GUI testing tools like Jemmy or TestFX for integration tests. I hear you can use tempusfugitlibrary.org for asynchronous test validation. – Brian Blonski Nov 11 '14 at 22:20
  • 1
    This solution clashes with PowerMock! As soon as you include this rule into a JUnit test annotated to run with PowerMockRunner you get Exception in thread "AWT-EventQueue-0" java.lang.RuntimeException: java.lang.UnsatisfiedLinkError: Native Library libglass.so already loaded in another classloader – Angelos Asonitis Apr 18 '19 at 18:50
7

The easiest aproach is the following:

import javafx.application.Platform;
import javafx.embed.swing.JFXPanel;
import javafx.stage.Stage;

import org.junit.Test;

public class BasicStart {

    @Test
    public void testA() throws InterruptedException {
        Thread thread = new Thread(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                new JFXPanel(); // Initializes the JavaFx Platform
                Platform.runLater(new Runnable() {

                    @Override
                    public void run() {
                        new Main().start(new Stage()); // Create and
                                                        // initialize
                                                        // your app.

                    }
                });
            }
        });
        thread.start();// Initialize the thread
        Thread.sleep(10000); // Time to use the app, with out this, the thread
                                // will be killed before you can tell.
    }

}

Hope it helps!

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    I'd avoid Thread.sleep() if you can. It's not a big deal with few tests, but it really slows down when you have hundreds of tests. See if you can use some sort of latch instead. – Brian Blonski Sep 24 '13 at 18:04
  • As it stands this doesn't appear to report a failed assertion (inside run) using the normal JUnit reporting mechanisms, because Runnable cannot propagate an Exception. – mike rodent Jan 30 '18 at 21:26
5

Based on Brian Blonski 's answer I created a JUnit-Testrunner, that does essentially the same thing, but is a bit simpler to use in my opinion. Using it, your test would look like this:

@RunWith( JfxTestRunner.class )
public class MyUnitTest
{
  @Test
  public void testMyMethod()
  {
   //...
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    It seems your link is broken. Would have loved to see the TestRunner! – MikaelF Oct 2 '17 at 21:00
  • 1
    I have fixed the link. But I should warn you; I found the code to be not thread-safe. – Oliver Jan Krylow Oct 20 '17 at 9:22
  • Works perfect! Thx 4 that – davidwillianx Apr 19 '18 at 13:57
  • How do you specify the class of the app that should be run? – Daniel May 1 '18 at 5:36

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