This question already has an answer here:

Why can't you use numbers in CSS and is there another way of doing the job? I have the following code:

<div class="center 400-width" id="position">
    <div class="" id="header">
        Header
    </div>
    <div class="" id="content">
        Content
    </div>
    <div class="" id="footer">
        Footer
    </div>
</div>

The CSS selects the class 400-width which means the container gets a width of 400px. And the background-color is for checking if it's true.

.400-width{
    width:400px;
    background-color:blue;
    color:white;
}

It doesn't happen right now as you can see here

I solved the problem by replacing 400- by four. So it becomes fourwidth.

marked as duplicate by TylerH, Paul Roub, kayess, Samuel Liew, Mogsdad Jan 4 at 2:05

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

i have faced the same problem.... actually it not a problem anyway..

instead of '.400-width' use '.width-400'

.width-400{
    width:400px;
    background-color:blue;
    color:white;
}

CSS classnames can't begin with a number, they must begin with a letter; this has caught me out before when doing grid systems etc. You might use width-400 or for brevity w400.

._400-width{
    width:400px;
    background-color:blue;
    color:white;
}

this can help you with the semantic of css

css semantic

Bad Semantics

<div class="article">
  <div class="article_title">Smurf Movie Kinda Sucks</div>
  <div class="the_content">Not surprisingly, this weeks release of
     <div class="darkbold">The Smurfs</div> kinda sucks.</div>
</div>

Good Semantics

<article>
  <h1>Smurf Movie Kinda Sucks</h1>
  <p>Not surprisingly, this weeks release of
     <b>The Smurfs</b> kinda sucks.</p>
</article>
  • The link may theoretically answer the question, but it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. – JJJ Aug 26 '13 at 10:55

According to W3C spec CSS identifier cannot start with number, but if you would like to keep 400-width, you can use a little trick and replace leading number n with \3n like

.\34 00-width{
  width:400px;
  background-color:blue;
  color:white;
}

Here you have it working in your jsfiddle, plus few other samples, and related SO comment

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