241

I have a DataFrame with many missing values in columns which I wish to groupby:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df = pd.DataFrame({'a': ['1', '2', '3'], 'b': ['4', np.NaN, '6']})

In [4]: df.groupby('b').groups
Out[4]: {'4': [0], '6': [2]}

see that Pandas has dropped the rows with NaN target values. (I want to include these rows!)

Since I need many such operations (many cols have missing values), and use more complicated functions than just medians (typically random forests), I want to avoid writing too complicated pieces of code.

Any suggestions? Should I write a function for this or is there a simple solution?

5
  • 1
    @PhillipCloud I've edited this question to include just the question, which is actual quite good, relating to open pandas enhancement of Jeff's. Aug 25, 2013 at 17:13
  • 2
    There not being able to include (and propagate) NaNs in groups is quite aggravating. Citing R is not convincing, as this behavior is not consistent with a lot of other things. Anyway, the dummy hack is also pretty bad. However, the size (includes NaNs) and the count (ignores NaNs) of a group will differ if there are NaNs. dfgrouped = df.groupby(['b']).a.agg(['sum','size','count']) dfgrouped['sum'][dfgrouped['size']!=dfgrouped['count']] = None
    – user7969724
    May 5, 2017 at 16:57
  • Can you summarize what you are specifically trying to achieve? i.e. we see an output, but what is the "desired" output?
    – c-a
    Aug 12, 2017 at 18:24
  • 13
    With pandas 1.1 you will soon be able to specify dropna=False in groupby() to get your desired result. More info
    – cs95
    May 20, 2020 at 21:18
  • Note that as of this writing, there is a bug that makes dropna=False fail with MultiIndex grouping. There are a handful of open issues mentioning this on their github and not a lot of momentum on fixing it yet unfortunately.
    – totalhack
    Apr 11, 2021 at 22:09

7 Answers 7

265

pandas >= 1.1

From pandas 1.1 you have better control over this behavior, NA values are now allowed in the grouper using dropna=False:

pd.__version__
# '1.1.0.dev0+2004.g8d10bfb6f'

# Example from the docs
df

   a    b  c
0  1  2.0  3
1  1  NaN  4
2  2  1.0  3
3  1  2.0  2

# without NA (the default)
df.groupby('b').sum()

     a  c
b        
1.0  2  3
2.0  2  5
# with NA
df.groupby('b', dropna=False).sum()

     a  c
b        
1.0  2  3
2.0  2  5
NaN  1  4
7
  • 25
    Hopefully this answer makes a gradual march up to the top. It's the correct approach.
    – kdbanman
    Jun 1, 2020 at 18:53
  • 1
    It doesn't work to me. kroscek_jupyter_metabase = fromdb_1474_detail.groupby(groupby, dropna = False)[col_to_count].count() returns TypeError: groupby() got an unexpected keyword argument 'dropna'
    – Cignitor
    Jan 23, 2021 at 7:11
  • @Cignitor please run print(pd.__version__) and let me know what it says.
    – cs95
    Jan 23, 2021 at 7:23
  • 4
    This fails with MultiIndex grouping unfortunately. The most straightforward workaround I've seen so far, albeit ugly, appears to be replacing the NaN value before grouping.
    – totalhack
    Apr 11, 2021 at 22:21
  • I wound like None to be in the same group!
    – Ievgen
    Jun 3, 2021 at 20:21
174

This is mentioned in the Missing Data section of the docs:

NA groups in GroupBy are automatically excluded. This behavior is consistent with R

One workaround is to use a placeholder before doing the groupby (e.g. -1):

In [11]: df.fillna(-1)
Out[11]: 
   a   b
0  1   4
1  2  -1
2  3   6

In [12]: df.fillna(-1).groupby('b').sum()
Out[12]: 
    a
b    
-1  2
4   1
6   3

That said, this feels pretty awful hack... perhaps there should be an option to include NaN in groupby (see this github issue - which uses the same placeholder hack).

However, as described in another answer, "from pandas 1.1 you have better control over this behavior, NA values are now allowed in the grouper using dropna=False"

13
  • 4
    This is a logical but a sort of funny solution that I've thought of earlier, Pandas makes NaN fields from the empty ones, and we have to change them back. This is the reason that I'm thinking of looking for other solutions like running an SQL server and querying the tables from there (looks a bit too complicated), or looking another library in spite of Pandas, or use my own (that I want to get rid of). Thx Aug 26, 2013 at 20:52
  • @GyulaSámuelKarli To me this seems a small bug (see the bugreport above), and my solution is a workaround. I find it strange you write off the entire library. Aug 26, 2013 at 21:02
  • 1
    I don't want to write down Pandas just look for the tool that fits my requests the most. Aug 26, 2013 at 21:08
  • 1
    Have a look at my answer below, I believe I have found a pretty good (cleaner, and probably faster) solution. stackoverflow.com/a/43375020/408853
    – c-a
    Apr 12, 2017 at 16:33
  • 4
    No, this is not consistent with R. df %>% group_by will give NA summaries too with a warning which can be avoided by passing the grouping column through fct_explicit_na and then a (Missing) level is created. Aug 16, 2019 at 13:33
48

Ancient topic, if someone still stumbles over this--another workaround is to convert via .astype(str) to string before grouping. That will conserve the NaN's.

df = pd.DataFrame({'a': ['1', '2', '3'], 'b': ['4', np.NaN, '6']})
df['b'] = df['b'].astype(str)
df.groupby(['b']).sum()
    a
b   
4   1
6   3
nan 2
4
  • @K3---rnc: See the comment to your link - the author of the post in your link did something wrong.
    – Thomas
    Jun 6, 2018 at 16:31
  • @Thomas, yes, exactly as in the example above. Please edit if you can make the example safe (and as trivial).
    – K3---rnc
    Jun 6, 2018 at 22:21
  • 1
    The sum of a is string concatenation here, not a numeric sum. This only "works" because 'b' consisted of distinct entries. You need 'a' to be numeric and 'b' to be string Feb 27, 2019 at 16:38
  • Note the column a is an object and the resultant mean after groupby may not be the thing you want!!!!!!!!!
    – Jason Goal
    Feb 27 at 9:09
12

I am not able to add a comment to M. Kiewisch since I do not have enough reputation points (only have 41 but need more than 50 to comment).

Anyway, just want to point out that M. Kiewisch solution does not work as is and may need more tweaking. Consider for example

>>> df = pd.DataFrame({'a': [1, 2, 3, 5], 'b': [4, np.NaN, 6, 4]})
>>> df
   a    b
0  1  4.0
1  2  NaN
2  3  6.0
3  5  4.0
>>> df.groupby(['b']).sum()
     a
b
4.0  6
6.0  3
>>> df.astype(str).groupby(['b']).sum()
      a
b
4.0  15
6.0   3
nan   2

which shows that for group b=4.0, the corresponding value is 15 instead of 6. Here it is just concatenating 1 and 5 as strings instead of adding it as numbers.

3
  • 13
    That's because you converted the entire DF to str, instead of just the b column
    – Korem
    Aug 4, 2017 at 8:31
  • Note that this have been fixed in the mentioned answer now.
    – Shaido
    Aug 21, 2019 at 2:02
  • 1
    The new solution is better but still not safe, in my opinion. Consider a case where one of the entries in column 'b' is same as stringified np.NaN. Then those things are clubbed together. df = pd.DataFrame({'a': [1, 2, 3, 5, 6], 'b': ['foo', np.NaN, 'bar', 'foo', 'nan']}); df['b'] = df['b'].astype(str); df.groupby(['b']).sum() Aug 21, 2019 at 15:14
7

All answers provided thus far result in potentially dangerous behavior as it is quite possible you select a dummy value that is actually part of the dataset. This is increasingly likely as you create groups with many attributes. Simply put, the approach doesn't always generalize well.

A less hacky solve is to use pd.drop_duplicates() to create a unique index of value combinations each with their own ID, and then group on that id. It is more verbose but does get the job done:

def safe_groupby(df, group_cols, agg_dict):
    # set name of group col to unique value
    group_id = 'group_id'
    while group_id in df.columns:
        group_id += 'x'
    # get final order of columns
    agg_col_order = (group_cols + list(agg_dict.keys()))
    # create unique index of grouped values
    group_idx = df[group_cols].drop_duplicates()
    group_idx[group_id] = np.arange(group_idx.shape[0])
    # merge unique index on dataframe
    df = df.merge(group_idx, on=group_cols)
    # group dataframe on group id and aggregate values
    df_agg = df.groupby(group_id, as_index=True)\
               .agg(agg_dict)
    # merge grouped value index to results of aggregation
    df_agg = group_idx.set_index(group_id).join(df_agg)
    # rename index
    df_agg.index.name = None
    # return reordered columns
    return df_agg[agg_col_order]

Note that you can now simply do the following:

data_block = [np.tile([None, 'A'], 3),
              np.repeat(['B', 'C'], 3),
              [1] * (2 * 3)]

col_names = ['col_a', 'col_b', 'value']

test_df = pd.DataFrame(data_block, index=col_names).T

grouped_df = safe_groupby(test_df, ['col_a', 'col_b'],
                          OrderedDict([('value', 'sum')]))

This will return the successful result without having to worry about overwriting real data that is mistaken as a dummy value.

1
  • This is the best solution for the general case, but in cases where I know of an invalid string / number I can use instead, I'm probably going to go with Andy Hayden's answer below... I hope pandas fixes this behavior soon. Apr 24, 2020 at 21:51
6

One small point to Andy Hayden's solution – it doesn't work (anymore?) because np.nan == np.nan yields False, so the replace function doesn't actually do anything.

What worked for me was this:

df['b'] = df['b'].apply(lambda x: x if not np.isnan(x) else -1)

(At least that's the behavior for Pandas 0.19.2. Sorry to add it as a different answer, I do not have enough reputation to comment.)

1
  • 14
    There is also df['b'].fillna(-1).
    – K3---rnc
    Feb 6, 2017 at 20:08
4

I answered this already, but some reason the answer was converted to a comment. Nevertheless, this is the most efficient solution:

Not being able to include (and propagate) NaNs in groups is quite aggravating. Citing R is not convincing, as this behavior is not consistent with a lot of other things. Anyway, the dummy hack is also pretty bad. However, the size (includes NaNs) and the count (ignores NaNs) of a group will differ if there are NaNs.

dfgrouped = df.groupby(['b']).a.agg(['sum','size','count'])

dfgrouped['sum'][dfgrouped['size']!=dfgrouped['count']] = None

When these differ, you can set the value back to None for the result of the aggregation function for that group.

1
  • 1
    This was super helpful to me but it answers a slightly different question than the original one. IIUC, your solution propagates NaNs in the summation, but the NaN items in the "b" column still get dropped as rows.
    – Andrew
    Jun 6, 2019 at 15:31

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